Summer Preserving

IconWriter

Woodpecker
Woman
Orthodox
Gold Member
It's too early for anything to come up yet. I like freezing vegetables, green beans and tomatoes, when we get them. This weekend we're watching everything fry and wilt in 90+degree heat!
 

PineTreeFarmer

Woodpecker
Woman
Orthodox Inquirer
It's too early for anything to come up yet. I like freezing vegetables, green beans and tomatoes, when we get them. This weekend we're watching everything fry and wilt in 90+degree heat!
I didn't plant anything because I knew my dogs would just dig it up or the ants would eat it. We are really far South, though, so lots of stuff is already coming in. We go to local farms and get what's in season or go to the Farmer's Market.

I'm running out of English pea and broccoli recipes!
 

IconWriter

Woodpecker
Woman
Orthodox
Gold Member
This summer is our test garden. It's just a small one, but we need to see how much work it is, what critters and weather we have to battle and how to do it. The lettuce is doing well and it's fun to go out at meal times and remove as many leaves as we need. An unknown something took a bite out of a green bean leaf. Local strawberries are so expensive; I'd love to learn how to grow and preserve them.
 

messaggera

Pelican
Woman
Other Christian
Will have to share the herbs we have grown for cooking.

Have a lot of fragrance plants, which I thank the Lord for my sense of smell. These herbal smells create great memories and are also a reminder for how gracious our Lord is to us.

Has anyone cooked with Pepicha? Has overtones of pine, citrus, mint, and anise. It is similar to Cilantro.

The fragrance is amazing and smells great with our lemon Eucalyptus. The flowers are small and delicate, but pretty.


We harvest the annual seeds for blooming plants such as Sweet William, Zinnas, Sunflowers, lily pods, etc.

This year our neighbor inspired me to plant more cut flowers for next year. She also introduced the Zinnia last year. Our front yard has tons of Zinnas in bloom now. She cut some of her flowers from her garden and was kind enough to share with us:

9BEA9760-753E-4FF5-94B5-DA5C94A8E35C.jpeg
 

Luna Novem

Kingfisher
Woman
Catholic
I don't have a big enough garden to can from. I just have a few things growing in pots. But there's a Mennonite family that sells a bunch of produce. I think I'll get some things from them to can, probably in August.
 

PineTreeFarmer

Woodpecker
Woman
Orthodox Inquirer
I don't have a big enough garden to can from. I just have a few things growing in pots. But there's a Mennonite family that sells a bunch of produce. I think I'll get some things from them to can, probably in August.
Tomatoes are coming in here in zone 7a, and then they grow a second crop that comes in in October. Nothing is better than having tomatoes for soup and pasta sauce all winter.

I have spent every summer of my life canning and preserving, except for when I was a teen and in my early 20's and my extremely worldly father encouraged me to work. I used to watch my granny PEEL TOMATOES to can them. Then I figured out blanching and ice baths. Last year one of my girlfriends, who finances her entire household of four on a suburban backyard garden and gifted produce sold online and at farmers markets, showed me to slice tomatoes in half, put them cut side down on a sheet pan, brush with olive oil, and broil them for like, 3 minutes. The skins fall off, and you can pull them off with a fork! Best canning hack ever.

My mom's friends use a ninja foodie and puree the whole tomato, and then process them. I don't like skins in mine, though.
 

Luna Novem

Kingfisher
Woman
Catholic
Tomatoes are coming in here in zone 7a, and then they grow a second crop that comes in in October. Nothing is better than having tomatoes for soup and pasta sauce all winter.

I have spent every summer of my life canning and preserving, except for when I was a teen and in my early 20's and my extremely worldly father encouraged me to work. I used to watch my granny PEEL TOMATOES to can them. Then I figured out blanching and ice baths. Last year one of my girlfriends, who finances her entire household of four on a suburban backyard garden and gifted produce sold online and at farmers markets, showed me to slice tomatoes in half, put them cut side down on a sheet pan, brush with olive oil, and broil them for like, 3 minutes. The skins fall off, and you can pull them off with a fork! Best canning hack ever.

My mom's friends use a ninja foodie and puree the whole tomato, and then process them. I don't like skins in mine, though.
I wish we could meet and you could help teach me! I've done very little so far. I did some blackberry jelly a few years ago, and one time I did some soup. I have a nice canner but have barely used it.

OK so here's a question for you. I got rid of my electric flat stovetop because it never seemed to keep temp and I was worried how that would affect canning. We bought, instead, a regular old coil stovetop, the kind we all grew up with. Electric, but not flat, YKWIM? The kind you'd see in any rental apartment.

Anyway, after purchasing and installing, we realized that it has some stupid new feature where the heat will come down a bit and cycle back up. IDK if it's a safety feature or a "green" feature, but now here I am, brand new stove and STILL scared that the temp irregularities will affect canning! Advice?
 

PineTreeFarmer

Woodpecker
Woman
Orthodox Inquirer
I wish we could meet and you could help teach me! I've done very little so far. I did some blackberry jelly a few years ago, and one time I did some soup. I have a nice canner but have barely used it.

