Supply chain disruptions thread

Easy_C

Peacock
The supply chain stuff is one part of the Covid scam I’m not versed in. My mom loves parroting the cnn thing “Covid has caused supply chain issues .”

Can i get a cliffs of what is really causing this , if there is a real shortage ? Is it money printing and entitlements and vaccine mandates causing labor shortages that wrecks the supply chain or is it deliberate sabotage (what is the end goal?)

Say "no, Covid RESPONSE has caused supply chain issues".
 

Ozzymandius

Sparrow
Non-Christian
Machines require regular maintenance and upkeep. The upfront cost for a robot is multiples higher than that from a regular worker. The cost would have to be absorbed over a number of years before the break even point is reached - usually about 5 to 10 years. It is the main reason why developing countries still have people doing menial tasks that in the developed countries were replaced by or greatly assisted with machines.

SAP spend millions developing integrated HR/Payroll systems for mid-large businesses under various brand names. A lot of the work that would have been done by a person in Payroll, and another in HR, a team manager can now do directly via the program. It has increased productivity, but not to the stage where there is a mass displacement. Furthermore, the SAP system my company uses is down for at least one day in the month due to some sort of bug, or scheduled maintenance.

If machines have the reliability of self-serve checkouts, then I doubt that the extent of the displacement will be so dire. With the aging population and the reduction in working aged people, even accounting for mass immigration, a drop of 0.5% a year in the number of jobs available is manageable.

What you wrote above would be logical if we lived in a true free market economy.

But we don't.

We live in a central banking economy where a complex of financial-political-corporate entities can monopolize entire sectors, shut down competitors at will (e.g. Covid) and subsidize whatever industries they want while allowing others to die.

I was just watching a Max Igan video the other day where he highlighted an Australian restaurant chain that RENTED serving robots at only $50 each per day to replace their wait staff - much more cost effective than human employees.

How is the robot leasing company turning a profit?

How is the robot manufacturing company turning a profit?

Maybe they aren't. And maybe that does not even matter.

Amazon did not turn a profit for what, 20 years or more? And even the profit they have today would not be possible without all those years of favorable tax status implemented by congress and all their competitors shut down by the plandemic.

Profit and normal economics do not matter for elite-favored industries!

If they want to replace 70% of the work force by 2030 with robots, you can bet your bottom dollar that they will do exactly that.
 

Padouk

Kingfisher
Non-Christian
What you wrote above would be logical if we lived in a true free market economy.

But we don't.

We live in a central banking economy where a complex of financial-political-corporate entities can monopolize entire sectors, shut down competitors at will (e.g. Covid) and subsidize whatever industries they want while allowing others to die.

I was just watching a Max Igan video the other day where he highlighted an Australian restaurant chain that RENTED serving robots at only $50 each per day to replace their wait staff - much more cost effective than human employees.

How is the robot leasing company turning a profit?

How is the robot manufacturing company turning a profit?

Maybe they aren't. And maybe that does not even matter.

Amazon did not turn a profit for what, 20 years or more? And even the profit they have today would not be possible without all those years of favorable tax status implemented by congress and all their competitors shut down by the plandemic.

Profit and normal economics do not matter for elite-favored industries!

If they want to replace 70% of the work force by 2030 with robots, you can bet your bottom dollar that they will do exactly that.

As evident but the way pharmaceutical companies are treated by governments and the EU for example.

 

Ozzymandius

Sparrow
Non-Christian
Welp, just experienced my first sighting of supply chain disruptions in my northern Californian town.

We have a Trader Joe's, a Safeway, a few other chain stores and a number of local farmer's market type stores.

Whenever I go to Trader Joe's or Safeway, the shelves are always 95%+ stocked up, as I tend to visit early on Mondays, just after restocking.

This week Trader Joe's was completely out of bread and many other basic items! I've been shopping at TJ's all across California in the last 25 years and I have never seen anything like that. Safeway shelves were also down from 95%+ to about 70% - very significant drop. Store employees were profusely apologizing for the lack of items.

I don't think that the supply chain will drop down in a steep linear fashion. Most likely to decrease in spurts. Then rebound. Then drop again. But ultimately declining to bread line levels in the major cities in just a few short years.

