Spreadable butter and mayo without seed oils?

frankunderwood

Pigeon
Protestant
After learning about the poisonous nature of seed oils I have been eliminating them from my diet without any issues except for spreadable butter for sandwiches and mayo. Any store bought spreadable butter I have been able to find is cut with canola oil and mayo is also made with canola oil. I have made a couple of batches of home made spreadable butter by cutting butter with olive oil, but I have found that EVOO and refined olive oil both make the spreadable butter taste horrible. So I want to ask the forum for the following:

  1. Recipes for spreadable butter or mayo without seed oils.
  2. Other neutral tasting not toxic non-seed oils that could be used instead of canola oil.
 

Cavalier

Kingfisher
Orthodox
After learning about the poisonous nature of seed oils I have been eliminating them from my diet without any issues except for spreadable butter for sandwiches and mayo. Any store bought spreadable butter I have been able to find is cut with canola oil and mayo is also made with canola oil. I have made a couple of batches of home made spreadable butter by cutting butter with olive oil, but I have found that EVOO and refined olive oil both make the spreadable butter taste horrible. So I want to ask the forum for the following:

  1. Recipes for spreadable butter or mayo without seed oils.
  2. Other neutral tasting not toxic non-seed oils that could be used instead of canola oil.
I buy whipped butter and take it out 1/2 hour or so then it spreads very easy. You can probably find homemade mayonnaise recipes online.
 

Thomas More

Crow
Protestant
I agree the best solution for spreadable butter is to keep regular butter in a butter dish at room temperature.

For mayo, I found this, which uses only avocado oil, with no canola and soy oils like most brands.



Here's a recipe to make homemade mayo with coconut oil

 

doctorweedmd

Robin
Orthodox Catechumen
Use and purchase raw butter. Use clarified butter (ghee) for high temp cooking/frying.

It shouldn't be hard to find a semi-local farm source. Here's a good search source: https://www.realmilk.com/

There are plenty of DIY mayo recipes you can look up online. I don't have any in particular but they are easy to find.
 

Nordwand

Pelican
Other Christian
I really enjoy good quality French butter, and buy it in sticks. Sadly, my apartment is so cold at present that, even when left out overnight, it barely softens. Roll on spring!
 

Zagor

Kingfisher
After learning about the poisonous nature of seed oils I have been eliminating them from my diet without any issues except for spreadable butter for sandwiches and mayo. Any store bought spreadable butter I have been able to find is cut with canola oil and mayo is also made with canola oil. I have made a couple of batches of home made spreadable butter by cutting butter with olive oil, but I have found that EVOO and refined olive oil both make the spreadable butter taste horrible. So I want to ask the forum for the following:

  1. Recipes for spreadable butter or mayo without seed oils.
  2. Other neutral tasting not toxic non-seed oils that could be used instead of canola oil.
What are you spreading your butter on? I don’t see why bread should be more acceptable than vegetable seed oils
 

DanielH

Ostrich
Moderator
Orthodox
What are you spreading your butter on? I don’t see why bread should be more acceptable than vegetable seed oils
If we're talking 24 ingredient "wonder" bread then yes I agree with you. 3 ingredient sourdough, AKA, what we've been eating for thousands of years? No problem with that unless you have extreme problems with gluten.
 

Grow Bag

Pelican
Catholic
The method I use for making mayo is to crack an egg into a jar or measuring jug, add lemon juice, apple cider vinegar and salt (tweak with mustard or whatever), pour olive oil on top, then hand blend (start from the bottom and gradually move up). I never knew it could be that easy until I tried it.
Here's a nice young lady to walk you through it.
 

BasedBaker

Robin
Trad Catholic
The replies telling you to leave butter are on the counter are not wrong, but there is a better way to do that than just in a regular old butter container. This is the tool used in the French Countryside and you can find them at just about any price point and location from ZOG-Mart to Williams-Sonoma depending on your need. I recommend buying the Kerrygold block and putting it in.



Also, a mayonnaise recipe:

 

Zach

Sparrow
Catholic
I will vouch for the Primal Kitchen's Avocado mayo. They even stock it at Costco, its amazing, tastes a little bit tangier than usual mayo but I like that. Plus, no ZOG OIL!

for the butter, AS robin said above, I recommend one of these vs. a butter dish. The butter is kept so much better and tastes fresher, easily spreadable. just add water

 
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Tom Slick

Kingfisher
Orthodox
Can't you just use butter? Butter is very spreadable already.
Part of 20th century mass marketing taught people to habitually refrigerate their food in order to change our conception of what fresh food is, so that we would accept the idea of living in neighborhoods without fresh food markets. One of the consequences of this cultural shift was that people refrigerate their butter, which leaves it too hard to spread when it comes out of the fridge at 35-40° F.
 
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Tom Slick

Kingfisher
Orthodox
How long can you leave butter out in room temperature before it goes bad?
I don't know the answer, and of course this is implicit in your question, but it does depend on the actual air temperature and possible exposure to sunlight. I would say that people just have to try and find out by using their sense of smell and taste to learn the limits under their current conditions.

Before I began to learn about nutrition and quality food sources, I left butter out all day in an air-conditioned apartment that was probably in the mid-70's°F, but I don't know how pure that butter was since I didn't read labels carefully back then. It wasn't margarine, but who knows how much other junk was in there.

For this trial and error I think there is little risk if a person eats just a single knife's worth in order to find out if it's gone bad. I don't think that much butter, about one patty, would do anything bad to a normally healthy person if for some reason they swallowed the whole thing before realizing it was off.
 

inthefade

Kingfisher
Orthodox Inquirer
Part of 20th century mass marketing taught people to habitually refrigerate their food in order to change our conception of what fresh food is, so that we would accept the idea of living in neighborhoods without fresh food markets. One of the consequences of this cultural shift was that people refrigerate their butter, which leaves it too hard to spread when it comes out of the fridge at 35-40° F.
I guess, but if you're having bread and you want butter, wouldn't you put some out? Or toast the bread?
 
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