RIP Neil Peart

Abelard Lindsey

Woodpecker
Its interesting that Rush is considered the nerd band in that its many fans in the late 70's were anything but nerds. They were mostly just late 70's rock guys, sort of like the guys you see on the field of Comiskey Park on Disco Demolition Night (google this, it is a hoot!). I actually was not into Rush during that time (although I thought Moving Pictures was so far beyond anything else I had ever heard). I really did not get into Rush until I was living in SoCal in the late 80's starting when I was 23. So, kind of late for a Rush fan.

As I said before, their libertarian lyrics was icing on the cake. Primarily, I appreciated Rush not only for their virtuosity, but also the mostly up-beat nature of their music which was in stark contrast to most other rock at the time, which seemed to be mostly about drugs and personal hardship.

Rush is about the only band where I like their later stuff better than earlier stuff (although I consider all Rush to be good). Nearly all other bands I prefer the earlier to later stuff. Rush simply refined their craft as they moved through time. Very few bands do this.
 

Hermetic Seal

Kingfisher
Gold Member
I always thought it was interesting that the guys in Rush married young and stayed married. They had no interest in the party lifestyle at all, and directed all their energy toward composing and performing great music. I would love to see more bands take that approach.
 

Abelard Lindsey

Woodpecker
HermeticAlly said:
I always thought it was interesting that the guys in Rush married young and stayed married. They had no interest in the party lifestyle at all, and directed all their energy toward composing and performing great music. I would love to see more bands take that approach.
This was another thing I appreciated about them. They were not the stereotypical "decadent" rock stars that rock used to be associated with.
 

SeaFM

Kingfisher
Geddy Lee played keyboards, bass with his feet and sang at the same freaking time.

The guy is fucking amazing in his own right.
 
Lifeson also played taurus pedals with his feet. A lot of the synth in La Villa Strangiato was actually Lifeson on the pedals. All three of those guys fed off each other. Seems to me, it's chemistry.
 

Rigsby

Pelican
Gold Member
Dusty said:
Neil was enormously influenced by Phil Collins’ drumming.

Most people have no idea that Phil Collins was a monster drummer before becoming a singer then pop superstar.

Neil was enormously influenced by Phil Collins’ drumming.


I didn't know that. Makes sense.



Most people have no idea that Phil Collins was a monster drummer before becoming a singer then pop superstar.


If you are a musician and play in a band, then you will know that Phil Collins is held in high regard by all drummers. Yes, he's a monster of a player. He's a virtuoso of/on the drums. To say he's not a major talent is like saying Jimi Hendrix couldn't play guitar. It just shows that the person making the statement should not be taken seriously.

Phil Collins is also a great songwriter. He can sing too. Oh, and he can act!

But more than that, he was John Martyn's friend, who he holed up with and got absolutely fucking wrecked with, when they were both going through their 'difficult' divorces. It takes a special kind of man to 'hole down' with someone like John Martyn, who, let's face it, is an arsehole's arsehole, if ever there was one.

Safe to say, Phil can play the drums, he can take a drink, he can write a tune, but more than all that, he's a bit of a rum fucker to be around, beyond what it takes to just be one of those 'successful' rock stars, who just happened to have 'lucked out'. Phil gets preferential treatment when he comes in to my studio, because he's just that good. He also gets preferential treatment when I'm looking for a good drinking buddy who won't bore me half to death.

And if you still don't believe me then look up his performance of Carpet Crawlers - who else could upstage Gabriel? The fact that he had an uncanny ability to mimic Gabriel's voice after he left Genesis is just one of those funny/unfunny twists of fate, that propelled the band and him to even greater stardom/success. The fact he was the drummer in the band before hand is just downright bizzare. Phil Collins made the best of what he had. And what he had was a lot. But that still doesn't explain his great success.

I could do the whole Patrick Bateman thing, but that's just so tiresome.

Phil Collins is a man who made it.

I understand why people hate him. Just like why people hate Mark Knopfler.

But I must stand up for and champion these rare talents.

I think maybe Phil over did it a bit when he was hanging around with John Martyn. You pays the piper and you takes your choice! Something like that.


But this isn't about Phil. It's about Neil!



What a strange thing.