In smaller towns like where I live, I expect that the farmer's market style independent stores will likely still have stuff, as they tend to source from nearby farms and non-national chains. At least I hope so.
 

Elipe

Pelican
Protestant
On the topic of robotics, what proportion of the worker base has the intellectual capability to repair them? How will this jive with the drive for diversity in the workplace?

After all, IT has a disproportionate amount of certain racial underdogs in it right now. And fixing robots won't be like fixing printer jams.
 

William Faulkner

Sparrow
Orthodox
I'm currently trapped in same state and I too have been seeing shortages at the grocery stores as well. Prices have gone through the roof. Shopping at a normal grocery store is like going to a Whole Foods pre Covaids. Really feels like this is the front lines out here. The people here are all jabbed, muzzled, and following the narrative. I'm not sure what they've done to the minds of people out here but it is a different level of obedience and submission than anything that I have seen in any other state. I call them pod people or covidians. It's invasion of the body snatchers weird out here. Food shortages are happening here.
 

DanielH

Ostrich
Orthodox
On the topic of robotics, what proportion of the worker base has the intellectual capability to repair them? How will this jive with the drive for diversity in the workplace?

After all, IT has a disproportionate amount of certain racial underdogs in it right now. And fixing robots won't be like fixing printer jams.
They'll have to make these things modular. Actual repairs will be a thing of the past; it's going to be plug and replace. Unclamp the leg unit, disconnect the coupling cable, reconnect the coupling cable to the new leg, clamp in place. Refurbishments to be done off site if at all.

In my field of diesel engineering, we're losing the ability to repair things by taking engines apart to the grief of the older mechanics and specialists which is leading to a more modular design of engines and more computerization to operate these engines. We can't rely on operators to understand the signs of a failing engine, such as sound/vibration, exhaust color, metal dust in the filters, lube oil or coolant temperatures, etc. anymore - that is all outsourced to computers. Zoomers are getting hired as mechanics who have never used a ratchet and they have to be babysat almost constantly. I'm hearing of diesel manufacturers planning to make VR headsets (or software for them) which will recognize engine parts and label them in real time and sync it with the repair manual so these people will be able to do repairs. Basically they want to turn maintenance into a video game for zoomers (not trying to bash zoomers but that's the reality of the situation.)
 

Padouk

Kingfisher
Non-Christian
They'll have to make these things modular. Actual repairs will be a thing of the past; it's going to be plug and replace. Unclamp the leg unit, disconnect the coupling cable, reconnect the coupling cable to the new leg, clamp in place. Refurbishments to be done off site if at all.

In my field of diesel engineering, we're losing the ability to repair things by taking engines apart to the grief of the older mechanics and specialists which is leading to a more modular design of engines and more computerization to operate these engines. We can't rely on operators to understand the signs of a failing engine, such as sound/vibration, exhaust color, metal dust in the filters, lube oil or coolant temperatures, etc. anymore - that is all outsourced to computers. Zoomers are getting hired as mechanics who have never used a ratchet and they have to be babysat almost constantly. I'm hearing of diesel manufacturers planning to make VR headsets (or software for them) which will recognize engine parts and label them in real time and sync it with the repair manual so these people will be able to do repairs. Basically they want to turn maintenance into a video game for zoomers (not trying to bash zoomers but that's the reality of the situation.)

That's really interesting insights you provide there. I love diesel engines and I'm sad to see them being replaced.

The trouble with this new ultra-tech utopia is that they always seem to forget that complex system experiences higher levels of entropy and nobody escapes the Murphy's Law: “Anything that can go wrong, will go wrong.
 

r3d

Woodpecker
Protestant
A popular alt media podcast claims to have documents from insiders in high places. The next move in Germany is apparently to create a shock-and-awe psy-op about food shortages. So the media going into a frenzy about how there is not enough food, creating panic and fear. Obviously then everyone stockpiles and empty shelves become a self-fullfilling prophecy to the point where the government needs to ration food.

Then that will be used to further discriminate against unvaccinated people who will be blamed for it all.

