Survival in post-coronavirus world (prepping, supplies, protection, money)

aynrus

Pelican
I got 8 cans of refried beans left in my car (the rest got eaten in Idaho woods).
Seriously, there's too much good food in the US, stores are about to explode from all imaginable and unimaginable food supplies. Been eating all kinds of fresh organic food once I reached towns, there's too much to chose from, extreme food options exuberance.
Once I eat these 8 cans not going to store anything anymore, finishing up dried food supplies I got for the warm season trip and will travel on with little supplies. A little fasting never hurts but the only real danger in America is gaining weight.
 

presidentcarter

Ostrich
Gold Member
I got 8 cans of refried beans left in my car (the rest got eaten in Idaho woods).
Seriously, there's too much good food in the US, stores are about to explode from all imaginable and unimaginable food supplies. Been eating all kinds of fresh organic food once I reached towns, there's too much to chose from, extreme food options exuberance.
Once I eat these 8 cans not going to store anything anymore, finishing up dried food supplies I got for the warm season trip and will travel on with little supplies. A little fasting never hurts but the only real danger in America is gaining weight.
I don't know man.

I think it's always wise to 'plan for the worst, hope for the best' and to always do your best to be prepared - although I'm not a 'prepper' per se I do wish I could prep more but cannot in my current situation.

Anecdotal: my s.o. was in one of the largest grocery stores in a city of millions not long ago.

Poultry almost 100% out. Other meats almost out as well. Only meats that had any decent stock was processed sausages and the like. Middle of the day on a week day and almost fully out of meats for no apparent reason.

Just wait until there's a 'reason'.

VTVjP4v.png
 
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aynrus

Pelican
I don't know man.

I think it's always wise to 'plan for the worst, hope for the best' and to always do your best to be prepared - although I'm not a 'prepper' per se I do wish I could prep more but cannot in my current situation.

Anecdotal: my s.o. was in one of the largest grocery stores in a city of millions not long ago.

Poultry almost 100% out. Other meats almost out as well. Only meats that had any decent stock was processed sausages and the like. Middle of the day on a week day and almost fully out of meats for no apparent reason.

Just wait until there's a 'reason'.

VTVjP4v.png

I don't know where you find that kind of stuff....I went through half the country again over the last 2.5 months, remote and rural regions but even there it's extreme food options exuberance. And I'm really picky about what I eat. Anyway, I don't care about all that fear-mongering, living generations of Americans don't even know what lack of food is because they've been very privileged to have this special upbringing among total exuberance. Some temporary shortage of 1 out of 10K items is a food shortage in America. I don't really eat meat anymore but just yesterday as it was my resupply day had seen overwhelming meat options including organic. Raw, smoked, ground, sausage, kielbasa, bacon, links, steak, filet mignon, breast, legs, wings, sliced, whole, salami, bologna, prosciutto and zillion of everything else. If 95% of this disappears there'll be still too many options.
 
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presidentcarter

Ostrich
Gold Member
I don't know where you find that kind of stuff...
I'll tell you where...one of the largest cities in America. And she took the picture herself (your wording implied that I'd grabbed the image online somewhere or that the store must have been located on the dark side of the moon).

Not fear mongering. As I stated I'm not what you'd call a 'prepper' at all but to assume there will always be an abundance of food especially in overly-dense urban areas in perpetuity is just foolish imo. And you've considered a status quo supply - what if someone 'interferes' with the supply chain, etc on a regional or community level. Is that another impossibility?

The gap year backpacker or mountain woodsman with no family or home base may not need to worry about keeping anything extra on hand - everyone else needs at least some level of contingency planning.

My family were very rural farmers and all were canners, had deep freezers full of meats, etc. They were about as 'self sufficient' as one can get and they still stockpiled as best they could. Growing up in the depression had an influence but so did seasonal droughts, bug problems, etc. You just never know. And they weren't naive to think 'oh this is modern America, that'll never happen'.
 

aynrus

Pelican
I'll tell you where...one of the largest cities in America. And she took the picture herself (your wording implied that I'd grabbed the image online somewhere or that the store must have been located on the dark side of the moon).