On the day Neil died (I only found out today) I had a weird compulsion to check out his videos on youtube. I'm a lifelong Rush fan. But this was something else. Sometimes people turn to Neil for sage wisdom when life and love and men have failed to bring anything good or quantifiable to the table. I did not know this was the day he died. Weird that.

It was a Tuesday. The 7th of January.

I was beyond reach. My whole world having failed me. And I having failed it.

The story of Neil Peart is a good one. It's about a man having reached the heady tops of life. Then seeing his daughter die as a teenager in a car crash. Then his wife dying of cancer less than a year later. Somehow he carried on.

He used to carry around a motorbike in the Rush tour bus. When they docked he would get the bike out and just ride. He had no time for ordinary men who wanted to be his friend. "They don't even know me" was his cry.

He just wanted to get out there and meet ordinary people who had no idea of who he was, who had no idea of what the band "Rush" was. Who didn't want to know him because of who he was, or what they might be able to gain from the small experience, of just saying 'hello'.

He wanted anonymity. And in some small part he got it. Out on the road. Riding his bike.


I'm still trying to process his death. I don't do grief-whoring. But this is a strange one. Why did I decide to look him up and take counsel from him on the very day he died? The news had not broken yet.

This is what I took from all the youtube comments: He was a man most loved. In a very deep sense. Beyond that which even a supreme virtuoso like him would generally muster. Many and most spoke of his deep humanity. They called him "The Professor" - that's right! Because not only was he a master of the drum kit, he was also a master of the classics. He was a master of the humanities in every sense of the saying. People love Neil. He wasn't just well liked. He was well loved.

One of his gifts was the ability to talk without interruption and put in verbal place-holders like 'um' and 'ah' and 'you know' - though if you listen long enough he did use these, just in smaller quantities than pretty much any other human being. They didn't call him 'The Professor' for nothing.

Never a dull word dripped from his lips. Every rare syllable had meaning. Just like every beat of the drum. Every hit of the stick. It had to count!

This is my eulogy to the man. A man that not only touched me through his music, but also touched me with his deeper humanity and strength in the face of adversity. Why am I not surprised he kept his illness so quiet?

I still have no idea why I decided to check out his videos again at that particular time. I'm as weirded out by that fact as I am by the fact he has died.

To think, on that very day, I was partaking of his wisdom, and that was the very day he had shuffled off...


This is probably the best video you can watch of the man - it was taken when he was in his prime. He did not yet know that in a few months his daughter would die, and that his wife would die a few months after. Tragic.

We can observe. But not take a little joy in it. We are voyeurs to one's great tragedy. But we do not take anything from the fact, other than to say, quietly to oneself: Here I am, observing like a God, but as a Man, I just hope: I pray that never happens to me...


But do not revel in that dark night. There is much joy and light here.


This is part one:



This is part two:




If you play the drums, it will be a master class.

If you just want to see a man who has reached self-actualisation, according to Maslow's narrow definition, then have at it.

If you want to see a man in his prime before the Gods themselves smite him, then take a certain knowledge in that, if you must.




Some are born to move the world
To live their fantasies
But most of us just dream about
The things we'd like to be






R.I.P. The Professor.



It's not how fast you can go
The force goes into the flow
If you pick up the beat
You can forget about the heat
More than just survival
More than just a flash
More than just a dotted line
More than just a dash
It's a test of ultimate will
The heartbreak climb uphill
Got to pick up the pace
If you want to stay in the race
More than just blind ambition
More than just simple greed
More than just a finish line
Must feed this burning need
In the long run
From first to last
The peak is never passed
Something always fires the light
That gets in your eyes
One moment's high
And glory rolls on by
Like a streak of lightning
That flashes and fades
In the summer sky
Your meters may overload
You can rest at the side of the road
You can miss a stride
But nobody gets a free ride
More than high performance
More than just a spark
More than just the bottom line
Or a lucky shot in the dark
In the long run
You can do a lot in a lifetime
If you don't burn out too fast
You can make the most of the distance
First you need endurance
First you've got to last
 

Hermetic Seal

Kingfisher
Gold Member
Power Windows has some great songs, Middletown Dreams is one of my favorite Rush songs period.

