Self-defense thread

presidentcarter

Ostrich
Gold Member
It's been posted before but worth posting again.

If you're talking self defense you're talking Little Dark.

Here's some footage of Little Dark defending himself ('Mike' in the video):

 
Certainly the best thing to do in a street fight is avoid it. As the video above shows, there are too many unknowns. Even in a one-on-one scenario, you might be faced with someone who has no qualms about killing you.

That said, learning mma from a legit trainer and doing real sparring is invaluable for knowing how to handle yourself in a physical confrontation. Grappling is huge and cannot be overlooked. But there is a huge psychological component to stand-up sparring that can only be learned through doing.

Watching a youtube video or interview with the world's greatest boxer wont teach you what it's like to get punched, or what your striking range is, etc. So many questions are best learned through practice, and training with a skilled opponent.
 

JonW

Chicken
I think what’s most important is not lying to yourself. Fantasies about what you face in violent situations can hinder you when it really comes your way, if not put you in the way in the first place. Fantasies provided in training, whether purposeful or not, can have terribly real consequences.

Avoidance, decent social skills, some knowledge or real-world violence, some foresight, and smart decisions are the best for self-defense. But you can only control yourself, not others, and if you need a stronger response than words you need it badly.

Running is a good option if it is available, but what if it isn’t. Say, you’re with your family and they rely on you to protect them? Or the situation is in your home? Or you can’t leave for any number of reasons?

Weapons, firearms in particular, are better than being unarmed and one should learn how to use them. With firearms, range training is only part of the practical use, learning only on the range is like only learning forms for empty hand arts. It doesn't cover mindset, tactics, cover vs concealment, when to shoot vs not, and much more. Complimentary empty hand skills are also a necessity, and not just for retention.


The numbers take from the drill are taken from averages, you and your situation could be very different.

Besides the reasons above, not all self-defense situations justify lethal force and you should be prepared for those situations as well. So if you're serious about being prepared you should train in empty hand skills as well for those situations. Besides, what if you couldn't take your gun to the area an altercation happens in?

It should go without saying that if you carry a weapon you have a greater responsibility to make smart decisions over stupid ones.

While martial arts styles certainly have their strengths and weaknesses the quality of the instructor is more important than the quality of the style and you probably don’t live in a place with access to instructors in all the different styles around. So don’t get too caught up in the style wars.
 
Good KM training includes “stress inoculation.” That means a plastic bag tied over your head while other people punch and kick you for 60 seconds. That means one guy trying to choke you while another tries to hit you with a bat while a third tries to punch you - all at the same time. Even with years of training scenarios like that are still stressful and the adrenaline can make you forget technique pretty easily, but the poster above is right that you can’t learn anything that will matter just from watching and not practicing it.
 
I've been on and off doing kickboxing for years and it didn't help me in a robbery-type situation one bit

If someone ambushes you or comes at you with a weapon you run as fast as you can. Or you hand over your belongings. Simple as.

Really, everything else is just projecting. I have been in a situation like this at least 5 times. Can't prepare in any way for a 14 year old drugged up kid with nothing to lose to suddenly jump on you clenching a rusty kitchen knife

Most of self-defense is paying attention, preparing for and evading danger:

The criminal was already sizing you up beforehand before he laid his ambush on you.

Situational awareness is a must that will allow you to slip away and make yourself too hard to ambush before he decides to come after you.
 
Something else that needs to be noted, you need to figure out the look and body language that says "fuck with me and you die". Ever seen those giant Samoans that look like they could play football quarterback and basketball offense? Those guys walk like killer whales (even when their genuinely friendly) and almost no ones fucks with them.

If you can learn to give off that same vibe you'll find that life just gets easier.
 
@Psalm27

Going to the ground worked for you because the other bully didn't kick you in the head.
I actually had this situation. The last fight I was in 13 years ago I was 5'7 140 and the guy was 6'2 over 200. The only advantage I had is that he was drunk and when he went swinging for me I immediately went for a double leg take down. I still remember he was confused about what I was doing but once on the ground there was no size advantage. I switched to a rear naked choke and was planning on putting him to sleep. At that moment feeling hitting in the back of my head I looked up and my eye met the front end of someone's boot. Next thing I knew I was running down the street being chased by 4 guys. In hind sight I would have deescalated the situation but my ego told me I could take this guy. Moral of the story if you face a bigger guy take him but do not stay there as you are a sitting duck. Instead if you take him down then get up and try to get out of the situation as quick as possible.
 
A case in point when a person gets too far in the heat of the moment and ends up paying the price:

Too bad there was sound effect trivializing the situation. But that's one example.
 

Psalm27

Woodpecker
Gold Member
A case in point when a person gets too far in the heat of the moment and ends up paying the price:

Too bad there was sound effect trivializing the situation. But that's one example.
Well that guy wasn't trying to de-escalate or run, quite the opposite, and he had no distance management, he just stood there and took the punches. Not very smart at all.
 
Well that guy wasn't trying to de-escalate or run, quite the opposite, and he had no distance management, he just stood there and took the punches. Not very smart at all.

He had a big mouth and thought he was tough by talking tough. But since he wasn't far enough to pay attention to the other guy's movements he was blindsided and repeatedly stunned by successive hits to the jaw and head.

Edit: When the other guy is ready to take the swing his body will often telegraph his intentions. His footing and slight movements of the body would suddenly accommodate the movement split seconds before the swing comes about.

So keeping far enough and paying attention to the other guy's body is a must especially in a heated situation. Letting him close the distance is already making it too easy for him.

Of course a good martial arts training is a must. But it would need some modifications to make it effective:



The importance of ending the fight ASAP if it comes to that as simply and efficiently as possible. The Website also have pages on the Legal issues that come with violence and also that there will be the potential for revenge even if you do win.
 
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stugatz

Pelican
A case in point when a person gets too far in the heat of the moment and ends up paying the price:

Too bad there was sound effect trivializing the situation. But that's one example.
I saw that a few days ago - talk about clueless. His ego is so big, the guy has him on the ground before he knows what hit him, and then he gets kicked in the head twice trying to get up. Either he got blindsided by a guy who hits like a freight train and had no chance, or he's never been in a real fight, ever.
 

Gimlet

Kingfisher
Dude on the right stepped backwards at the beginning, and held position for 5 seconds. He clearly stepped back to be at swinging distance. Then right before the first punch his left foot goes back. This is all easy for me to see as I sit in a chair in my office. But if your pride and mouth are going, it must be hard to notice the clear indications that the beat down is coming.
 
Dude on the right stepped backwards at the beginning, and held position for 5 seconds. He clearly stepped back to be at swinging distance. Then right before the first punch his left foot goes back. This is all easy for me to see as I sit in a chair in my office. But if your pride and mouth are going, it must be hard to notice the clear indications that the beat down is coming.
Pride goeth before the fall.
 

budoslavic

Owl
Gold Member
A case in point when a person gets too far in the heat of the moment and ends up paying the price:

Too bad there was sound effect trivializing the situation. But that's one example.
When two guys get in each other's face up close in a stare down contest, peripheral vision goes out the window. Around the 5 second mark, watch how the attacker quickly dropped his left foot back before throwing a "blindside" hook punch.

This is why a man needs to control the distance and space between himself and the attacker for better peripheral vision awareness.

Note: "Peripheral vision awareness" is when one can see or detect an attacker's movement (from an arm length/mid-range distance) - i.e., clenched fist, jaw tightening, foot stepping forward or back, hand reaching into his pocket, etc.
 
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