Should young women go to college? If not, what should they (realistically) do?

Should young women go to college?

  • Yes

  • No

  • I don’t know

  • Maybe, under certain conditions (explain)

  • Other (explain)


Results are only viewable after voting.

Elspeth

Sparrow
Woman
Protestant
To provide further context to this figure, this study did not measure the timing of education received or births had, but only the correlation between the level of education and the amount of births had; also, "these rates may not necessarily reflect the total or final educational attainment of the mother," since this was not a longitudinal study (Hamilton, 2021, p. 6). Therefore, it should be noted that there is room for potentially confounding variables that could provide more information about why there is a negative correlation between educational attainment and births had. For instance, some questions that come to mind are whether or not these results are reflective of the fathers of these children? Or perhaps, were these births intentional, rather than accidental/incidental? What was the socioeconomic status of these women? Is there a positive correlation between socioeconomic status and education? (Studies that explore these subjects can be accessed using an open source database like JSTOR, Google Scholar, etc.) Here's a table with more information for those interested (p. 8):

Screen Shot 2022-01-12 at 3.58.18 PM.png
Hamilton, B. E. (2021). Total fertility rates, by maternal educational attainment and race and hispanic origin: United States, 2019. National Vital Statistics Reports, 70(5), 1-8. Accessed January 12, 2022, from https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/nvsr/nvsr70/nvsr70-05-508.pdf.
 

DanielH

Ostrich
Orthodox
To provide further context to this figure, this study did not measure the timing of education received or births had, but only the correlation between the level of education and the amount of births had; also, "these rates may not necessarily reflect the total or final educational attainment of the mother," since this was not a longitudinal study (Hamilton, 2021, p. 6). Therefore, it should be noted that there is room for potentially confounding variables that could provide more information about why there is a negative correlation between educational attainment and births had. For instance, some questions that come to mind are whether or not these results are reflective of the fathers of these children? Or perhaps, were these births intentional, rather than accidental/incidental? What was the socioeconomic status of these women? Is there a positive correlation between socioeconomic status and education? (Studies that explore these subjects can be accessed using an open source database like JSTOR, Google Scholar, etc.) Here's a table with more information for those interested (p. 8):

View attachment 36388
Hamilton, B. E. (2021). Total fertility rates, by maternal educational attainment and race and hispanic origin: United States, 2019. National Vital Statistics Reports, 70(5), 1-8. Accessed January 12, 2022, from https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/nvsr/nvsr70/nvsr70-05-508.pdf.
Pretty sure you're overanalyzing it. When women spend their most fertile years getting "educated" and potentially racking up loads of debt, they're not going to be having, on average, enough children to replace the population, as the data show. There's not a way to square this circle, there is no reforming the situation of having so many women get "educated" in their most fertile years. Idiocracy is unfolding before our eyes and it's only going to get worse until the majority of men acquire the gumption required to tell their daughters and wives that getting that liberal arts degree is a waste of time, and we're not even close to that point.

What is your opinion on the best answer to this question, or what you would suggest to improve or solve the situation?
I'd like to ask this question as well.
 

Elspeth

Sparrow
Woman
Protestant
Pretty sure you're overanalyzing it. When women spend their most fertile years getting "educated" and potentially racking up loads of debt, they're not going to be having, on average, enough children to replace the population, as the data show. There's not a way to square this circle, there is no reforming the situation of having so many women get "educated" in their most fertile years. Idiocracy is unfolding before our eyes and it's only going to get worse until the majority of men acquire the gumption required to tell their daughters and wives that getting that liberal arts degree is a waste of time, and we're not even close to that point.


I'd like to ask this question as well.
Asking questions like these are important for understanding the scope of what a particular study is examining. It's difficult for a single study to accurately explore several issues at once (hence why the power in studies lies not in one, but many on a subject that examine various angles), so by asking questions about the things that the study isn't measuring, more answers may be potentially gathered from other studies, or designing one's own.

Following this thread thus far, there seems to be a lot of opinions here with little that's truly substantial to back them up. You provided a great figure from a pretty solid study (from what I could gather), so I want to thank you for that. Providing these kinds of resources are vital to getting a more accurate understanding about the physical world (in other words, the things that can be measured with the Scientific Method). Because I don't feel like I've read or thought about this subject enough to provide anyone with a singular opinion, I can't just yet. But what I can do is support others' exploration of the topic through the lens of a study, since that's what I do know how to do.
 
