Share your 9-5 workplace stories...

DelMarMisty

Woodpecker
Woman
Orthodox
I work a 9-5 job in academia. I don't like it at all and trying to get out and build my own business on the side. After a long time working in corporate and academia, I still find it insufferable to deal with office politics, passive aggressive emails, false niceties, polite conversation, empty talk. When I was in a physical office, it was worse. The deadness in the air, people's discomfort, the white lights, grey carpets, the buzzing sound of the air-conditioner. I find women in meetings tend to go over and over and over about the same point. People want to one-up each other. Somewhere deep down, they realise what they are doing is empty, but most have no God so don't really know what else to do so they delude themselves into thinking what they're doing has meaning. I guess?

Things I have noticed:

-There is always that one admin robot lady that follows orders and tries to instil this cult rule following on everyone
-The whole "we are a family" speech at Christmas parties
-The predictable jokes
-The innovators who 'innovate' the same cr*p
-Everything is about data

After a day at work, I feel robbed and washed out most of the time, as though my God given senses are used up and wasted on demonic entities i.e. corporations.

This piece by Bukowski sums this up pretty well.

8-12-86

Hello John:

Thanks for the good letter. I don’t think it hurts, sometimes, to remember where you came from. You know the places where I came from. Even the people who try to write about that or make films about it, they don’t get it right. They call it “9 to 5.” It’s never 9 to 5, there’s no free lunch break at those places, in fact, at many of them in order to keep your job you don’t take lunch. Then there’s OVERTIME and the books never seem to get the overtime right and if you complain about that, there’s another sucker to take your place.

You know my old saying, “Slavery was never abolished, it was only extended to include all the colors.”

And what hurts is the steadily diminishing humanity of those fighting to hold jobs they don’t want but fear the alternative worse. People simply empty out. They are bodies with fearful and obedient minds. The color leaves the eye. The voice becomes ugly. And the body. The hair. The fingernails. The shoes. Everything does.

As a young man I could not believe that people could give their lives over to those conditions. As an old man, I still can’t believe it. What do they do it for? Sex? TV? An automobile on monthly payments? Or children? Children who are just going to do the same things that they did?

Early on, when I was quite young and going from job to job I was foolish enough to sometimes speak to my fellow workers: “Hey, the boss can come in here at any moment and lay all of us off, just like that, don’t you realize that?”

They would just look at me. I was posing something that they didn’t want to enter their minds.

Now in industry, there are vast layoffs (steel mills dead, technical changes in other factors of the work place). They are layed off by the hundreds of thousands and their faces are stunned:

“I put in 35 years…”

“It ain’t right…”

“I don’t know what to do…”

They never pay the slaves enough so they can get free, just enough so they can stay alive and come back to work. I could see all this. Why couldn’t they? I figured the park bench was just as good or being a barfly was just as good. Why not get there first before they put me there? Why wait?

I just wrote in disgust against it all, it was a relief to get the shit out of my system. And now that I’m here, a so-called professional writer, after giving the first 50 years away, I’ve found out that there are other disgusts beyond the system.

I remember once, working as a packer in this lighting fixture company, one of the packers suddenly said: “I’ll never be free!”

One of the bosses was walking by (his name was Morrie) and he let out this delicious cackle of a laugh, enjoying the fact that this fellow was trapped for life.

So, the luck I finally had in getting out of those places, no matter how long it took, has given me a kind of joy, the jolly joy of the miracle. I now write from an old mind and an old body, long beyond the time when most men would ever think of continuing such a thing, but since I started so late I owe it to myself to continue, and when the words begin to falter and I must be helped up stairways and I can no longer tell a bluebird from a paperclip, I still feel that something in me is going to remember (no matter how far I’m gone) how I’ve come through the murder and the mess and the moil, to at least a generous way to die.

To not to have entirely wasted one’s life seems to be a worthy accomplishment, if only for myself.

yr boy,

Hank

...and I love this too "“They speak of simple things, so simple you think they are joking”.


and this by Bukowski too:

I always resented all the years, the hours, the
minutes I gave them as a working stiff, it
actually hurt my head, my insides, it made me
dizzy and a bit crazy — I couldn’t understand the
murdering of my years
yet my fellow workers gave no signs of
agony, many of them even seemed satisfied, and
seeing them that way drove me almost as crazy as
the dull and senseless work.
the workers submitted.
the work pounded them to nothingness, they were
scooped-out and thrown away.
I resented each minute, every minute as it was mutilated
and nothing relieved the monotonous ever- structure.
I drank away my few leisure hours. I worked for decades.
I lived with the worst of women, they killed what the job failed to kill.
I knew that I was dying. something in me said, go ahead, die, sleep, become them, accept.
then something else in me said, no, save the tiniest bit. it needn’t be much, just a spark. a spark can set a whole forest on fire. just a spark. save it.
I think I did. I’m glad I did. what a lucky damned thing.”