I'm torn about this one. Part of me doesn't want to believe it, but when I ask myself why they wouldn't do it, I can't come up with anything either.
People fell hook line and sinker for a killer virus that doesn't kill people. Seeing how there are _actually_ some problems with supply chains now people would gobble up this story.
 

Padouk

Kingfisher
Non-Christian
A popular alt media podcast claims to have documents from insiders in high places. The next move in Germany is apparently to create a shock-and-awe psy-op about food shortages. So the media going into a frenzy about how there is not enough food, creating panic and fear. Obviously then everyone stockpiles and empty shelves become a self-fullfilling prophecy to the point where the government needs to ration food.

Then that will be used to further discriminate against unvaccinated people who will be blamed for it all.

I'm torn about this one. Part of me doesn't want to believe it, but when I ask myself why they wouldn't do it, I can't come up with anything either.
People fell hook line and sinker for a killer virus that doesn't kill people. Seeing how there are _actually_ some problems with supply chains now people would gobble up this story.

Remember, it's BREAD and circuses (the internet and social media). So no, there will be no food shortages, nor blackouts.
 

Easy_C

Peacock
In my field of diesel engineering, we're losing the ability to repair things by taking engines apart to the grief of the older mechanics and specialists which is leading to a more modular design of engines and more computerization to operate these engines. We can't rely on operators to understand the signs of a failing engine, such as sound/vibration, exhaust color, metal dust in the filters, lube oil or coolant temperatures, etc. anymore - that is all outsourced to computers. Zoomers are getting hired as mechanics who have never used a ratchet and they have to be babysat almost constantly. I'm hearing of diesel manufacturers planning to make VR headsets (or software for them) which will recognize engine parts and label them in real time and sync it with the repair manual so these people will be able to do repairs. Basically they want to turn maintenance into a video game for zoomers (not trying to bash zoomers but that's the reality of the situation.)
And people think the idea of "lost tech" from Warhammer is stupid. As dumb as I think that setting is (and I think it is VERY dumb) I have to admit that reality is starting to resemble it in some ways.
 

Helmsman

Sparrow
Protestant
And people think the idea of "lost tech" from Warhammer is stupid. As dumb as I think that setting is (and I think it is VERY dumb) I have to admit that reality is starting to resemble it in some ways.

Roman concrete was used extensively, and after the collapse of the empire it became impossible to get the components together in quantity. Supposedly there were records of the general mix design but I’m not sure of that. It fell by the wayside and forgotten until the early 19th century, and did not gain traction for decades. If there is a true interegnum many technologies we take for granted will be lost for centuries due to friction (declining IQ, war, unrest) and logistical problems in acquiring the needed materials.

I used to read a lot of science fiction and one of my favorite authors was Jerry Pournelle. He put together a series of three anthologies about the stages of empires, granted set in the far future. And one of the motifs in the anthology of collapse stories was supply chain disruption as a part of a receding empire.
 

EndlessGravity

Pelican
Protestant
I hope you're right. I'm really starting to make progress on my bench-press and squat.

I don't wanna go to war over some cottage-cheese to keep my strength gains.

Stock up on peanut butter!

Them: "Aren't you worried about the coming collapse?"

Me: "Naw, I'm gonna flex and chill."

You know you're a nutty prepper when you're angry food shortages and world-wide starvation might disrupt your lifting session.
 

Easy_C

Peacock
If you have the cash to burn, buy a freeze drier. One of the guys in my homesteader/prepper group did that. It will take up a lot of power but it allows you to preserve food that will last for almost a decade if sealed after.

Ideally you would produce as much as possible yourself but the freeze drier allows you to stock up produce and other goods which do not grow in your area.
 

C-Note

Hummingbird
Other Christian
Gold Member
In smaller towns like where I live, I expect that the farmer's market style independent stores will likely still have stuff, as they tend to source from nearby farms and non-national chains. At least I hope so.
And right on cue the socialists begin to condemn farmers markets and local producers as "white supremacy."

