Roosh Hour #67 – Michael Witcoff (Brother Augustine)

Do you mean the indissolubility of marriage or in specific cases whether a marriage was valid and an annulment (decree of nullity) can be granted The former is magisterial teaching. The second would be a reasoned conclusion.

The Catholic position is not that divorce is a sin, but that divorce is impossible. No power on earth can dissolve a validly contracted marriage between two spouses. The Church does not have the power to do this; not even the Pope can “bind and loose” here.
View attachment 32672
What happens in the case of adultery? Calvin granted divorce only on the grounds of adultery.
 

Pancras

Sparrow
What happens in the case of adultery? Calvin granted divorce only on the grounds of adultery.
895. What can one do if the husband is absolutely impossible to live with, or is guilty of adultery?
Brutal cruelty and ill treatment afford lawful grounds for separation, as also does adultery if it has not been condoned. But this separation does not break the bond of marriage. Death alone can do that, and neither is free to marry again whilst the other is still living. For grave reasons a Catholic can obtain ecclesiastical permission to have the separation rendered legal by a civil decree of Divorce in order to avoid legal difficulties, but this must be on the understanding that such a decree leaves neither party free to contract another marriage whilst the other party is still living.

892. Christ allowed Divorce for one reason. He said, "Whosoever shall put away his wife, except for fornication, maketh her to commit adultery." Matt. V., 32.
Christ allowed permanent separation if adultery be committed, but He does not allow Divorce and re-marriage in the sense you intend. When He said, "Whosoever shall put away his wife, except for the cause of fornication, maketh her to commit adultery, etc.," the sense He intended was this, "Whosoever shall put away his wife (I am not speaking of mere separation without re-marriage, for that is lawful in the case of fornication), but whosoever shall put away his wife ... he that marries her commits adultery." This is the only possible interpretation in the light of parallel passages. Thus St. Mark records Christ's words absolutely, "Whosoever shall put away his wife and marry another, committeth adultery against her." X., II. In St. Luke, also, we have the words without any parenthesis: "Every one that putteth away his wife, and marrieth another, committeth adultery, and he that marrieth her that is put away from her husband, committeth adultery." XVI., 18. St. Paul tells us clearly, "A woman is bound by the law as long as her husband liveth; but if her husband die, she is at liberty." I. Cor. VII., 39. For a Christian, then, there is no such thing as Divorce and re-marriage whilst the first partner is still living. Attempted re-marriage results in a sinful union only. You can have Divorce and give up Christianity, or you can have Christianity and give up Divorce. You cannot have both.

(From: “Radio Replies”, Vol. 1, Frs. Rumble and Carty, 1938.)
 
895. What can one do if the husband is absolutely impossible to live with, or is guilty of adultery?
Brutal cruelty and ill treatment afford lawful grounds for separation, as also does adultery if it has not been condoned. But this separation does not break the bond of marriage. Death alone can do that, and neither is free to marry again whilst the other is still living. For grave reasons a Catholic can obtain ecclesiastical permission to have the separation rendered legal by a civil decree of Divorce in order to avoid legal difficulties, but this must be on the understanding that such a decree leaves neither party free to contract another marriage whilst the other party is still living.

892. Christ allowed Divorce for one reason. He said, "Whosoever shall put away his wife, except for fornication, maketh her to commit adultery." Matt. V., 32.
Christ allowed permanent separation if adultery be committed, but He does not allow Divorce and re-marriage in the sense you intend. When He said, "Whosoever shall put away his wife, except for the cause of fornication, maketh her to commit adultery, etc.," the sense He intended was this, "Whosoever shall put away his wife (I am not speaking of mere separation without re-marriage, for that is lawful in the case of fornication), but whosoever shall put away his wife ... he that marries her commits adultery." This is the only possible interpretation in the light of parallel passages. Thus St. Mark records Christ's words absolutely, "Whosoever shall put away his wife and marry another, committeth adultery against her." X., II. In St. Luke, also, we have the words without any parenthesis: "Every one that putteth away his wife, and marrieth another, committeth adultery, and he that marrieth her that is put away from her husband, committeth adultery." XVI., 18. St. Paul tells us clearly, "A woman is bound by the law as long as her husband liveth; but if her husband die, she is at liberty." I. Cor. VII., 39. For a Christian, then, there is no such thing as Divorce and re-marriage whilst the first partner is still living. Attempted re-marriage results in a sinful union only. You can have Divorce and give up Christianity, or you can have Christianity and give up Divorce. You cannot have both.

(From: “Radio Replies”, Vol. 1, Frs. Rumble and Carty, 1938.)
I see the reasoning in that, but I do think, one could argue for divorce and remarriage if one party sins the marriage contract invalid.
 

tg[CIG]

Chicken
Man... this one got to me.

I just joined the Catholic Church last year. I've been going to the Latin Mass. I've been trying to read about Church History and the saints and the faith. So much providential stuff has happened to me in the last 22 months. But so much pain and sorrow too.

I just don't know what to think anymore. Vatican 2 never sat right with me, but there were ways to make sense of it (for a while at least... not so much the last 3 months or so).

"Francis is bad, but there have been bad popes before. At least Benedict was based. Well, I guess I'm a little uncomfortable with Benedict too, but JP2 is a Saint! That is without error... except what about ecumenism? And him knowing about McCarrick? And what about Assisi? And how is John the 23 a saint?" (and on and on and on).

How can I learn more about Orthodoxy without sinning (putting my faith in jeopardy according to the catechism). And on a personal level, I'm not sure how much time I have left, but I don't want to find myself outside the true Church. Nothing is more important than salvation. Yet, I'm no longer even confident that I know how to pray correctly or effectively.

Lord, have mercy on me, a sinner. I really do want to make You happy. I know I'm terrible at listening. I know I'm still a slave to many passions, but thank You for freeing me from many big ones as well.
 
Top