What are your stories?
 
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Towgunner

Kingfisher
Hi DelMar, this is a great post. Thank you for sharing. I very much liked your imagery above i.e. the white lights and buzzing air conditioner. I've worked on Wall Street for my entire career, except for my time in the Marines. What you describe above is just as true here as it is in academia. Since you mentioned the females, we get the worst kinds here. That said, there are many women that belong, and guess what, they're not uppity, obnoxious, entitled etc. There's just not a lot of these women, which is to say the others got in through affirmative action.

I think the most egregious thing to come out of corporate America was their adoption of social awareness and all that stuff. This both makes my skin crawl and it fills me with electric rage. And it should. How dare these institutions to take sides on contentious political issues. Worse still, effectively, these companies are trying to become the locus of "morality" in our society. Again, this enrages me. Because, these are for-profit institutions, therefore, they exist to make money, period. All other issues, especially the well-being of their employees are distant priorities if at all. Apropos to Bukoski's statements, if they truly are such paragons of morality then there would be NO layoffs ever. In fact, there would be no firings ever. But then again, they'd donate all of their money to the needy (and follow Christ), a la the Gospel when the rich man approaches Jesus.

But, this isn't going to happen. It gets worse. Now, my personal beliefs, opinions, and even values can get me terminated if I go against the company's "values", for lack of a better word. I believe marriage is between a man and a woman, period full stop. That alone has gotten people fired. Its a death sentence if you openly espouse it.

My personal political beliefs et al, are none of my employers BUSINESS! I can see a lot of lawsuits coming. Good. Let them bankrupt these evil companies and let Andrew Torba's new parallel society take the market share.
 
I have so many over the years and hope to share them here over time. One thing I can say is that the work environment was so much fun in the 1990's and early 2000's. I actually looked forward to going into work. My work experience up until 2008 was really enjoyable. It was a different America.

Politics were either not in the office or about nonstarter debates like "should a highway be built through the land that is currently reserved for natives" and such unimportant topics like that. We went out to lunch together. We poked fun at each other in a male bonding/locker room environment. Even the women joined in and seemed to enjoy it. And the people who didn't like it simply didn't last long.

When Obama started his presidential candidacy that is when it all seemed to sour. Add in the economic melt down and this radical Marxist spewing hate of the white working class and of small business and the whole thing started to unwind. The bozo didn't just win, he won in big fashion. Afterwards the tattle tales got embolden. CYA was the way of the world. The more fun/outspoken were eventually let go or left on their own and replaced with weird bug men/women college grads that had no idea how things were just prior to them. After that it was the diversity initiative, which we all know just means get rid of white working class men by any means possible, even if that is work them into the ground and make them want to quit.

I am sure there are a lot of good stories, both before the rot of Obama and after. Before being the fun that was had. After being the clown world exposure of promotions of people unqualified and the qualified let go and chased out. Not that most large corporations care, they probably get a tax break or govt. kickbacks to run an inefficient but diverse company.
 

Ah_Tibor

Kingfisher
Woman
Orthodox
I've always worked in restaurants/kitchens with the exception of being a preschool "teacher" for a few years (and some other short term jobs). Never had much desire to work in an office. Even though you get certain privileges (regular hours, more time off, less things thrown at you) the emotional trade-off seems to be pretty big.
 

Ah_Tibor

Kingfisher
Woman
Orthodox
I think the most egregious thing to come out of corporate America was their adoption of social awareness and all that stuff.

My guess is a lot of it is "agree and amplify." A lot of the huge corporations (the moneyed generational ones) did bad things in the past and are scared of the chnaging landscape, so they go overboard. Gamble of Proctor and Gamble was a big push behind sterilization campaigns in Puerto Rico (which also makes wonder about their products). So now they have tranny commercials to tell you that you, you're the problem.

Also it's probably a "I'm so glad I'm not a Delta" sort of thing. Why complain about your job when you're confronted with so much suffering every day? And the elites have always been weird with similar concerns, I think they probably changed the general social environments to fit their tastes.
 