 

Steven jr

Chicken
Orthodox
I live in the greater Phoenix area, a freemason founded social experiment (just my opinion). They seem to be trying to shuttle people from failing states like CA into this soon to be mega city. I hadn't noticed any shortages that others had discussed and wondered if they were trying to shield this area from these problems in order to make this place more appealing. I finally noticed some shortages in the last few weeks, I drink organic grass fed milk and I noticed that those were missing on the shelves. The regular glyphosate enriched milk was in full supply it was just the good stuff that was out. Also I work at a high end grocery store and we haven't been able to get our whole chickens for our rotisserie in the last week. Do you guys think that certain areas are high priority while others are more or less abandoned?
 

budoslavic

Eagle
Orthodox
Gold Member


Truckers in U.S., Canada Warn Supply Chain Crisis To Get Worse Over Vax Mandate​

Truckers’ alliances in both the United States and Canada are warning that a supply chain that is already encumbered with serious problems is about to get a lot worse amid vaccine mandates in both countries.

“The main trucking lobbies in Canada and the United States are warning that vaccine and testing requirements for workers will further disrupt supply chains because there is already a dire shortage of drivers,” Newsmax Finance reported Friday.

The outlet adds:
Canada will require vaccines for truck drivers starting in January, while the Biden administration has issued rules requiring truck drivers at companies with 100 or more employees to be vaccinated or submit to weekly testing.

More than two-thirds of goods traded between Canada and the United States travels on roads and highways. For most of the pandemic, truckers crossed the border regularly as they were considered essential workers to keep supply chains flowing.


Interestingly, while vaccines were still in development last year, truck drivers were considered essential workers — and heroes who were honored by then-President Donald Trump — as they continued to deliver goods and products to American consumers despite uncertainties over COVID-19.

Now, however, they, like equally heroic healthcare workers during the pandemic, are being forced out of their jobs, in essence, because they oppose a vaccine for a virus that has a minuscule death rate.

“We know that there already is disruption in the supply chain; this is going to intensify it,” said Stephen Laskowski, president and chief executive of the Canadian Trucking Alliance (CTA), which represents roughly 4,500 transporters.

Estimates by the associations indicate that between 10-20 percent (12,000-22,000) Canadian truckers and around 40 percent (16,000) U.S. truck drivers who travel into Canada will be sidelined if the vaccine requirements take effect.

The Canadian requirement seems on pace to go into effect, but federal courts in the United States have blocked President Biden’s vaccine mandate for companies with 100 or more employees, though White House officials have continued to urge businesses to implement the requirement anyway.

“This is not a trucking issue. This is a Canada-U.S. economic issue,” Laskowski told Reuters, noting further that around 70 percent of C$650 billion ($507 billion) in U.S.-Canada trade moves by truck.

Newsmax adds:
The American Trucking Associations (ATA), together with others, is seeking to block U.S. President Joe Biden’s vaccine mandate in court.

Supply chain problems caused by the pandemic has contributed to inflation in both countries rising to decades-high levels.


“Given the nature of our industry and makeup of our workforce, (it) could have devastating impacts on the supply chain and the economy,” noted ATA President and CEO Chris Spear in a statement.

In written remarks sent to the Labor Department, the ATA said the nation’s transportation companies could lose up to 37% of their drivers to “retirements, attrition to smaller carriers and/or conversion to independent contractor owner-operators.”

That is substantial, the ATA said, because truck drivers carry about 70 percent of all U.S. freight tonnage.

“We’ll be seeing shortages of goods in stores” if the vaccine requirement deadline is not delayed, said Perrin Beatty, president of the Canadian Chamber of Commerce.

The news about reduced trucking capacity comes amid other bad economic data reported in the U.S. on Friday.

“The Labor Department said in its monthly payroll report released Friday that payrolls in November rose by just 210,000, well below the 550,000 jobs forecast by Refinitiv economists,” Fox Business reported.

“It marked the worst month for job creation so far this year. The unemployment rate (which is calculated based on a separate survey) dropped more than expected to 4.2% from 4.6% — the lowest level since the pandemic began,” the outlet continued.

“Today’s employment report is doubly disappointing because the reference week occurred just as it looked like COVID was on the retreat,” Justin Wolfers, a University of Michigan economist, told Fox Business. “This was a moment for people to return to malls and to return to work. The COVID-related news has only gotten worse since then.”
 
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