Spreadable butter and mayo without seed oils?

Barefaced

Sparrow
Other Christian
I always leave a stick of butter out on the counter in a container. Usually doesn’t last long, probably two weeks tops but I’ve never noticed it going bad or been sick from it.
 

Doubting Thomas

Sparrow
Catholic
I always keep my butter in the fridge so I can't say I have any real experience with this personally, but whatever butter's longevity is outside of the fridge, I imagine salted butter will keep better than unsalted butter.
 

Ember

Hummingbird
Other Christian
Gold Member
How long can you leave butter out in room temperature before it goes bad?
I keep a large block of salted butter in a special dish with a lid, and it stays fresh for weeks. Keeping it in the fridge makes it too hard to spread on toast.
 
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tractor

Woodpecker
Orthodox
I wouldn't expose a whole butter block to the room temperature. Cut as much as you need and put the piece on your bread. Wait for 10 minutes. Spread.
 

RedLagoon

Kingfisher
Orthodox Inquirer
Butter at room temperature stays good for weeks, been doing it my whole life, my family has and no one has ever gotten sick from it. It's the normal way to keep it in a mason dish with lid in France, even in summer.

The blonde lady with her mayo recipe seems like the way to go and I'm gonna try it.
 

tractor

Woodpecker
Orthodox
Butter at room temperature stays good for weeks, been doing it my whole life, my family has and no one has ever gotten sick from it. It's the normal way to keep it in a mason dish with lid in France, even in summer.

The blonde lady with her mayo recipe seems like the way to go and I'm gonna try it.

Actually, you're right. People have been eating butter for centuries without keeping it in a fridge :laughter:

The tale of the Red Riding Hood goes: "Go and see how your grandmother is, for I have been told that she is ill. Take her a cake and this little pot of butter."

That's how people stored it.
 

Grow Bag

Pelican
Catholic
Actually, you're right. People have been eating butter for centuries without keeping it in a fridge :laughter:

The tale of the Red Riding Hood goes: "Go and see how your grandmother is, for I have been told that she is ill. Take her a cake and this little pot of butter."

That's how people stored it.
When I used to visit my grandparents cottage in the country as a kid, they had a hole in the ground lined with tin in a shady spot. In it they kept butter and other perishables. One of my aims in this thread is to reintroduce people to the low tech solutions our ancestors used.
 

Hypno

Crow
I agree the best solution for spreadable butter is to keep regular butter in a butter dish at room temperature.

+1

The other thing you can do is reduce your intake of wheat products and to the extent you still need carbs switch to rice or potatoes.

So for example for breakfast instead of toast I'll have a hashbrown. You can buy the McDonalds type hash browns at walmart and stick them in your toaster. I eat mine with salsa instead of margarine or butter.

A rice cooker makes rice prep easy and allows you to replace dinner rolls. You can cook the rice with herbs and some olive oil, or even soup stock, and get flavored rice that doesn't need butter or margarine.

A benefit of all of this is you reduce your wheat intake, which is a good thing to do because today's wheat in the U.S. is GMO and almost as bad as seed oil, plus a lot of people's bodies are sensitive to gluten.
 

The Beast1

Peacock
Orthodox Inquirer
Gold Member
Making your own butter is silly easy. I've done it before.

As for making homemade mayo, that's even easier.
Here's a video from serious eats (best food blog ever) on how to do it.


Just substitute out bad oils for good oils and you'll be good to go.
 

Grow Bag

Pelican
Catholic
Making your own butter is silly easy. I've done it before.

As for making homemade mayo, that's even easier.
Here's a video from serious eats (best food blog ever) on how to do it.


Just substitute out bad oils for good oils and you'll be good to go.

Duplication. I've already posted a video of this method.
 

hkhathaj

Kingfisher
Other Christian
We don't really spread the butter but use it cut to "thin" layers. More butter is always better.

Home made mayonnaise worked with coconut oil for us. We heated the coconut oil so that it just melt. That is at about 30-36 degress Celsius. At that temperature it does not cook the eggs and it mixes with the egg yolks very well. I feared that it will make the mayo hard when it is cooled down but it did not. I think the coconut oil mixes with the fats of the egg yolk and thus it does not freeze any longer at standard refrigerator temperature.
 

typtre

Woodpecker
Non-Christian
1. Get a cheese slicer.
2. Buy a big chunk of butter.
3. Slice.
4. ???
5. Profit.

bestcheeseslicerdem1.jpg
 

Hannibal

Ostrich
Catholic
Gold Member
Use and purchase raw butter. Use clarified butter (ghee) for high temp cooking/frying.

It shouldn't be hard to find a semi-local farm source. Here's a good search source: https://www.realmilk.com/

There are plenty of DIY mayo recipes you can look up online. I don't have any in particular but they are easy to find.
Clarified butter and ghee are two separate things.

Both have similar process in heating up the butter to remove milk solids, but ghee takes it a step further and burns the milk solids into the mix. This raises the smoke point slightly and dramatically changes the flavor.

Clarified butter basically just tastes like butter and is very delicious to most western palettes. Ghee is a nuttier flavor that many do not really care for.
 

GasJuice

Chicken
Catholic
I get the tubs of Kerrygold and just leave them out on the counter. Even in the winter it's easily spreadable, but if not, pop a little bit in the microwave for a few seconds if it's too hard.
 

Diocletian

Woodpecker
Catholic
You can make mayo with olive oil. It will have a stronger flavor than canola.

Do you have a cuisinart or some other food processor? The tube thing with the tiny hole can be used for making mayo.

Put a whole egg plus one egg yolk and a tiny amount of salt in the processor, then turn it on. Insert the tube and fill it with oil, then refill it as needed. The oil will pour through the tube at the correct rate, and you can add a little vinegar or lemon juice for flavor.
 

The Resilient

Ostrich
Orthodox
Making butter at home is the way to go. All you need is a mason jar and some heavy cream.



A baby food jar, heavy whipping cream and a little pink Himalayan salt and 20m of shaking that thing like it owes you money and you're gtg as well
 

CSH2C

Sparrow
Protestant
I agree the best solution for spreadable butter is to keep regular butter in a butter dish at room temperature.

For mayo, I found this, which uses only avocado oil, with no canola and soy oils like most brands.

Yes I have this same mayo in my refrigerator. Avocado oil is a mystery to me. Completely safe or is another ZOG oil?
 

Thomas More

Crow
Protestant
Yes I have this same mayo in my refrigerator. Avocado oil is a mystery to me. Completely safe or is another ZOG oil?

I think the same thing. After all, Avocados, Coconuts, and Olives are all seeds too. Why is their oil ok, but other seed oils are bad?

Iop890 posted about using pomace olive oil for lamps, which led me to look it up. Unlike other classes of olive oil that are made by pressing the olives, pomace is made using solvents to strip the last bit of oil from the leavings of the presses. It doesn't taste the same as regular pressed olive oil. It can be tricky, because sometimes the pomace olive oil will be sold in pretty packaging that makes you think it's the same as other olive oils, if you don't know what pomace means.

What caught my eye was that other seed oils like corn oil or canola oil are always made using solvents to strip the oil from the seeds. Maybe this is the difference. Bad oils are made using an industrial process to separate the oil with solvents, and good oils are made by pressing the source material.
 
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