Not fear mongering. As I stated I'm not what you'd call a 'prepper' at all but to assume there will always be an abundance of food especially in overly-dense urban areas in perpetuity is just foolish imo. And you've considered a status quo supply - what if someone 'interferes' with the supply chain, etc on a regional or community level. Is that another impossibility?

The gap year backpacker or mountain woodsman with no family or home base may not need to worry about keeping anything extra on hand - everyone else needs at least level of contingency planning.

My family were very rural farmers and all were canners, had deep freezers full of meats, etc. They were about as 'self sufficient' as one can get and they still stockpiled as best they could. Growing up in the depression had an influence but so did seasonal droughts, bug problems, etc. You just never know. And they weren't naive to think 'oh this is modern America, that'll never happen'.
Well, largest cities are really just ghettos and one can always find something bad there, including shootings, so out of all innumerable grocery stores in big cities one can probably find 1 empty spot, not really surprising. Something probably had been put on clearance sale and sold out.
It's like saying there've been a shooting in Chicago, so it's not safe to leave the house as if shootings are all over America.
I prefer not to worry about things not worth worrying about. I said a few things in this thread about real food shortages I had seen. Americans can relax and enjoy the summer. There'll be endless supply of chicken legs ahead and about everything else, 20 varieties of every single imaginable food item out there.
It's obscene how many kinds of meat and everything else is sitting on the shelves (who's going to eat all that? much is getting spoiled), gazillion of varieties of hot sauce, several brands of turkey, beef and chicken in every store, and multiple versions of about everything else to chose from (albeit often with chemicals unless it's fresh or organic food). Too bad real healthy meats such as goat and lamb are lacking. The real problem is chemicals/additives/pesticides in foods, but it's a different story.
 
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Well, largest cities are really just ghettos and one can always find something bad there, including shootings, so out of all innumerable grocery stores in big cities one can probably find 1 empty spot, not really surprising. Something probably had been put on clearance sale and sold out.
It's like saying there've been a shooting in Chicago, so it's not safe to leave the house as if shootings are all over America.
I prefer not to worry about things not worth worrying about. I said a few things in this thread about real food shortages I had seen. Americans can relax and enjoy the summer. There'll be endless supply of chicken legs ahead and about everything else, 20 varieties of every single imaginable food item out there.
It's obscene how many kinds of meat and everything else is sitting on the shelves (who's going to eat all that? much is getting spoiled), gazillion of varieties of hot sauce, several brands of turkey, beef and chicken in every store, and multiple versions of about everything else to chose from (albeit often with chemicals unless it's fresh or organic food). Too bad real healthy meats such as goat and lamb are lacking. The real problem is chemicals/additives/pesticides in foods, but it's a different story.

The normalcy bias in action, folks.
 

aynrus

Pelican
In the meanwhile, at next week resupply I will face agonizing choice between buying wild boar, Elk or bison meat (all the meat talk made me want to eat it again), among impending shortages, gloom and doom and disappearing lowly chicken legs full of hormones and antibiotics.
Then, I will face truly horrible choice between at least 40 varieties of hot sauce to go with it.
The sad chore will continue as a long walk through football-field sized supermarket full of all kinds of foods, to the produce isle, where at any time of the year freshest produce is falling off the full shelves as if it was eternal summer and harvest time.
Then, a trip to a warehouse-sized liquor store where I only want certain kind of German liquor and nothing else will do, even though there 100s of items to chose from.
 
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I think it is a good idea to at least keep a 1-2 month supply of dried goods and canned goods. You can mark dates on them and use them by the FIFO method (first in-first out) always replenishing the stock. This is exactly what supermarkets will do as well. Ex. try to maintain a stock of 5-6 cans of green beans, after you use 1-2 cans, buy 1-2 more to get back to 5-6 cans. Keep a list of a proper amount of supplies and each week, do a quick inventory or just have a shopping list and when you use a can of food, put it on the list and get it when convenient.