Towgunner

Kingfisher
My guess is a lot of it is "agree and amplify." A lot of the huge corporations (the moneyed generational ones) did bad things in the past and are scared of the chnaging landscape, so they go overboard. Gamble of Proctor and Gamble was a big push behind sterilization campaigns in Puerto Rico (which also makes wonder about their products). So now they have tranny commercials to tell you that you, you're the problem.

Also it's probably a "I'm so glad I'm not a Delta" sort of thing. Why complain about your job when you're confronted with so much suffering every day? And the elites have always been weird with similar concerns, I think they probably changed the general social environments to fit their tastes.
Yes. I think the connection is also through the state's, federal and local, increasingly size, scope and, therefore, influence on all things including business. Tax subsidies play a big hand in this. Diversity milestones include tax incentives. Also, let's not forget about the impact of loose monetary policy. This has engendered a lot of bad outcomes and created a lot of perversions. Low-interest rates require money printing, which inflates the equities markets. A CFO borrows at these low rates and uses the proceeds to buy back their shares, which helps to bolster the stock price, keeping it relatively stable, elevated, and, for the most part, always going up. This makes the equity side of the balance sheet bigger and the liability side, which includes the recent debt, smaller in proportion, even if it grows. The increase in value of the equity effectively pays for the debt they took on many times over. The business becomes bigger as a result, at least on paper and it was all due to a relatively riskless and easy-to-implement financial strategy. A CEO doesn't have to worry too much about driving growth through new products or initiatives. These things are costly and uncertain, rather, the CFO's "brilliant" financial shenanigans can do this by signing a contract. "Win-win" as they would say. What's this got to do with their "social activism"? Well, it's yet another reason for a company to toe the line. It beholds them all the more to the state, who obliges by keeping rates low ad infinitum. This means the state can make more demands on them. At present, I think publicly traded companies have become social utilities. I know of Fortune 100 companies that have implemented hiring policies to ensure that 50% of all hires going forward are "diverse", which means non-white and not male. That also means they're not hiring for merit or competency any longer. This will result in catastrophe, but, for the moment that "commitment" is rewarded with political graff, i.e., contracts granted or zoning approved or lax anti-trust policies. Over time, the lines between state and business become ever more blurred and combined. And that's where we are today.
 

IconWriter

Sparrow
Woman
Orthodox
I did that for a year as an insurance rater, and then another year or two in a library. I could not stand it. The mundane paper-pushing! So I followed my "passion" as an artist, and thanks to my loving, supportive husband, was able to bring in some "fun money" for decades. We lived as well as we wished, as didn't desire the "high life" of concerts, exotic vacations, etc. but focused on our family and saved to send our kids to college. No regrets. Follow your loves in life, do what you love to do. Life is short, uncertain, and you only have one.
 

DelMarMisty

Woodpecker
Woman
Orthodox
Hi DelMar, this is a great post. Thank you for sharing. I very much liked your imagery above i.e. the white lights and buzzing air conditioner. I've worked on Wall Street for my entire career, except for my time in the Marines. What you describe above is just as true here as it is in academia. Since you mentioned the females, we get the worst kinds here. That said, there are many women that belong, and guess what, they're not uppity, obnoxious, entitled etc. There's just not a lot of these women, which is to say the others got in through affirmative action.

I think the most egregious thing to come out of corporate America was their adoption of social awareness and all that stuff. This both makes my skin crawl and it fills me with electric rage. And it should. How dare these institutions to take sides on contentious political issues. Worse still, effectively, these companies are trying to become the locus of "morality" in our society. Again, this enrages me. Because, these are for-profit institutions, therefore, they exist to make money, period. All other issues, especially the well-being of their employees are distant priorities if at all. Apropos to Bukoski's statements, if they truly are such paragons of morality then there would be NO layoffs ever. In fact, there would be no firings ever. But then again, they'd donate all of their money to the needy (and follow Christ), a la the Gospel when the rich man approaches Jesus.

But, this isn't going to happen. It gets worse. Now, my personal beliefs, opinions, and even values can get me terminated if I go against the company's "values", for lack of a better word. I believe marriage is between a man and a woman, period full stop. That alone has gotten people fired. Its a death sentence if you openly espouse it.

My personal political beliefs et al, are none of my employers BUSINESS! I can see a lot of lawsuits coming. Good. Let them bankrupt these evil companies and let Andrew Torba's new parallel society take the market share.


