Russia Culture General

Stoyan

Kingfisher
Orthodox
This is the Siberian Riflemen's song, from the Russian Civil War. I found two versions of this song.





This is Drozdovsky's song, same melody but different lyrics.



This is the French version of the Siberian Riflemen's song, slightly different lyrics than the original, to make it sound good in the French language.



This is the German version of the Siberian Riflemen's song, slightly different lyrics than the original, to make it sound good in the German language.

 

Stoyan

Kingfisher
Orthodox
The Siberian Riflemen's song is based on an older Russki song, of the Zaporozhian Cossacks, "Marusya".



Which is it self based on an even more ancient Russki song, the song of Stenka Razin. The melody is played at a much slower pace here, so it sounds like a completely different song. However the lyrics of the Siberian Riflemen's song, and Marusya fit well onto this song's melody as wel.

 

Stoyan

Kingfisher
Orthodox
The Siberian Riflemen's song is also very similar to the Alexandrov's Choir song. The lyrics are obviously different.

 

911

Peacock
Catholic
Gold Member
If I get the chance to travel to Russia, I hope to go here as well. I like the traditional architecture as well.


This church is one of 25,000 churches across Russia that have been restored or entirely rebuilt under Putin the last two decades, while ancient churches are being burned down and desacrated across the West by satanists like Varg and higher-level people like the ones behind the arson of Notre-Dame de Paris.

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800-year old church in Bergen, Norway, burned down by Varg.
 

Stoyan

Kingfisher
Orthodox
This church is one of 25,000 churches across Russia that have been restored or entirely rebuilt under Putin the last two decades, while ancient churches are being burned down and desacrated across the West by satanists like Varg and higher-level people like the ones behind the arson of Notre-Dame de Paris.

800-year old church in Bergen, Norway, burned down by Varg.

Unfortunatley the Kizhi churches are only several few of the still extant ancient Russian wooden churches that remain, because of Russia's horrible turbulent history. Peter the Great, Napoleon Bonoparte, the Bolsheviks/Soviets, Adolf Hitler, all burned and destroyed the ancient Russian wooden churches. There are also many such churches that are in a state of disrepair and abandonment due to the de-ruralization of Russia.

https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/ar...-wooden-buildings-left-forgotten-forests.html

Speaking of Napoleon, this painting depicts his invasion of Russia. Here we see a Viking style stave church, which is apparently being burned by the French troops. I don't know of any extant Viking style stave churches in Russia now, but apparently they rather wide spread at that time. This architectural style goes back thousands of years, and such buildings can be found even in Thailand as Buddhist temples! Indeed, Christianity is standing on the shoulders of much more ancient spiritual traditions.

iu


Please see this my post and open the spoiler.


After the Napoleonic war, Russian soldiers didn't burn down the Notre-Dame de Paris. Whereas for the French army we have this example above, and also the great fire of Moscow, which destroyed countless Russian architectural monuments. Western official pseudo historians claim that the Russians themselves burned Moscow, which doesn't even make sense. It was done by the invading army.
 
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Cynllo

Woodpecker
Other Christian


Invidious - https://yewtu.be/watch?v=pjSNveSVwEs

Been to this city - Lipetsk, but it wasn't really like that. Maybe it's changed in the last 8 years. But it was quite provincial. I walked quite a long way through the doldrums and at one point this man who looked like that mad Italian referee was looking at me extremely intensely as if he wanted to kill me. Also got lots of looks there. Not sure why. But it's not a normal place.

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I found it to be one of the most interesting places I have been to in Russia. It reminded me a bit of Poland, where I've seen some very family-friendly places. It also reminded me or rural EE, where people are quite simple and don't know much about Hollyweird, nuevaeu prostitution, homoism etc. They have a very different mentality, which is more natural.
 

Pantheon

Robin
Orthodox
The most impressive person in the history of Sweden is a woman from the Viking Age. Born as a viking princess, later on Grand Duchess of Kiev, founder of a monastery in Novgorod/Holmgaard and defender of Orthodox Christianity in the East.

St. Anna of Novgorod

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Stoyan

Kingfisher
Orthodox
Reminds me of Anna of Kiev, the Russian princess, daughter of King Yaroslav the Wise of Kiev and Novgorod. She married King Henry I of France, and so she became the queen of France. She was an avid writer, and many of her works have survived to the present day. In her letters to her father Yaroslav, she described the contemporary Paris as just "a big village" in comparison to the grad ancient Russian cities of Kiev and Novgorod.

iu
 

Pantheon

Robin
Orthodox
Reminds me of Anna of Kiev, the Russian princess, daughter of King Yaroslav the Wise of Kiev and Novgorod. She married King Henry I of France, and so she became the queen of France. She was an avid writer, and many of her works have survived to the present day. In her letters to her father Yaroslav, she described the contemporary Paris as just "a big village" in comparison to the grad ancient Russian cities of Kiev and Novgorod.

I believe she is literally the daughter of St Anna of Novgorod, who was the wife of King Yaroslav.
 

Pantheon

Robin
Orthodox
This is Harald Hardrada, Viking King of Norway (1015 – 1066).

He was a military commander in Kiev Rus and joined the famous Varangian Guard protecting the East Roman Emperor in Constantinople (Miklagard). Harald Hardrada brought the Orthodox Christian faith and adherence to Norway.

As the Christian church was in the midst of the historic split and the Catholic church began its journey separate from the Orthodox at this point, Harald Hardrada sided with the Orthodox view that he had observed in Kiev and Constantinople. So it seems, since he imported Orthodox priests from Russia to come to Norway at the time.

Norse Christianity was Orthodox in tone and appearance from the beginning, and the last of Norway’s pre-schism Christian kings, Harald Hardrada, was openly rebuked by Rome for adhering to Eastern traditions.

On a side note, he was married to Elisiv of Kiev (daughter of aforementioned King Yaroslav I and St Anna of Novgorod), who became the Queen of Norway under his reign.

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