It used to be kind of cool to hate on Rush's mid-80s albums, but now fans seem to acknowledge them as pretty solid.
 

Hypno

Crow
Sargon2112 said:
The first Rush I ever heard was around 1991 when I was 14 - Fly By Night. It was on my middle school friend's copied cassette (as much of the album as he could fit on one side), which he had obtained from his older brother. On the flip side of the cassette was Moving Pictures. We were blown away with FBN, but just when we didn't think it could get any better, we flipped the tape and Tom Sawyer started up. That was it, I was absolutely hooked. I had never heard anything like it. I remember thinking, "now this is what music should sound like." I wore out a Sony walkman or two just playing Rush. I would save my grass cutting money just to buy a Rush tape every couple of weeks until I had them all. The lyrics to the songs got my attention just as much as the music and really had a profound influence on me from a young teenager into adulthood. The intelligent, yet catchy style and subject matters really got my gears turning and essentially convinced me that being stupid was not an option.

In a word, inspirational.

RIP.
 

catoblepa

Woodpecker
So I was watching a Geddy Lee interview where he admits his 70s vocal style was annoying but he justifies it saying that it was popular at the time to imitate Robert Plant. Oddly enough Plant ruined his voice quite early. If you listen to the bootlegs from the Japan concerts in Oct. 1972 it's obvious he lost his pristine vocal range and if you listen carefully to any other LZ concert from then on, he never got it back.
 

Abelard Lindsey

Woodpecker
Good point about Geddy Lee and Robert Plant. I had a friend in college who hated Rush because of Geddy's voice, but was totally into Led Zeppelin. His favorite able was Zeppelin Four (of course!). I always thought Robert Plant's voice was a much of a high pitched wail as Geddy Lee's and I always like Rush better than Led Zeppelin (but I like both).

Geddy Lee has also lost his vocal range as well. This is quite evident on the R40 tour CD's.
 

puckerman

Ostrich
Geddy Lee has a very memorable voice. You hear him and know exactly who it is.

Robert Plant is just another who hard rock frontman who screams and tries to call it singing.
 

Eusebius

Hummingbird
Gold Member
puckerman said:
Geddy Lee has a very memorable voice. You hear him and know exactly who it is.

Robert Plant is just another who hard rock frontman who screams and tries to call it singing.
Show me on the doll where Led Zep hurt you. :banana:
Come on, Plant and Zep are legends, as are Rush.
 

JayR

Woodpecker
Rush at the Boston Garden in 1982 (Signals/New World Tour) was my second big rock show as a teenager. I've only bought one concert program/souvenir booklet in my life, and it was this one, which I've kept all these years:



That night they opened with "Spirit of Radio," but Geddy Lee changed the lyrics:


Way up in the nosebleed seats in the Garden with my best friend, still adjusting to the shock of actually seeing and hearing RUSH playing LIVE, our heads nearly exploded simultaneously when we heard Geddy sing "Some like to believe in the freedom of baseball." "HE CHANGED THE WORDS!"

It's one of those moments of my life I will never forget.

I saw them at least a dozen times after that and am really glad I flew to Atlanta to see them on the farewell R40 tour a few years ago. Fittingly, I met up in ATL with same very same friend --middle-aged now like me -- who saw them with me in Boston 33 years ago when we were over-excited teenagers with most of our lives ahead of us.

To this day I'm a hardcore music geek, but no band ever meant more to me than Rush. Thanks Neil.
 

Abelard Lindsey

Woodpecker
puckerman said:
Geddy Lee has a very memorable voice. You hear him and know exactly who it is.

Robert Plant is just another who hard rock frontman who screams and tries to call it singing.
I like Led Zeppelin as well. "Kashmir" is one of my all time favorite rock songs.
 

doc holliday

Pelican
Gold Member
JayR said:
Rush at the Boston Garden in 1982 (Signals/New World Tour) was my second big rock show as a teenager. I've only bought one concert program/souvenir booklet in my life, and it was this one, which I've kept all these years:



That night they opened with "Spirit of Radio," but Geddy Lee changed the lyrics:


Way up in the nosebleed seats in the Garden with my best friend, still adjusting to the shock of actually seeing and hearing RUSH playing LIVE, our heads nearly exploded simultaneously when we heard Geddy sing "Some like to believe in the freedom of baseball." "HE CHANGED THE WORDS!"

