Supply chain disruptions thread

fireshark

Woodpecker
Orthodox Inquirer
Walmart has resorted to using robot trucks. The whole supply chain disruption is an excuse to further automate industries where a large uproar of opposition would have occurred before.

Precisely. There's a whole host of new start-ups developing automated vehicles of all kinds, for all kinds of uses. As well as other automated, AI-driven tools and processes. 2022 you will see many new brands and services come onto the market pushing this stuff with happy music and commercials, the underlying reality being the swift replacement of millions of human jobs with machines all because of a super convenient pandemic.
 

Garuda

Pelican
That Ribeye must be an eight pack or something.

https://www.costco.com/usda-choice-beef-ribeye-steak,-12-oz,-4-count.product.100763025.html

Precisely. There's a whole host of new start-ups developing automated vehicles of all kinds, for all kinds of uses. As well as other automated, AI-driven tools and processes. 2022 you will see many new brands and services come onto the market pushing this stuff with happy music and commercials, the underlying reality being the swift replacement of millions of human jobs with machines all because of a super convenient pandemic.
You were right about the swiftness of the movement.

 

Max Roscoe

Pelican
Orthodox Inquirer
Don't forget in reading stats like the above 29,000 robots... It's not like in the human realm where 29,000 hirings or firings is a temporary thing, as many people change jobs, and people are only in the workforce for about 40 years and are then replaced by younger workers.

29,000 robots represent well over 29,000 jobs PERMANENTLY removed from the workforce (as robots are more efficient and can work 24/7 without breaks and never getting sick, and often work faster than humans). So if there are 100 million jobs in America, just think of the cumulative effects over decades of PERMANENTLY taking say, half a percent of all jobs away every year for decades...

In fact, it's normal for there to be around ~300,000 unemployment claims in the US every week. But these are of a temporary nature, and the benefits expire, and eventually basically all of these 300,000 people find new employment (or retire). In other words, there are eventually 300,000 new jobs these people find. But buy 30,000 robots, and those jobs are PERMANENTLY gone from the labor pool. And if these robots are in your industry, you may find it almost impossible to find work in your field of expertise.
 

Foolsgo1d

Peacock
Then random idiots come out with things like "these workers should be trained to repair the robots" - as if it is something simple and non-technical.

What to do with all the left over workers? A combination of UBI, worse health security, worse standards of living and less people.

A rather brilliant spiders-web of a plan really if you were a lunatic with too much power.
 

grenade001

Woodpecker
29,000 robots represent well over 29,000 jobs PERMANENTLY removed from the workforce (as robots are more efficient and can work 24/7 without breaks and never getting sick, and often work faster than humans). So if there are 100 million jobs in America, just think of the cumulative effects over decades of PERMANENTLY taking say, half a percent of all jobs away every year for decades...

Machines require regular maintenance and upkeep. The upfront cost for a robot is multiples higher than that from a regular worker. The cost would have to be absorbed over a number of years before the break even point is reached - usually about 5 to 10 years. It is the main reason why developing countries still have people doing menial tasks that in the developed countries were replaced by or greatly assisted with machines.

SAP spend millions developing integrated HR/Payroll systems for mid-large businesses under various brand names. A lot of the work that would have been done by a person in Payroll, and another in HR, a team manager can now do directly via the program. It has increased productivity, but not to the stage where there is a mass displacement. Furthermore, the SAP system my company uses is down for at least one day in the month due to some sort of bug, or scheduled maintenance.

If machines have the reliability of self-serve checkouts, then I doubt that the extent of the displacement will be so dire. With the aging population and the reduction in working aged people, even accounting for mass immigration, a drop of 0.5% a year in the number of jobs available is manageable.
 

Easy_C

Peacock
SAP spend millions developing integrated HR/Payroll systems for mid-large businesses under various brand names. A lot of the work that would have been done by a person in Payroll, and another in HR, a team manager can now do directly via the program. It has increased productivity, but not to the stage where there is a mass displacement. Furthermore, the SAP system my company uses is down for at least one day in the month due to some sort of bug, or scheduled maintenance

That and it’s a system which is deliberately made ultra-complex because then you need to pay SAP $600/hr (Yes. Actual number from a live project) for a Platinum consultant to un-screw up what your Big4 Consultants did because even they can’t figure out how to make this massively complex software, with minimal usable user documentation to perform basic functions.
 

hedonist

Kingfisher
As I suspected and surmised...as we're nearly to Thanksgiving the shortages appear to have been fake news.

Anything you heard of was likely a combination of wonky supply chains and businesses wanting to pull forward the holidays. What this means, since warehouses are totally full right now, we'll see a glut of goods next month as demand falls off, as it normally would after the holidays.
 

Viktor Zeegelaar

Ostrich
Orthodox Inquirer
Walmart has resorted to using robot trucks. The whole supply chain disruption is an excuse to further automate industries where a large uproar of opposition would have occurred before.

After I've read Klaus' book the Great reset, I realize how much of a trojan horse technology really is. This really is the trojan horse issuing in total control, total dependence, total takeover of all aspects of life and humanity.
 

rainy

Kingfisher
One of the services my company offers is planting annual flowers. There's a few windows throughout the year to do it. Around mother's day for summer annuals, labor day for fall annuals, then Nov for cold season annuals like cabbage/kale.

Our suppliers are already saying there will such shortages next year that our orders for next year's summer/fall annuals must be in no later than Dec 3rd, as in next week, or we're out of luck.

Normally we would order in April/May.
 
I live in a Tijuana suburb, yup, that's right ;-)...........and I can vouch to a large extent for Jim Stone, at least regarding his reports on Mexican grocery stores and supply chain issues. i.e. there are none. Every store I go in is well stocked. Prices do not seem to be going up for food. In my opinion this supply chain stuff is of course bogus and is directed at twisting the arm of recalcitrant US citizens.

The only place prices have gone up is in WalMart, especially on meats. But anyone who lives in Mexico and buys meat at WalMart is an idiot. Their meats are shit. There are so many other, better options. There are stores that do nothing BUT sell meat. Su Carne, El Florido, etc. Even Calimax, the most bog-standard proletarian Mexican grocery store - with average quality meats - and I'd buy there before Wal Mart. Personally I go to El Florido. Good quality, good prices.

There are options to shopping at chain grocery stores, since there are still a lot of Mom & Pop type places. But there's really no need to avoid them. Doesn't seem to be much corporate looting going on related to Covid or supposed supply chain issues at the chain stores, I mean beyond what they already do "normally". If you get what I mean.

Also, it's super easy to buy Ivermectin here.

As an expat gringo there's a lot of things I dislike about Mexico but the food or supply chain issues isn't one of them.
 
The supply chain stuff is one part of the Covid scam I’m not versed in. My mom loves parroting the cnn thing “Covid has caused supply chain issues .”

Can i get a cliffs of what is really causing this , if there is a real shortage ? Is it money printing and entitlements and vaccine mandates causing labor shortages that wrecks the supply chain or is it deliberate sabotage (what is the end goal?)
 

Viktor Zeegelaar

Ostrich
Orthodox Inquirer
The Amish figured that one out long long time ago and now they reap the rewards.
I saw a video about the Amish today and something really touched my heart. During corona when people became very ill they'd stay at home as they couldn't have visitors in the hospital, signifying that having loved ones around them was more important than the length of their lives themselves. Full acceptance of all that is. Contrast that with the facemask normies, overweight, steeped in Netflix and immorality, cowering back in fear for a flu virus and in exention everything to safe their lives, which are flying by in the blink of an eye anyway.
 
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