Testing for antibodies

puckerman

Ostrich
Has anyone had a coronavirus antibody test? I don't mean a test for having the virus. I mean a test for antibodies, which means that you had it sometime in the past. What was your experience?

I bought one home-test kit from Fast Medical. It had a device to stick me to get some blood. The sticker didn't work out of the box. I contacted them, and they were no help.

Any Lab Test Now also has a test. I have thought about taking this one.
 

slowpoke

Sparrow
Yeah I had one at the end of May but tested negative. I had been really sick the first week of Jan and thought it might of been covid.

Though I guess there is a chance I left it too long as it was almost 5 full months. Also I let the place convince me that taking the rapid test was fine instead of the one they send to the lab. I'm sure the rapid one won't be as accurate even though they told me it was. Probably because they make more money from the rapid test.

So if I was going to do it again I would get the test sooner (say 2-3 months after recovery) and get the lab test.
 

Edin

Robin
I guess you want to test for anti-bodies to see if you're protected but the whole idea of anti-bodies/viruses is not what the fraudulent virology teaches.

Viruses are solvent produced by the cells to deal with dead and toxic matter. Antibodies (white blood cells) are the ones that bring matter to the viruses. Both agents work together as a unit. Since viruses are not alive, they must have a guiding agent, thus, antibodies are utilized - viruses cannot fly or walk, and have no survival mechanisms. Antibodies are always used as facilitators of healing, which is a part of the infection process.

Viruses break down and disassemble matter into minuscule simple particle structures that are more easily dealt with by the bodily system, allowing the body to neutralize them by binding with neutralizing minerals, such as calcium and magnesium.

But if you need the test for a travel pass, I'll just say, the more we play by their rules the more impossible they will become.
 

hkhathaj

Woodpecker
In some countries you can get an immunisation card if you test positive for anti-bodies. That is the plus side.

On the con side:

* You may not test positive and then it was a waste of your resources. If you want to travel with family (my case) you need big luck to all have a positive antibody test.
* You pay for the companies that take their part in perpetuating the hoax. I would feel bad about this issue even though they will not go bankrupt without my money.
* There is a chance that your DNA sample will get into a database that they can use for other goals (but this could be possible in a regular blood work as well.). Maybe it is impossible to avoid it on the long run.
* You get less rights than the vaxxed. (In Hungary you can not visit certain institutions with a positive anti-body test. I know people who can not visit their parents in Hospitals but they could visit if they had the vax.)
* The immunisation card is only valid for 3-4 months AFAIK

My original decision was not to take any part in the hoax and do not do test of any kind willfully. When it comes to my own holiday I am also on the fence if I could take a test that is less intrusive than the nose swab tests.
 

Cuchulainn2016

Woodpecker
I guess you want to test for anti-bodies to see if you're protected but the whole idea of anti-bodies/viruses is not what the fraudulent virology teaches.

Viruses are solvent produced by the cells to deal with dead and toxic matter. Antibodies (white blood cells) are the ones that bring matter to the viruses. Both agents work together as a unit. Since viruses are not alive, they must have a guiding agent, thus, antibodies are utilized - viruses cannot fly or walk, and have no survival mechanisms. Antibodies are always used as facilitators of healing, which is a part of the infection process.

Viruses break down and disassemble matter into minuscule simple particle structures that are more easily dealt with by the bodily system, allowing the body to neutralize them by binding with neutralizing minerals, such as calcium and magnesium.

But if you need the test for a travel pass, I'll just say, the more we play by their rules the more impossible they will become.
Stop pushing your pseudo-science witch-doctory mumbo jumbo. If you know better, start your own thread and give evidence of what you are saying.

Anyway, if you want an antibody test, look for one of the new T-cell tests, they show antibodies a lot longer.

Most of the "restrictions" against unvaccinated people I have seen, have in small print, "or a positive antibody test"
 

Papaya

Peacock
Gold Member
“Anti-bodies” are short term reactive defense This is part of the misinformation campaign that will perpetuate the “ vaccine” agenda. Theyre pushing the idea that because “ anti bodies” recede relativelyshortly that therefore even if youve had Wu Flu you need a vaccine to be protected

Redonkulous bunk!

T cells and even more importantly B cells are “memory“ cells that are actually indicative of “ immunity “ T cells and B cells can and usually do last for years


 

AntoniusofEfa

Kingfisher
“Anti-bodies” are short term reactive defense This is part of the misinformation campaign that will perpetuate the “ vaccine” agenda. Theyre pushing the idea that because “ anti bodies” recede relativelyshortly that therefore even if youve had Wu Flu you need a vaccine to be protected

Redonkulous bunk!

T cells and even more importantly B cells are “memory“ cells that are actually indicative of “ immunity “ T cells and B cells can and usually do last for years


And decades against some diseases.
 

Papaya

Peacock
Gold Member
To elaborate on my earlier post:

"Antibodies dont last" is pro vaxx misdirection and disinformation rhetoric.



If you got Wu Flu and survived (like 99.97% do) theres no reason to get a jab...none

Note: This is directly from NIH's (under the auspices of Dr Fauxci )own web site !
 
Last edited:

Dijkstra

Chicken
I have had both a test for active infection and, very recently, antibodies as a result of worries over potential exposure. Both negative. The antibody test was part of a routine bloodwork appointment, so there was nothing unique about it, just an additional few words from my doctor's office when they called me to give the lab results.
 

FrMark

Chicken
Orthodox
Priest
Has anyone had a coronavirus antibody test? I don't mean a test for having the virus. I mean a test for antibodies, which means that you had it sometime in the past. What was your experience?

I bought one home-test kit from Fast Medical. It had a device to stick me to get some blood. The sticker didn't work out of the box. I contacted them, and they were no help.

Any Lab Test Now also has a test. I have thought about taking this one.
Yes. My wife had an antibody test done by a local lab for $50. She tested positive for antibodies but can’t point to a time where she ever experienced COVID.
 

Eusebius Erasmus

Kingfisher
Orthodox
Yeah I had one at the end of May but tested negative. I had been really sick the first week of Jan and thought it might of been covid.

Though I guess there is a chance I left it too long as it was almost 5 full months. Also I let the place convince me that taking the rapid test was fine instead of the one they send to the lab. I'm sure the rapid one won't be as accurate even though they told me it was. Probably because they make more money from the rapid test.

So if I was going to do it again I would get the test sooner (say 2-3 months after recovery) and get the lab test.

Be careful about this.

The media has clearly deceived many into believing that antibodies are the only form of immunity.

However, T-cell immunity is a more robust and longer-lasting form of immunity, and cannot be spotted in antibody tests. Most people who've had Covid-19 have cell-mediated immunity.


"Antibodies dont last" is pro vaxx misdirection and disinformation rhetoric.

Technically, antibodies don't last -- cell mediated immunity lasts, and this is very hard to detect unless you go through extensive lab testing.
 

C-Note

Ostrich
Gold Member
Around October last year (2020) I felt weak for about two weeks and had a slight fever one day. So, when I went in for my annual physical in December I asked for a COVID antibody test since they were going to take my blood anyway to check for cholesterol. It came back positive for antibodies. I'm glad that happened, because I'll be using that as the basis for asking for medical exemptions from the jab in the future.
 
Top