Russian Orthodox Church

Muscovite

Robin
What is the Russian Orthodox take on certain aspects that are well embedded in traditional Catholicism (pro-life, large families)?

Orthodox Church to Russian gov’t: ‘Abortion must be made equal to murder’

There are also lots of articles regarding marriage and family in Orthodox Christianity in the link below.
 

Enigma

Hummingbird
Gold Member
To add to what the others have said, one difference between Orthodoxy and Roman Catholicism is that Orthodox priests are allowed to marry and have children. They just have to be married (or take monastic vows) before becoming priests.

So, you have priests like Fr. Josiah Trenham, who has 10 kids.


He and Priestmonk Kosmas both have quite a few talks on Orthodox marriage and family life that myself and other guys on the forum have found helpful.

 

ABeast

Robin
I went to my first Orthodox service today, a beautiful little Russian Orthodox church. It was cool, but way more alien that I expected having only experienced modern services. I did attend a Latin mass in High School for my Latin class, but that is about it. It's very cool to be able to be a part of a tradition that has been passed down from another time, but I wish there was something to tell me if I'm doing it right. In the evangelical churches they give you all sorts of pamphlets and stuff if you are new, the only thing I saw here was a piece of paper on the wall with rules for children. Refreshing, but also intimidating!
 

Roosh

Cardinal
I went to my first Orthodox service today, a beautiful little Russian Orthodox church. It was cool, but way more alien that I expected having only experienced modern services. I did attend a Latin mass in High School for my Latin class, but that is about it. It's very cool to be able to be a part of a tradition that has been passed down from another time, but I wish there was something to tell me if I'm doing it right. In the evangelical churches they give you all sorts of pamphlets and stuff if you are new, the only thing I saw here was a piece of paper on the wall with rules for children. Refreshing, but also intimidating!
A good first step is to get a copy of the service book to follow along. It does take time to get used to it.
 

budoslavic

Owl
Gold Member
To add to what the others have said, one difference between Orthodoxy and Roman Catholicism is that Orthodox priests are allowed to marry and have children. They just have to be married (or take monastic vows) before becoming priests.
...

I can confirm this since my Orthodox Church has the same rules: Orthodox seminarians are allowed to get married before becoming ordained. (They are allowed to have children as well.)

For years, it's always a hot button issue between Orthodox and Catholic.
 
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I can confirm this since my Orthodox Church has the same rules: Orthodox seminarians are allowed to get married before becoming ordained. (They are allowed to have children as well.)

For years, it's always a hot button issue between Orthodox and Catholic.

That's interesting - I know at the time of the schism the married priesthood was one of Rome's reasons for separating from us. But at least in the US, they've accepted the possibility that a married man can be validly ordained. I know two former Anglican clergy who were allowed to keep their wives when becoming RC priests.
 

DanielH

Pelican
I went to my first Orthodox service today, a beautiful little Russian Orthodox church. It was cool, but way more alien that I expected having only experienced modern services. I did attend a Latin mass in High School for my Latin class, but that is about it. It's very cool to be able to be a part of a tradition that has been passed down from another time, but I wish there was something to tell me if I'm doing it right. In the evangelical churches they give you all sorts of pamphlets and stuff if you are new, the only thing I saw here was a piece of paper on the wall with rules for children. Refreshing, but also intimidating!
My church had liturgy books but took them away due to covid. I bet if you ask the priest he can give you one so you can follow along.
 

ABeast

Robin
So my new friend who I went to the Russian Orthodox service with is in trouble with her spiritual mentor (a Catholic sister) for going to a non-Vatican approved house of worship. She is saying that they don't do a real mass, something about the Eucharist being not the same. I was under the impression that the mass is more or less the same idea in both East and West, how far off am I?

Should I just drop it and not attempt to go see the Orthodox monastery with her? I certainly don't know much about Christianity, but I do have a pretty good cult-radar from being involved in some myself. It rubs me the wrong way when someone who is new in town is getting told by a person several States away that she will be cut-off forever if she goes anywhere near an Orthodox site.
 

DanielH

Pelican
So my new friend who I went to the Russian Orthodox service with is in trouble with her spiritual mentor (a Catholic sister) for going to a non-Vatican approved house of worship. She is saying that they don't do a real mass, something about the Eucharist being not the same. I was under the impression that the mass is more or less the same idea in both East and West, how far off am I?

Should I just drop it and not attempt to go see the Orthodox monastery with her? I certainly don't know much about Christianity, but I do have a pretty good cult-radar from being involved in some myself. It rubs me the wrong way when someone who is new in town is getting told by a person several States away that she will be cut-off forever if she goes anywhere near an Orthodox site.
That's strange because the official Vatican position is that the Orthodox Church has valid sacraments. Interestingly the Orthodox Church does not necessarily reciprocate that belief. I'd suggest continuing to go to Orthodox Churches.
 

ABeast

Robin
That's strange because the official Vatican position is that the Orthodox Church has valid sacraments. Interestingly the Orthodox Church does not necessarily reciprocate that belief. I'd suggest continuing to go to Orthodox Churches.
It seems odd to me also. I don't know how much of it is my projection of the Catholic church, but from what I hear their leadership can be manipulative. I don't know why someone in a spiritual guidance role would be telling her that the Orthodox rite is some kind of Protestantism.
 

NickK

Robin
That's a case of a kettle calling a pot black.
Her "spiritual mentor" is unfortunately a victim of heresy.
The bisquit they eat is nothing more than that, a bisquit. Not to be confused with the Body and Blood of Christ offered in the Church.
 

