Stock Market thread

aynrus

Pelican
Yes, Vanguard allows free OTC and penny stock trading, except for certain OTC stocks that are on the "gray list" or something like that. Also, OTC stocks that are not available through the US-based exchanges get a $50 "overseas stock" fee, even though one of the companies I tried to buy, Titan Mining, is a Canadian company. I'd say about half of the OTC stocks, mentioned in this thread, were on Vanguard's banned list.

Otherwise, Vanguard is very easy to use. I buy/trade the stocks within my Roth IRA account so I won't get a capital gains tax when I sell them. Although, at the amounts I'm buying (less than $1000 total), there probably wouldn't be much capital gains taxes unless any of those stocks really shoot through the roof on price.

With Vanguard, you can get exposure to most non-penny small and mid-sized company stocks (like Palantir) through one of their funds or ETFs. Palantir, for example, is part of the portfolio in their mid-cap funds and ETFs, a couple of which I have money in. So, I'm using Vanguard's brokerage for penny stocks because those stocks (some of them) are only included in Vanguard's Total Stock Market Index Fund, which dilutes the advantages you would potentially gain with careful stock picking.
I see. Vanguard Total market fund tracks CRSP US Total Market Index, which requires 15 million market cap min - I guess OTC stocks are included if they meet this requirement. I didn't realize that OTC were included in that fund, thought it was only listed, starting with micro caps.
 

Meraki

Sparrow
Ouch. Absolutely brutal week of selling on XXII, despite good news from the company announcing a hemp/cannabis partnership. Getting a bit impatient, ever since that SPY drop last week, it’s shook this stock down and hasn’t recovered.
 

tothepoint

Woodpecker
I'm 60% cash at the moment. Bag holding 20%, the rest still green and not selling anytime soon.

This is what happens when you buy in an expensive market, you gain 4% on a green day, lose 8% on a red one. I'm really hoping for more serious discounts if this trend continues.

On a more positive note, RKT took off this week. I had a only a small position but this alone allowed me to break-even on two losers today.
 
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Castelnau

Kingfisher
Bought some defense stocks. Feels like with the War on Terror winding down they're going to need some new enemy to get the military to spend more. China being the obvious candidate.

Saw this post on reddit. Also the (FIRST BLACK!!!) Secretary of Defense is a Raytheon guy.

 

typtre

Robin
I'm 60% cash at the moment. Bag holding 20%, the rest still green and not selling anytime soon.

This is what happens when you buy in an expensive market, you gain 4% on a green day, lose 8% on a red one. I'm really hoping for more serious discounts if this trend continues.

On a more positive note, RKT took off this week. I had a only a small position but this alone allowed me to break-even on two losers today.
I wish I was in at least 30% cash but my bags are full and my winners are beaten.
 

tothepoint

Woodpecker
Whenever WSB is launching a squeeze on a stock, please let us know.

Not sure you can predict that but I mentioned RKT a couple times around here in November and I think December.
I will be checking it in the next few days but it's still not too late to get in. If it drops to 24 I would say that's a safe entry.

Another stock that could have a short squeeze in the future is CRSR. Anything mid to low 30s is a safe bet here. Solid company selling computer parts and peripherals that went public last year at $15 if I remember correctly. It quickly exploded to 50 then dropped. At the beginning of Feb when GME took off it went up from something like 38 to 47 then back down in just a few hours.

Lastly, I think NLS is also a good one to buy and hold nowadays. It has been going back and forth from the teens to the twenties for months. Seems to have a bottom at around 17.
 

homersheineken

Kingfisher
Does anyone know of a browser extension that allows you to double-click (or highlight and right-click or whatever interaction) a ticker abbreviation on a page and it gives you the company name? Perhaps even some quick info about the stock (industry) and high level performance?

There is one for Congressman where you hover over the name and it's gives the State, District, % of funding from citizens vs corporations by industry.

It'd be great to have something like that for stocks. I read about them in an article and have no idea what some are and end of having to open a new tab to research.
 
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C-Note

Ostrich
Gold Member
I'm continuing to research rare earth mining to figure out if and how much money I should invest in it. I've learned that environmental concerns aren't the only reasons that very little rare earth ore processing is done outside of China. The other reason is that China, because of its lower labor costs, processes the ore much cheaper than can be done elsewhere. Thus, Chinese rare earths are much cheaper than can be produced outside of China, and this has created a significant barrier to entry for other rare earth mining companies.