It's one of those moments of my life I will never forget.

I saw them at least a dozen times after that and am really glad I flew to Atlanta to see them on the farewell R40 tour a few years ago. Fittingly, I met up in ATL with same very same friend --middle-aged now like me -- who saw them with me in Boston 33 years ago when we were over-excited teenagers with most of our lives ahead of us.

To this day I'm a hardcore music geek, but no band ever meant more to me than Rush. Thanks Neil.

Boston Gaaaden, that's awesome. I saw a bunch of Bruins games there in the early 90s, such a great old stadium. The best were the obstructed view seats directly behind the steel girders which they'd sell at a reduced price. Rush in the Garden would have been a great show.
 

Rigsby

Pelican
Gold Member
Neil got a tough gig.

Don't know much about brain cancer, but I do know guys that have had it for years and they are still pretty much functioning, albeit under a ticking clock. A bit crotchety. To be expected I suppose. They were probably always assholes though, knowing them that well..

Not all assholes get brain cancer. But those that get brain cancer stand a good chance of becoming assholes. Correlation is not causation. But certain causations might have some correlations in there if you care to dig deep enough. Fuck 'em, they're just assholes!

Enjoy every sandwich motherfucker!


Cancer is a tough gig in itself.

But I made a sandwich today.

I went in to about 3 shops asking for a Prawn sandwich. None had one. It's ok. They never fucking have one. NO way to enjoy it. I went in to the ins and outs of not being able to get a fucking Prawn sandwich - playing the food poison angle all the way down to the fact that maybe, just maybe, they don't know how to make a decent Prawn sandwich, because, let's face it, it's easy to fuck this one up! And fuck it up they almost always do!

All good gals, took it with good humour. But then again, they were just relieved I hadn't come in to rob the shop, looking like I did: sunglasses under the clouds. Shoulders like a brick shit house. Clothes with old bits of food on (think Dan Aykroyd in Trading Places, minus the Salmon down the Father Xmas fronts of course).





So no Prawn sandwich!

Just as well.

Went and found some Prawns in the local supermarket. Expensive as fuck. But fuck it I was not going to be deterred. I worked it out that if things went according to plan, I could get TWO MOTHERFUCKING PRAWN SANDWICH'S out of this game. Top that Motherfuckers!

Ok, so 5 bucks for enough Prawns to fit two decent sangers! So farrie so goodie!




But the magic really lay in the fact I had a very nice French Vinaigrette already in the fridge. So I bought some nice crushed salad to go with that - plan being that I would just sprinkle a bit on top for the crunch, perhaps a bit on the side too.

But I was only beginning. I had only just begun!



I had a fresh pot of Mayo in the fridge and a fresh tube of Ketchup in the cupboard (never refrigerate Ketchup). And never mix your drinks!



Put the two together and a kind of thousand island dressing happens. And guess what? I actually had a Thousand Island dressing cooling in the small drawer of my fridge, but it was not needed. A sprinkle of Paprika on top was all that was called for.

No fresh Lemon alas. One can not have everything in this life. One needs to just crack on and make the best of it. God Dammit I was going to enjoy this sanger! Or die trying!

I liberally buttered the fresh white bread. I was just about set to go.

I stacked three of them in good fashion while I managed to include the fresh crunchy salad too. A hard trick. Took some time. The salad dressing was what made it what it was, like...

I really pushed the boat out with this one. Bordering on gluttony, but who would ever know? Not like I was going to write it all up on an international men's forum for having a good time. Oohh wait...


I mixed the Salt and Vinegar and Cheese and Onion crisps in to one bowl. I was salivating at what was about to come. Oh yes, this was one sandwich I was about to enjoy.

Still, I couldn't help wonder if there was something else needed. Not so much for gluttony's aspect, but more for the fact I'd kick myself if I left it out. Mmmm.... No, think I've got it all - napkins, cup of tea, everything in its place.

I bit in to it. It was like gorgeousness and gorgeousity all rolled in to one.