I think the most egregious thing to come out of corporate America was their adoption of social awareness and all that stuff. This both makes my skin crawl and it fills me with electric rage. And it should. How dare these institutions to take sides on contentious political issues. Worse still, effectively, these companies are trying to become the locus of "morality" in our society.
This!

It is becoming unbearable watching these institutions viciously take on social justice issues. Maybe a dumb question, is working at Wall Street literally like Wolf of Wall Street?
 

DelMarMisty

Woodpecker
Woman
Orthodox
I've always worked in restaurants/kitchens with the exception of being a preschool "teacher" for a few years (and some other short term jobs). Never had much desire to work in an office. Even though you get certain privileges (regular hours, more time off, less things thrown at you) the emotional trade-off seems to be pretty big.
I worked in restaurants a long time ago, I loved it. Real people, food, life! I always wanted to go back, but the office has a way of enslaving you.
 

Kitty Tantrum

Woodpecker
Woman
My only 9-5 was more than a decade ago, pre-kids, and it was actually pretty awesome. I was the "administrative assistant" for a small electrical contracting outfit. Even using the telephone there wasn't so bad, because we got very few calls from the general public. And 90% of the calls from the general public were people who just needed someone to tell them a few times over, forcefully, that YES they DO have a GFI outlet in their garage somewhere, and resetting it WILL fix their problem. But that I'd be more than happy to send an electrician out to charge them $150 to tell them the same thing. :laughter:

One time I had to call an inspector out for "failing" inspection on a permit I hadn't called in for inspection yet. He was in the area inspecting a completely different house at a different address and just decided to pop over and inspect work that was nowhere near finished. This would cost us time and money for a variety of reasons.

He got all mad/petulant (turns out he was the LEAD inspector and thought I was being uppity) but IIRC I made them delete the inspection result from the system entirely because I was totally right and he was out of line for inspecting without a request and it should have been obvious that the wiring wasn't done.

Ugh, people.
 

Starlight

Kingfisher
Woman
I only worked one real 9-5ish job years ago during college and it was retail. I say 9-5*ish* because the manager deliberately gave me *39* hours per week, just one hour under health benefits and all the other goodies that come with full time employment. The retail job was ok. There were times where it was extremely boring at the cash register and you start to wonder if they put the digital clock in the register just to torture you. The worst part was the store ambient music. At first, it’s kind of like, “cool” until you realize that it’s an hour long track that repeats… infinitely. I liked the shop I worked in for the most part and the people working there were pretty chill and had a great sense of humor. Closing was always a crack-up even though we didn’t leave until very late at night. We were all people just doing the gig to get by with our eyes on greener pastures…

I also worked with a mom and pop construction company as a secretary/billing/invoice/payroll/go-for/etc.
This job was probably the worst looking back, mostly because it was a home based business (so I was working in their living room and their family bathroom was the only option which was just weird…) and ***all*** of their records were paper…. nothing was digital and this was in, like, 2005! When I was initially hired, they asked me to balance their books and plopped four 3 inch binders full of printed transactions/receipts/bank statements… The other irritating part was that the wife (my unofficial boss :rolleyes:) would only let me use these pens with thick ink lines (thick like gel pens) for any documents and everything was hand written and… she didn’t like my handwriting because it looked more like chicken scratch than girly bubble letters… she said that she couldn’t read what I wrote… so I told her to learn to read… And that was the end of my employment there.

My favorite work was when my mom was doing a mini-catering service through our church. She would do all kinds of whatever our church needed (funerals, fundraisers, birthdays, etc.) and it was really fun. I was a server for all those projects and really enjoyed it.

*None of this work was “full-time” or “9-5” . My work hours shifted every week and I never was awarded full-time status from a company.
 
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My guess is a lot of it is "agree and amplify." A lot of the huge corporations (the moneyed generational ones) did bad things in the past and are scared of the chnaging landscape, so they go overboard. Gamble of Proctor and Gamble was a big push behind sterilization campaigns in Puerto Rico (which also makes wonder about their products). So now they have tranny commercials to tell you that you, you're the problem.

Also it's probably a "I'm so glad I'm not a Delta" sort of thing. Why complain about your job when you're confronted with so much suffering every day? And the elites have always been weird with similar concerns, I think they probably changed the general social environments to fit their tastes.