1-2 months is good for issues like natural disasters or when you are very sick and can't leave your home. Usually, things will get settled in less than this time period but having more food doesn't hurt. It also doesn't take up that much space to store such an amount of food. Make sure the dried goods are stored well to avoid insects getting in them. I would suggest hard plastic containers. Once, a went on vacation and cockroaches were able to get into my sealed bag of noodles. I used to think sealed bags were enough to keep out bugs and I was proven wrong. Keep water jugs as well. I would advise rotating containers every week. You don't want to let water sit too long.

Keep an extra can opener as well and have a portable camp stove with some fuel. You want to be able to cook food in case electricity is down.
 

EvanWilson

Kingfisher
Gold Member
The normalcy bias in action, folks.
The abundance in the grocery stores is only 'in effect' as long as the supply chain is up and running and long term, an illusion. If anything goes wrong with the supply chain, most stores would start having shortages within a few days, and probably be completely out of stock of all needed items within a week. Stores are setup and run to turn over the entire inventory every week; they are part of the distribution chain, not a warehouse designed to store weeks/months worth of food for the surrounding area.
 

EvanWilson

Kingfisher
Gold Member
I think it is a good idea to at least keep a 1-2 month supply of dried goods and canned goods. You can mark dates on them and use them by the FIFO method (first in-first out) always replenishing the stock. This is exactly what supermarkets will do as well. Ex. try to maintain a stock of 5-6 cans of green beans, after you use 1-2 cans, buy 1-2 more to get back to 5-6 cans. Keep a list of a proper amount of supplies and each week, do a quick inventory or just have a shopping list and when you use a can of food, put it on the list and get it when convenient.

1-2 months is good for issues like natural disasters or when you are very sick and can't leave your home. Usually, things will get settled in less than this time period but having more food doesn't hurt. It also doesn't take up that much space to store such an amount of food. Make sure the dried goods are stored well to avoid insects getting in them. I would suggest hard plastic containers. Once, a went on vacation and cockroaches were able to get into my sealed bag of noodles. I used to think sealed bags were enough to keep out bugs and I was proven wrong. Keep water jugs as well. I would advise rotating containers every week. You don't want to let water sit too long.

Keep an extra can opener as well and have a portable camp stove with some fuel. You want to be able to cook food in case electricity is down.
One thing that is never discussed or mentioned; having some supplies around, even if never used, is the difference between being a 'participant or observer' in a crisis. Dave Ramsey mentioned this in relation to a financial crisis. If one has a few months, or several months, of savings, and something goes wrong with one's income then one is not in a panic and part of any financial crisis that is going on. BUT if one has no savings and they lose their job, now they are part of, or a participant, in the next financial crisis that comes along. (and they come along every 5 to 10 years like clockwork!)
 

mr_mike_

Chicken
RE: Survival in post-coronavirus world (prepping / supplies / protection / money)

Youtube channel called "Canadian Prepper." I've been watching this guy for a little while and I like his comprehensive approach to prepping, but also his videos where he goes more into the psychology and mental health issues of a post-shtf type situation.

his old stuff was good...his material became way too gear-focused when he set up his store. and his newest titles just sound way too clickbaity

with prepping gear things sit on a spectrum of consumables(food/fuel/soap,ammo) <-> durables(tools,guns,shelters)

Too many preppers hoard durables, think knife/gun collections. While neglecting things that get consumed, or that wear out.

Too many also think one-dimensionally (ex mil. guys focusing on security while neglecting the rest).
 

aynrus

Pelican
Claim your place in Ghost Town before it is too late.

Can't watch videos due to low bandwidth now... From comments it seems like it's SoCal.
I've been seeing a lot of new type of real estate listings where they sell parcels of hardly usable desert land in SoCal, with some shed plopped on it, the whole thing waterless, priced like houses and advertised as some kind of covid getaways.. .absolutely ridiculous. If there's brush on the land, by the way, it all can burn in fast-moving brush fire with occupants not having a chance to leave, these fires don't mess around.
People can run Airbnb off these type of setups for weekend getaways from Los Angeles in a dry cabin, about the only real use of such parcels.
Reminded me of infamous Alamosa/San Luis Valley land scam.

