Showing off my pumpernickel bread

Lamkins

Woodpecker
Woman
Mmmm, I wish we had smell-o-vision!! I mix it then put it in the fridge for a slow 3-day rise. I think that makes the texture so outstanding. It’s soft yet chewy with a nice chewy crust. Recipe below.

Pumpernickel
Makes 2 loaves
Ingredients

  • 1 1/2 cups warm water (105–110 degrees Fahrenheit)
  • 2 1/4 teaspoons active dry yeast
  • 3/4 Tablespoon salt
  • 1 Tablespoon molasses
  • 1/2 cold leftover coffee, decaf or regular
  • 1 Tablespoon unsweetened cocoa powder
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons ground caraway seeds
  • 1 cup rye flour
  • 2 3/4 cups bread flour or all purpose flour

I never proof my yeast. So, basically I dump all the ingredients except the white flour into mixer and mix well. Add white flour a cup at a time. I usually have to add more flour, but it depends on weather. Mix for about 5-10 minutes. Spray a container with oil, cover in plastic wrap or lid, and put in fridge for 2-3 days. Spray bread pans with oil. Remove dough, split in half, and knead for a bit. Set dough into bread pans and sit in warm place till risen. Since it’s cold from fridge this will take awhile. Bake at 350 degrees for about 30 minutes or until knocking top of bread makes a hollow sound.
While I have everything out I put the dry ingredients in a baggie for next time I’m ready to bake bread.67819337-A9CA-4DAF-B059-52698494E230.jpeg
 

Lamkins

Woodpecker
Woman
What purpose does the old coffee serve in the baking process? Just flavor or does it have some kind of effect

I don’t know. It calls for instant grounds or instant espresso grounds, but I never have any. I assume it’s for flavor since pumpernickel has a such a complex flavor.
 

Kitty Tantrum

Woodpecker
Woman
What purpose does the old coffee serve in the baking process? Just flavor or does it have some kind of effect
Flavor and color! And a little aroma, of course.

I made gluten-free pumpernickel for the bakery/cafe where I used to work. We had a really nice espresso machine that I loved to use, so I'd pull shots for the pumpernickel.

FWIW, if anyone is into that, it was a really nice bread to do gluten-free, because it has a lot of "extra" flavors that KIND OF hide the fact that you don't get that wheaty-gluteny goodness in there. I wonder if I still have my recipe.
 

Lamkins

Woodpecker
Woman
Flavor and color! And a little aroma, of course.

I made gluten-free pumpernickel for the bakery/cafe where I used to work. We had a really nice espresso machine that I loved to use, so I'd pull shots for the pumpernickel.

FWIW, if anyone is into that, it was a really nice bread to do gluten-free, because it has a lot of "extra" flavors that KIND OF hide the fact that you don't get that wheaty-gluteny goodness in there. I wonder if I still have my recipe.

You know, I used to be on a diet for crohn’s that prohibited gluten and starches, so I’d make pumpernickel with coconut flour. It was pretty good, and all the extra flavors did work well to hide that it wasn’t regular bread. I’d add cheese a lot of times too, which bumped up the flavor. I think pumpernickel would be a good candidate using nut flour as well.

I just finished cheese toast using some pumpernickel. Mmmmm!!
 
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