Some companies in Australia and elsewhere in South Asia and the Pacific have been processing some ore at a plant in Malaysia, but the output is small and subject to some price pressure, from what I understand. Appia is apparently going to try to process their own rare earth ore in Canada, but the fact that their share price isn't taking off (it's currently $.53) perhaps shows that investors are skeptical that they'll be able to compete with Chinese ore. China seems to be carefully restricting its exports of the minerals to keep the price as high as possible, but they may do like they have with other materials in the past and dump a large amount into the market if someone outside of China, like Appia, tries to compete with them.

Processing rare earths is very expensive, and it produces two toxic byproducts, which are expensive to handle: uranium and thorium. Apparently, there is little commercial demand for thorium. Also, the acids used to process the ore must be carefully handled and disposed of. Evidently, China isn't as concerned about the environmental damage from all of this, which helps keep their processing costs lower. Some companies, like Mkango, may try to build processing plants in Africa where the labor costs are lower, but it's uncertain.

I guess any company which can become a market leader in this industry, such as developing a lower-cost and/or cleaner way to process the ore, will find great success. I suppose it's something to keep an eye on, but I'm not sure I'm seeing anything that would result in big investment returns from investing in Western rare earth mining companies in the immediate future.
 

C-Note

Ostrich
Gold Member
Every single time Powell speaks the stock market takes a dump. He'll be back in 2 weeks...I see a lot of volatility ahead.
Yes, if you bought a bunch of stocks this past week, it's uncomfortable looking at the market returns today, seeing the price of stock you just bought tanking. Looks like I'll be holding most of them for awhile. I did sell the few shares I had bought in TLSS today, at about a $20 loss total, because I think there are better penny stocks I can use that money on. They didn't answer my request for more information from yesterday.
 

typtre

Robin
I'm continuing to research rare earth mining to figure out if and how much money I should invest in it. I've learned that environmental concerns aren't the only reasons that very little rare earth ore processing is done outside of China. The other reason is that China, because of its lower labor costs, processes the ore much cheaper than can be done elsewhere. Thus, Chinese rare earths are much cheaper than can be produced outside of China, and this has created a significant barrier to entry for other rare earth mining companies.

Some companies in Australia and elsewhere in South Asia and the Pacific have been processing some ore at a plant in Malaysia, but the output is small and subject to some price pressure, from what I understand. Appia is apparently going to try to process their own rare earth ore in Canada, but the fact that their share price isn't taking off (it's currently $.53) perhaps shows that investors are skeptical that they'll be able to compete with Chinese ore. China seems to be carefully restricting its exports of the minerals to keep the price as high as possible, but they may do like they have with other materials in the past and dump a large amount into the market if someone outside of China, like Appia, tries to compete with them.

Processing rare earths is very expensive, and it produces two toxic byproducts, which are expensive to handle: uranium and thorium. Apparently, there is little commercial demand for thorium. Also, the acids used to process the ore must be carefully handled and disposed of. Evidently, China isn't as concerned about the environmental damage from all of this, which helps keep their processing costs lower. Some companies, like Mkango, may try to build processing plants in Africa where the labor costs are lower, but it's uncertain.

I guess any company which can become a market leader in this industry, such as developing a lower-cost and/or cleaner way to process the ore, will find great success. I suppose it's something to keep an eye on, but I'm not sure I'm seeing anything that would result in big investment returns from investing in Western rare earth mining companies in the immediate future.

Environmental concerns will take a backseat to demand. Everything in the 'dirty mining' industry is a concern, until it is not. While rare earths, as you mentioned previously, are in fact common, it is rare with deposits that are economically feasible to mine.

The bull thesis as I see it is that China will increasingly need its rare earths for themselves to keep up with their domestic production and to opportunistically wage economic war. The West needs the metals, especially so in defense applications, but also for electric vehicles (which the Elite seem hell bent on forcing upon us at any cost) and other technology. So while China could theoretically compete in low labor and processing costs, if they cannot or will not sell, supply will have to follow demand.

Appia is also exposed to the uranium market which has a parabolic potential on its own. It is still high risk, as with everything in this sector.
 
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tothepoint

Woodpecker
10 year treasury above 1.5% is in a no bueno zone for growth stocks. Inflation expectations are picking up. Tomorrow will be interesting...