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Blade Runner

Ostrich
Orthodox
Asking questions like these are important for understanding the scope of what a particular study is examining. It's difficult for a single study to accurately explore several issues at once (hence why the power in studies lies not in one, but many on a subject that examine various angles), so by asking questions about the things that the study isn't measuring, more answers may be potentially gathered from other studies, or designing one's own.

Following this thread thus far, there seems to be a lot of opinions here with little that's truly substantial to back them up. You provided a great figure from a pretty solid study (from what I could gather), so I want to thank you for that. Providing these kinds of resources are vital to getting a more accurate understanding about the physical world (in other words, the things that can be measured with the Scientific Method). Because I don't feel like I've read or thought about this subject enough to provide anyone with a singular opinion, I can't just yet. But what I can do is support others' exploration of the topic through the lens of a study, since that's what I do know how to do.
That sounded like one of those computer created AI journal articles; I have no idea what I just read.

I ask again, what is your solution or would you suggest to improve the lives of women and men regarding this topic?

Do you think you can square the circle, as Daniel asks?
 

Elspeth

Sparrow
Woman
Protestant
That sounded like one of those computer created AI journal articles; I have no idea what I just read.

I ask again, what is your solution or would you suggest to improve the lives of women and men regarding this topic?

Do you think you can square the circle, as Daniel asks?
I think there's some resources out there that explain how to break down a study. Even though I learned about in school when I had to publish my own, I found a lot of really helpful Youtube videos that certainly made it easier for me. One of the things that irks me about academia is that many researchers are quite pretentious in their use of unnecessary jargon that only further complicate an idea when it really doesn't need to be that way.

As I mentioned in my previous post, I don't really have a concrete opinion yet. It would be silly for me to make up my mind about such a complex issue off of one study or others' personal experiences alone. I'm going to need time to read more and think about it (hence why I was curious what others were reading, like yourself). Honestly, I don't know why you even care to hear my opinion, since I'm just some rando on the Internet. But I'll make a note of it and come back to you on it, if you want.
 

Blade Runner

Ostrich
Orthodox
I think there's some resources out there that explain how to break down a study. Even though I learned about in school when I had to publish my own, I found a lot of really helpful Youtube videos that certainly made it easier for me. One of the things that irks me about academia is that many researchers are quite pretentious in their use of unnecessary jargon that only further complicate an idea when it really doesn't need to be that way.

As I mentioned in my previous post, I don't really have a concrete opinion yet. It would be silly for me to make up my mind about such a complex issue off of one study or others' personal experiences alone. I'm going to need time to read more and think about it (hence why I was curious what others were reading, like yourself). Honestly, I don't know why you even care to hear my opinion, since I'm just some rando on the Internet. But I'll make a note of it and come back to you on it, if you want.
You challenge our ideas and ask questions, so I'm curious as to a) why you object so and b) what your vision of a solution is. You wouldn't be here unless there weren't some problem, so let's hear it, along with a best guess solution.
 

Elspeth

Sparrow
Woman
Protestant
You challenge our ideas and ask questions, so I'm curious as to a) why you object so and b) what your vision of a solution is. You wouldn't be here unless there weren't some problem, so let's hear it, along with a best guess solution.
I think there might be some misunderstanding here. I didn't challenge your ideas, nor Daniel's. I attached extra info contained within the same, valid study that was shared by the latter (hence the parenthetical citations that I included to indicate that was where the information come from). The questions that I ask are similar of any trained researcher, much like a journalist is trained to ask the 5 W's (or 6): Who, What, When, Where, Why, and How. Like I mentioned in a previous post, these are the steps that one may take to identify the perimeters, or limits, of the study, to determine if the study answers a particular question or not (hence why there's a "Limitations" section, on page 5). If it doesn't in its entirety, we would then proceed to consult another study to answer that particular question, or perhaps design a new study that measures that particular thing. Asking questions about a finding is not an objection to it; rather, it's a crucial first step in the problem-solving process.
 
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Blade Runner

Ostrich
Orthodox
Old and ugly women never had it good, and never will.

The question is what to do with women from ages 16-26.

I think women love the serpent idea of having it all, and aren't good at analysis, or particularly honest (the culture is all that matters since that is what estrogen favors in their selection). You want analysis? You ask wise men (or grandmothers who have multiple progeny and aren't emotionally conflicted). Men know what happens when women aren't constrained, they know that invaders kill men and take women, they know that there are no examples of females leading cultures that didn't get wiped out.

Public policy ideas, any of them, that decrease female fertility are bad for everyone, because they also decrease male fertility, by definition, and decrease economic activity, also by definition.

Why are we avoiding this question/reality?
 
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