OK so here's a question for you. I got rid of my electric flat stovetop because it never seemed to keep temp and I was worried how that would affect canning. We bought, instead, a regular old coil stovetop, the kind we all grew up with. Electric, but not flat, YKWIM? The kind you'd see in any rental apartment.

Anyway, after purchasing and installing, we realized that it has some stupid new feature where the heat will come down a bit and cycle back up. IDK if it's a safety feature or a "green" feature, but now here I am, brand new stove and STILL scared that the temp irregularities will affect canning! Advice?
I don't use a pressure canner. I put everything in a hot water bath and process it for about an hour. Sometimes I use a giant roasting pan and a boiling water bath and just put the jars in the oven, but EVERYTHING HAS TO BE HOT WHEN YOU START PROCESSING IT.
When I have questions I look at the instructions on the UGA website for canning and preserving. And then I do it a little longer!!
But the biggest thing is making sure everything is clean and hot when you get started. They also make a tool for getting lids out of the hot water bath that's magnetic and it's so, so much easier than trying to fish them out of a big pot of boiling water with tongs.
Something else that exists in most communities is a university extension processing space. When crops come in here, if we so desire, we can go use a UGA extension office industrial canner and processing space for a nominal fee per quart. We also have a local canning company called Crider Foods that allows us to send large crops to them and put our own labels on them. When my cousin Laurel had her first baby I put up Jesus Laurel Baby Pears that way. :)
 

Luna Novem

Kingfisher
Woman
Catholic
I don't use a pressure canner. I put everything in a hot water bath and process it for about an hour. Sometimes I use a giant roasting pan and a boiling water bath and just put the jars in the oven, but EVERYTHING HAS TO BE HOT WHEN YOU START PROCESSING IT.
When I have questions I look at the instructions on the UGA website for canning and preserving. And then I do it a little longer!!
But the biggest thing is making sure everything is clean and hot when you get started. They also make a tool for getting lids out of the hot water bath that's magnetic and it's so, so much easier than trying to fish them out of a big pot of boiling water with tongs.
Something else that exists in most communities is a university extension processing space. When crops come in here, if we so desire, we can go use a UGA extension office industrial canner and processing space for a nominal fee per quart. We also have a local canning company called Crider Foods that allows us to send large crops to them and put our own labels on them. When my cousin Laurel had her first baby I put up Jesus Laurel Baby Pears that way. :)
Yes, I do have the little magnetic tool. Somewhere, lol.
 

PineTreeFarmer

Woodpecker
Woman
Orthodox Inquirer
Yes, I do have the little magnetic tool. Somewhere, lol.
When my kids get ready to cook anything I always ask them, "do you have your mise?" French kitchen term, mise in place, things in place. Just make sure you're ready before you get started and everything is clean.
I don't think the stove makes a bit of difference.
 

Starlight

Kingfisher
Woman
Protestant
I’ve never canned anything in my life but I’m going to try doing a strawberry refrigerator/freezer jam to get a feel for it. My mom cans stuff all the time like no big deal. I’ll stop by for a visit and she’ll have just canned like 30 jars of tomatoes lol.
 

PineTreeFarmer

Woodpecker
Woman
Orthodox Inquirer
I’ve never canned anything in my life but I’m going to try doing a strawberry refrigerator/freezer jam to get a feel for it. My mom cans stuff all the time like no big deal. I’ll stop by for a visit and she’ll have just canned like 30 jars of tomatoes lol.
Fridge strawberry preserves are amazing, too! I make four ounces jars pretty regularly with the leftover fruit in my fridge. Small batch ones you can eat in a short period of time.
 

Starlight

Kingfisher
Woman
Protestant
Fridge strawberry preserves are amazing, too! I make four ounces jars pretty regularly with the leftover fruit in my fridge. Small batch ones you can eat in a short period of time.
I’m going to the fruit stand tomorrow. I’ve read that very ripe summer strawberries make the best jam. I’ll let you know how it goes!
 

PineTreeFarmer

Woodpecker
Woman
Orthodox Inquirer
If rhubarb didn’t look like red celery, I think I’d like it more lol
When I was a kid there was a country radio morning show host called Rhubarb Jones in Atlanta, and even today I equate rhubarb with something sweet, probably diabetic, and lol country. I have never tasted it, though, and have no idea how it tastes?
 

Starlight

Kingfisher
Woman
Protestant
When I was a kid there was a country radio morning show host called Rhubarb Jones in Atlanta, and even today I equate rhubarb with something sweet, probably diabetic, and lol country. I have never tasted it, though, and have no idea how it tastes?
It’s gross (imo). Sour, bitter, tart… but not in a good way… Not sure who the genius was that decided to cook it with an unhealthy amount of sugar to make it a “dessert.” I’d say that it’s nearly inedible raw. (This was rhubarb from very north Michigan).
 

PineTreeFarmer

Woodpecker
Woman
Orthodox Inquirer
It’s gross (imo). Sour, bitter, tart… but not in a good way… Not sure who the genius was that decided to cook it with an unhealthy amount of sugar to make it a “dessert.” I’d say that it’s nearly inedible raw. (This was rhubarb from very north Michigan).
I looked it up, and I have absolutely no idea what I would do with it. Like, if it tasted like lemon, but bitter sounds icky.
 
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