It's not good for airlines or cruises either where debt has tripled in the past year. Yet they are on the rise while my cybersecurity and gaming stocks have lost all 2021 gains. Only explanation I have for this nonsense is that the money supply is with the boomers and only a boomer would sell tech stocks right now. Most companies I follow have destroyed earnings forecasts in Q4 2020, another 2 or 3 quarters like that and the fundamentals will quickly catch up. I also don't think we are going back to the old status quo.
 
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Meraki

Sparrow
Yes, that boomer tech sell off is an interesting theory. Market was due for a correction, but ngl was hoping this would come a bit later in March. My plans & portfolio has been getting wrecked the past couple weeks.

A bit shocked, really.

I asked myself, if I wasn’t in any of the stocks I follow right now, and saw the price, what would I think: “it could still trend down since the SPY could test 360 - 370. When that happens, I’d be stoked to buy the dip.”

Many of my speculative plays have done nothing but report good news for the past few months, only to get utterly hammered right now. The market drop is a combo of fear, people taking profit where they have it, EV stuff correcting so more can buy in, and retirees selling FAANG.

Lets face it, nothing is normal right now. Anyone with any faith in the ability of elected leaders to be anything other than willfully incompetent doesn’t have their head on right. Inflation IS happening. But I don’t think it will be anything astronomical - at least not for this year.

People have been out of work, but also have had record savings & fewer expenses. There’s pent up demand in the market (eventually) and I think with Texas and other large states completely opening their workforce, it’s only a matter of time. Regardless of personal economic situations, people WANT to get outside & spend money.

I know it’s difficult, we’re a black-pill prone type. But I think they’ll print and keep the charade going as more states open. By 22 or 23, who knows? We could see a total dollar collapse, more surveillance, more totalitarianism. But it seems the right is finally starting to stand up across the world. One thing about elite super villain plans - they always take forever to unfold. And they are more concerned with the obedience of easy to corral sheep, than outliers.

I’ll be enduring a bit of pain right now, but just to accommodate the sheer amount of cash that’s barely circulating across businesses now, the market will have to come back up. We will see paper gains. And we will see big numbers in the market, as daily goods, entertainment and raw materials prices increase to accommodate clown money.

At least for a year. Will be shocked if they don’t want to give Biden some sort of vaccine grand open victory lap before Lockdown 500, for total psychological torment.

AND - if they crash it, well... unless we make 1%er returns, we‘ll all be equally, equitably broke, owning nothing with KYC ID tracking and vaxxed out of our minds. Ahnd ve vill ve hahppy.
 
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tothepoint

Woodpecker
Yea, stocks taking a dive after earnings seems to be a trend lately.
This comes back to a boomer mentality that recent gains are temporary, as if people will suddenly drop their Netflix subscriptions after buying that expensive big screen TV and rush to the mall instead of online shopping.
Even if everything opens tomorrow people are scared. The media will be talking about this shit for decades. The SARS outbreak in HK brainwashed a large portion of the population into wearing masks permanently.
My job used to require travel to client's office from Monday to Friday. We joked that the plane is 90% people from our team and the expenses were higher than my monthly salary. Since last year everyone is working from home and business is thriving. The company policy has changed and nobody is going back to the old way of working. Meanwhile boomer investors still believe that airlines and commercial RE will return to normal after the exodus from large cities.

Anyway, speaking of CRSR and a potential short squeeze earlier:


Keep an eye on it.
 
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scotian

Peacock
Gold Member
Most of my stocks are taking an ass kicking this week but my Canadian Natural Resources (CNQ) is up nice, 30% since I bought it last October. NCLH up nice too but it's been really volatile this week, I will continue to hold both of these stocks for at least a few more months. I picked up some Canadian uranium (FCU), it's been up and down a lot, gonna hold onto it for awhile.
 

C-Note

Ostrich
Gold Member
Anyway, speaking of CRSR and a potential short squeeze earlier:


Keep an eye on it.
Yes, looks like Corsair might be a candidate for a short squeeze. I just bought three shares @ $31.60 before market close. I know that's chicken feed, but I'm just trying to get a feel for playing squeezes before trying larger amounts in the future.

Anyway, looks like the market is partially rebounding today. I was kind of hoping it would decline for a few days to a week to give me some discounting on some more penny stocks I was hoping to buy in the immediate future.
 
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