I think they just love to be petty tyrants for whatever reason even when people tries to take their work home:

Corporate leadership is also disproportionately staffed by Psychopaths who are very good at getting into power in the first place:

Also Washington DC is very disproportionately psychopathic:


Anywhere there is Wealth and Power. Those types are attracted to it like Bees to Honey.
 

Solitarius

Sparrow
I think they just love to be petty tyrants for whatever reason even when people tries to take their work home:

Corporate leadership is also disproportionately staffed by Psychopaths who are very good at getting into power in the first place:

Also Washington DC is very disproportionately psychopathic:


Anywhere there is Wealth and Power. Those types are attracted to it like Bees to Honey.
Or like flies to ---- ha ha. These piles of rotting pig dung would rather steal or con somebody out of $1 than get $1000 honestly. I think their sadism arises from their knowing in the depths of their stinking putrescent souls that they aren't & never will be men, so the cowardly maggots inflict as much suffering as they can on those they instinctively understand to be their betters as a way to spite God Whom they hate just like their father the devil.
 

Leeloo

Woodpecker
Woman
My guess is a lot of it is "agree and amplify." A lot of the huge corporations (the moneyed generational ones) did bad things in the past and are scared of the chnaging landscape, so they go overboard. Gamble of Proctor and Gamble was a big push behind sterilization campaigns in Puerto Rico (which also makes wonder about their products). So now they have tranny commercials to tell you that you, you're the problem.

Also it's probably a "I'm so glad I'm not a Delta" sort of thing. Why complain about your job when you're confronted with so much suffering every day? And the elites have always been weird with similar concerns, I think they probably changed the general social environments to fit their tastes.
This is such a great insight. I always wondered why these corps would give in to this hogwash when they have plenty of resources and longevity to do as they please. For conglomerates whose god is capitalism, it always seemed so counterproductive for them to suddenly embody these practices that are shooting themselves in the foot, in the name of social virtue signaling. Great point, overcompensation for past indiscretions makes total sense. Never thought of it that way before.
 

Leeloo

Woodpecker
Woman
Appreciate the Bukowski pieces, especially that sentence about the “simple topics of conversation.” It’s amazing and disappointing how often they aren’t joking in these kinds of settings.

I work a “9 to 5” in education, but I am fortunate to be within a support department (not HR fortunately) where I have little to no contact with the public. My immediate team are progressives, but those values don’t come up in the workplace much, so rarely that they probably assume I am one of them. But there’s no place for that and they as people, without bringing social values into a work setting, are a great group to work with. I realize this is quite uncommon nowadays.

Actually, I was recently scouted for a promotional position in the organization with the HR department and turned it down, among other reasons, because I didn’t want to lose my great team and jump into true, paper-pushing “9 to 5 ism” and the pressures to be socially progressive in a blatant way (there was an opening because the previous person refused to get vaccinated or submit to weekly COVID testing).
 

TexasJenn

Woodpecker
Woman
I started doing babysitting jobs at a young age, had a whole slew of service and admin jobs during high school and college, and for the most part have been a professional in my creative/tech area ever since. By now I'm an expert in a high-demand field, have an excellent job, and for years have been regularly recruited for positions paying the same or more. I've worked very hard to get myself to a place where I'm doing meaningful humanitarian, Godly work that I feel great about.

The first thing I want to say after reading your post is that if you're not happy where you are, definitely focus your energy toward a more fulfilling livelihood. I've found there's always PLENTY of work for people who have the basics - good work ethic, grit, reliability, accountability, honesty. It's surprising and kind of amazing how many people don't have even this - probably 75% of people don't. And at this point in time, employers are desperate for good workers, lowering barriers to entry, offering incentives on a level I've never seen in my lifetime... so the opportunities are endless.

I was self-employed for a few years, and while I loved the freedom and I learned a ton... I really appreciate the stability of that regular paycheck and good benefits. The ups and downs of self-employment can be very stressful. I might be self-employed again someday... but if I do, next time I'll do it with a fat bank roll to help me weather the highs and lows.
 

Parmesan

Woodpecker
Middling corporate office work is just a jobs program for lazy, useless imposters. It’s not much different than public sector at this point. 90% of these Outlook jockey roles exist out of fiat, processes born out of processes. Meetings about meetings, etc. Becky expects her reports at 9am sharp! They are just layers of mostly pointless redundancies and easy busy work to obfuscate whatever productivity actually happens (little). Most of these people think meetings, powerpoints, and emails ARE work, and on top of that they think need an “education” to do it. They are viruses to an organization that only replicate through their own incompetence.
 
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