'Oh it was gorgeousness and gorgeosity made flesh'

The sandwich by itself was pure heaven, but the fact the crunchy salad with the French Dressing on, only added to it in spikes, was something else again.

Then a taste of Cheese and Onion crisp, perhaps a little taste of Salt and Vinegar crisp?

Exquisite.

Gourmet.

In its way.

You had to be there.


I know that 'enjoy every sandwich' is a metaphor. But sometimes, life is not a metaphor. It is literal.

And today I literally enjoyed it.


Enjoy every sandwich motherfucker!


Or maybe just make a sandwich for someone you love.

The napkin can be a nice touch.

You know.



Neil got a raw deal.


Some people live out their grief in many different ways, where they can at least. Some just keep it very private.

Neither one is less the warrior.

Those that keep it private.
Those that share their grief with the world.

Both of them share something in their own personal way.

As long as they are true to themselves and true to the memory of those around them.

It's hard to know what to say sometimes.

Only a fool would ever pretend to be a wise man.



Enjoy every sandwich.
 

JayR

Woodpecker
doc holliday said:
Boston Gaaaden, that's awesome. I saw a bunch of Bruins games there in the early 90s, such a great old stadium. The best were the obstructed view seats directly behind the steel girders which they'd sell at a reduced price. Rush in the Garden would have been a great show.
Yup, the Garden was cool. I got "obstructed view" seats at a discount for a B's game one time in the late '80s. They were situated right behind the net at one end of the rink. The seating tier above us extended out so far and hung down so low that the entire far 1/3rd of the rink was obscured unless we put our head between our knees! Great view of near-net action, not so much for the other end.

I do regret never having seen the Celtics play in the Gahdin during the Larry Bird era. Oh well.
 

Zep

Kingfisher
Good post.



Rigsby said:
Dusty said:
Neil was enormously influenced by Phil Collins’ drumming.

Most people have no idea that Phil Collins was a monster drummer before becoming a singer then pop superstar.

Neil was enormously influenced by Phil Collins’ drumming.


I didn't know that. Makes sense.



Most people have no idea that Phil Collins was a monster drummer before becoming a singer then pop superstar.


If you are a musician and play in a band, then you will know that Phil Collins is held in high regard by all drummers. Yes, he's a monster of a player. He's a virtuoso of/on the drums. To say he's not a major talent is like saying Jimi Hendrix couldn't play guitar. It just shows that the person making the statement should not be taken seriously.

Phil Collins is also a great songwriter. He can sing too. Oh, and he can act!

But more than that, he was John Martyn's friend, who he holed up with and got absolutely fucking wrecked with, when they were both going through their 'difficult' divorces. It takes a special kind of man to 'hole down' with someone like John Martyn, who, let's face it, is an arsehole's arsehole, if ever there was one.

Safe to say, Phil can play the drums, he can take a drink, he can write a tune, but more than all that, he's a bit of a rum fucker to be around, beyond what it takes to just be one of those 'successful' rock stars, who just happened to have 'lucked out'. Phil gets preferential treatment when he comes in to my studio, because he's just that good. He also gets preferential treatment when I'm looking for a good drinking buddy who won't bore me half to death.

And if you still don't believe me then look up his performance of Carpet Crawlers - who else could upstage Gabriel? The fact that he had an uncanny ability to mimic Gabriel's voice after he left Genesis is just one of those funny/unfunny twists of fate, that propelled the band and him to even greater stardom/success. The fact he was the drummer in the band before hand is just downright bizzare. Phil Collins made the best of what he had. And what he had was a lot. But that still doesn't explain his great success.

I could do the whole Patrick Bateman thing, but that's just so tiresome.

Phil Collins is a man who made it.

I understand why people hate him. Just like why people hate Mark Knopfler.

But I must stand up for and champion these rare talents.

I think maybe Phil over did it a bit when he was hanging around with John Martyn. You pays the piper and you takes your choice! Something like that.


But this isn't about Phil. It's about Neil!



What a strange thing.

On the day Neil died (I only found out today) I had a weird compulsion to check out his videos on youtube. I'm a lifelong Rush fan. But this was something else. Sometimes people turn to Neil for sage wisdom when life and love and men have failed to bring anything good or quantifiable to the table. I did not know this was the day he died. Weird that.