My idea of good land is it having easily accessible water, good soil, low risk of natural hazards plus, hopefully, a longish growing season.
 
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aynrus

Pelican
The abundance in the grocery stores is only 'in effect' as long as the supply chain is up and running and long term, an illusion. If anything goes wrong with the supply chain, most stores would start having shortages within a few days, and probably be completely out of stock of all needed items within a week. Stores are setup and run to turn over the entire inventory every week; they are part of the distribution chain, not a warehouse designed to store weeks/months worth of food for the surrounding area.
Everything in about everyone's life depends on function of supply chains, fuel, including heating, food, water, medicines, about everything - chains that are setup to provide certain short duration supply only, this is normal. I don't see a point in paranoid thinking with unnecessary worry about disruption of these chains. One might get old worrying about that stuff that never comes.

In the meanwhile, as I promised above, I had a choice between elk, bison, a bunch of other meats and about a zillion of foods and drinks in extreme abundance.
 

Foolsgo1d

Peacock
Is the curfew really that bad?

it was but its been 24/hour except sundays for a number of months now.

Autumn and winter coming will change it again I reckon. The ground has been set and these supply chain issues are something I am very interested in.

And lets not forget the vaxx pass or you're not getting in.
 

Easy_C

Peacock
I get feeling like there’s a ton of food options.


HOWEVER....those fully stocked shelves are entirely dependent on a complex supply chain having zero failures that last more than 24 hours.

If the trucks stop showing up for as little as 48 hours or so all of those “food options” will be completely gone and there will be at best scraps left.

And it’s not a “paranoid worry”. In the place I was living last year shelves got stripped bare. Literally the entire inventory, of every grocery store in my town, was stripped completely bare between panic buying and shut downs upstream in the business. There was about a week where you couldn’t get anything and then when you could go back it involved standing in line for an hour plus with very limited inventory available.

Not to mention non “paranoid” events. Things like flooding, tornadoes, ice storms, bridge collapses, etc. can very easily shut down all those logistics for a LOT longer than it will take for store inventory to deplete, and this happens somewhere in the country every year.
 

The Resilient

Ostrich
Orthodox
I don't know man.

I think it's always wise to 'plan for the worst, hope for the best' and to always do your best to be prepared - although I'm not a 'prepper' per se I do wish I could prep more but cannot in my current situation.

Anecdotal: my s.o. was in one of the largest grocery stores in a city of millions not long ago.

Poultry almost 100% out. Other meats almost out as well. Only meats that had any decent stock was processed sausages and the like. Middle of the day on a week day and almost fully out of meats for no apparent reason.

Just wait until there's a 'reason'.

VTVjP4v.png
As a trucker, I see more than just metropolitan areas. There's poultry everywhere (albeit costs of it are getting stupidly high) outside of these areas. Get out of these sh**holes...
This is such a limited scope
 

Wode

Chicken
For the guys that want to keep using phones and computers, I recommend switching to a degoogled android and to linux :
- Pixel 4a : $300 -> install grapheneos (or at least use the Pixel OS which is miles better than the competition)
- Dell XPS : $1000-$1500 -> install any linux distribution that you like, this computer is good for linux support. If you have more money you can take something like a Lenovo P1 or X1 Extreme. These are Linux-certified laptops (unlike the dell XPS, but in practice it is almost as good because its professional carbon-copy, the Dell Precision 5500, is linux-certified)

I'm saying that because the globalists might start to force you to install health apps on their OS once the covid pass is adopted by western countries.
-> Apple already forces you to keep a health app on the iphone (and to use their shitty iCloud, Siri and tons of other monstruosities). They will most likely merge Macos and iOS in the next 5-10 years (Macbooks now have ARM processors).
-> Windows... Well you know Bill, he kinda likes vaccines and covid passes it's his dream for many years so no need to tell you to avoid Windows
 

Tippy

Robin
I would like a phone that is basically a Nokia 3210 but also with GPS..is there anything like that? Maybe a custom made type thing ?
 
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