Aboulia

Woodpecker
So my new friend who I went to the Russian Orthodox service with is in trouble with her spiritual mentor (a Catholic sister) for going to a non-Vatican approved house of worship. She is saying that they don't do a real mass, something about the Eucharist being not the same. I was under the impression that the mass is more or less the same idea in both East and West, how far off am I?

Should I just drop it and not attempt to go see the Orthodox monastery with her? I certainly don't know much about Christianity, but I do have a pretty good cult-radar from being involved in some myself. It rubs me the wrong way when someone who is new in town is getting told by a person several States away that she will be cut-off forever if she goes anywhere near an Orthodox site.

The Orthodox Divine Liturgy is radically different from the Roman Catholic mass. There's many elements of the same thing, but the amount of symbolism and things to meditate on are far less in the Roman mass. Orthodox services are an attempt to portray (not quite the right word) heaven on earth. It's why there's no money being passed around during church services, it has a place in life on earth since earth is inhabited by fallen man, but inside the church it's only ever offered in the narthex (entrance), it's never in the main body (nave), since money is a creation of fallen man, who is heavily invested in his own interests. The nave is where the congregation gather together to worship God and ask forgiveness from one another, and to God for their offences, and seek to be reunited with God.

In the middle of Roman Catholic/Protestant services however, the collection (extortion) plate is always in view of all, and each can see if each another contributes, and potentially how much if it's not in an envelope, and people are dropping large bills. To me, it always seemed like this brings forth the very real potential of judging your neighbour. This always bothered me, as I started in Protestantism, and moved to Roman Catholicism (never becoming a full Roman Catholic), before I became Orthodox.

The "Eucharist" in Orthodox services, has the body and blood in a single cup, as you've probably seen. The Roman Catholics have it separately, and the "body of Christ" is the form of a cracker for them, handed out more traditionally on the tongue, but it's now common practice to take it in the hand.

You can always invite her, be cordial about it, no matter if she accepts or not. DanielH is right, and you can look it up, and show her that the Vatican accepts Orthodox sacraments, you can always tell her to feel free not to participate in the service if there are some ongoing during your monastery visit. It's what Orthodox do during non-Orthodox services, when they find themselves in them, like when an Orthodox person goes to a funeral of a non-Orthodox friend.

Just please don't describe anything as heretical to anybody, unless you can precisely describe why certain beliefs are heretical, and you can expound on proper teaching, it's best to stay away from that sort of language.
 

ABeast

Robin
Just please don't describe anything as heretical to anybody, unless you can precisely describe why certain beliefs are heretical, and you can expound on proper teaching, it's best to stay away from that sort of language.
I don't even know what heretical means, really. I imagine it includes plenty of what I think I know.
 

Muscovite

Robin

budoslavic

Owl
Gold Member
The Litany of Fervent Supplication by Alexander Gretchaninov (Liturgy of St. John Chrysostom No 4.)


Video description:
Sung by Canctus Sacred Music Ensemble under the direction of Ludmila Arshavskaya. Priest - Father Alexei Godunov.
Unlike the Great litany, in which petitions are for the whole world, all groups of people in all places, in the Litany of Fervent Supplication the petitions are specifically for people who, either directly or indirectly, are involved in the local church community, the ruling bishop(s), clergy, civil authorities and so on.

At Daily Vespers and daily matins, the Litany is conducted at the end of the service.

Priest: Let us say with all our soul, and with all our mind, let us say.
Choir: Lord, have mercy
Priest: Lord, Almighty, God of our fathers, we pray Thee, hearken and have mercy.
Choir: Lord, have mercy. Priest: Have mercy on us, O God, according to Thy great mercy, we pray Thee, hearken and have mercy.
Choir: Lord, have mercy, Lord, have mercy, Lord, have mercy.
Priest: Furthermore, we pray for the honorable Orthodox patriarchs and bishops, and for all our brethren in Christ.
Choir: Lord, have mercy, Lord, have mercy, Lord, have mercy. Priest: Furthermore, we pray for the God-protected Russian land and for its salvation.
Choir: Lord, have mercy, Lord, have mercy, Lord, have mercy.
Priest: Furthermore, we pray for the blessed and ever-memorable founders of this holy temple, and for all our fathers and brethren, the Orthodox departed, who lie here and throughout the world.
Choir: Lord, have mercy, Lord, have mercy, Lord, have mercy.
Priest: Furthermore, we pray for mercy, life, peace, health, salvation, pardon and remission of sins of the servants of God, the brethren of this holy temple.
Choir: Lord, have mercy, Lord, have mercy, Lord, have mercy.
Priest: Furthermore, we pray for those who hear fruit and do good works in this holy and all- honorable temple, for those who labor, for those who sing, and for all the people here present, who await Thy great and rich mercy.
Choir: Lord, have mercy, Lord, have mercy, Lord, have mercy.
 

Muscovite

Robin
The Spokesman for the Orthodox Patriarchate of Moscow said that people who uphold ideas such as Joe Biden should be arrested.
"As for Biden's initiative that an eight-year-old has the right to change sex, I consider such a statement a blasphemy. I think people who promote such ideas should be imprisoned, because, in my view, this is a crime. To understand how all this happens, just go to the website of a clinic that offers such services and read how sex reassignment surgery works. Your hair will fall out from what you see or read there. Therefore, for an adult - Such an operation is nothing more than mutilation of a person. The submission of children to such operations is a crime, which must be followed by criminal punishment, as well as the propaganda of such operations." - Head of the Department for Foreign Relations of the Orthodox Patriarchate of Moscow, Orthodox Metropolitan of Volokolamsk Hillarion.
 
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