It was a Tuesday. The 7th of January.

I was beyond reach. My whole world having failed me. And I having failed it.

The story of Neil Peart is a good one. It's about a man having reached the heady tops of life. Then seeing his daughter die as a teenager in a car crash. Then his wife dying of cancer less than a year later. Somehow he carried on.

He used to carry around a motorbike in the Rush tour bus. When they docked he would get the bike out and just ride. He had no time for ordinary men who wanted to be his friend. "They don't even know me" was his cry.

He just wanted to get out there and meet ordinary people who had no idea of who he was, who had no idea of what the band "Rush" was. Who didn't want to know him because of who he was, or what they might be able to gain from the small experience, of just saying 'hello'.

He wanted anonymity. And in some small part he got it. Out on the road. Riding his bike.


I'm still trying to process his death. I don't do grief-whoring. But this is a strange one. Why did I decide to look him up and take counsel from him on the very day he died? The news had not broken yet.

This is what I took from all the youtube comments: He was a man most loved. In a very deep sense. Beyond that which even a supreme virtuoso like him would generally muster. Many and most spoke of his deep humanity. They called him "The Professor" - that's right! Because not only was he a master of the drum kit, he was also a master of the classics. He was a master of the humanities in every sense of the saying. People love Neil. He wasn't just well liked. He was well loved.

One of his gifts was the ability to talk without interruption and put in verbal place-holders like 'um' and 'ah' and 'you know' - though if you listen long enough he did use these, just in smaller quantities than pretty much any other human being. They didn't call him 'The Professor' for nothing.

Never a dull word dripped from his lips. Every rare syllable had meaning. Just like every beat of the drum. Every hit of the stick. It had to count!

This is my eulogy to the man. A man that not only touched me through his music, but also touched me with his deeper humanity and strength in the face of adversity. Why am I not surprised he kept his illness so quiet?

I still have no idea why I decided to check out his videos again at that particular time. I'm as weirded out by that fact as I am by the fact he has died.

To think, on that very day, I was partaking of his wisdom, and that was the very day he had shuffled off...


This is probably the best video you can watch of the man - it was taken when he was in his prime. He did not yet know that in a few months his daughter would die, and that his wife would die a few months after. Tragic.

We can observe. But not take a little joy in it. We are voyeurs to one's great tragedy. But we do not take anything from the fact, other than to say, quietly to oneself: Here I am, observing like a God, but as a Man, I just hope: I pray that never happens to me...


But do not revel in that dark night. There is much joy and light here.


This is part one:



This is part two:




If you play the drums, it will be a master class.

If you just want to see a man who has reached self-actualisation, according to Maslow's narrow definition, then have at it.

If you want to see a man in his prime before the Gods themselves smite him, then take a certain knowledge in that, if you must.




Some are born to move the world
To live their fantasies
But most of us just dream about
The things we'd like to be






R.I.P. The Professor.



It's not how fast you can go
The force goes into the flow
If you pick up the beat
You can forget about the heat
More than just survival
More than just a flash
More than just a dotted line
More than just a dash
It's a test of ultimate will
The heartbreak climb uphill
Got to pick up the pace
If you want to stay in the race
More than just blind ambition
More than just simple greed
More than just a finish line
Must feed this burning need
In the long run
From first to last
The peak is never passed
Something always fires the light
That gets in your eyes
One moment's high
And glory rolls on by
Like a streak of lightning
That flashes and fades
In the summer sky
Your meters may overload
You can rest at the side of the road
You can miss a stride
But nobody gets a free ride
More than high performance
More than just a spark
More than just the bottom line
Or a lucky shot in the dark
In the long run
You can do a lot in a lifetime
If you don't burn out too fast
You can make the most of the distance
First you need endurance
First you've got to last
 

Rigsby

Pelican
Gold Member
Zep said:
Good post.

Thanks Zep. I'm a bit in freeform mode at the moment. What with the insanity of Christmas and whatnot.

Good to see you still posting. I know we had our run ins together, but I can see there is no hard feelings.

It's good to be able to get along with those we have disagreements with, sometimes. I hate petty people.

I always enjoy your musical contributions to threads, even if I don't always respond.

Take care RVF brother!
 
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