Texas devastated by extreme cold spell

Roosh

Cardinal
Orthodox
This has been going on for a few days now. Over 30 people have died and millions are without power.
Related to this, gas prices will rise and also food. The entire country will be impacted.
 

Mountaineer

Ostrich
Gold Member
I'm surprised that Texas has snow. When was the last time this happened?

Everything aside I think this crisis is engineered to a degree. It wouldn't surprise me if this wave of cold was synthetic. We have no idea what kind of technology these devils posses.
Chemtrails have nothing to do with this. Ah hem.
That's not what I'm talking about.
 
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Thomas More

Hummingbird
I'm surprised that Texas has snow. When was the last time this happened?
North Texas gets at least some ice or snow often enough. I took a picture once of the Texas state border sign covered in ice. It's less common the farther south you go, but freak cold snaps are not unheard of.

This does seem to be a real black swan though, with an extra deep arctic air mass going way far south, and then seemingly getting stuck for days.

Some say that Texas' electrical shortages are due to over reliance on wind and solar, but my understanding is that natural gas is also affected, since the cold shuts down gas drilling sites. Also, even some of the gas and coal generating stations have been knocked out by the cold in one way or another. They're taking hits from every direction.

It's really a perfect storm.
 
The situation in Texas is ridiculous and to be honest, I blame it on incompetence, ignorance, greed and lack of Godly leaders. We had a severe storm back when the superbowl was in Arlington, great sheets of ice all over, frozen in. We still had power and water. I have power but have been without water for the whole week. Those who have water are being told to boil it before use but they have no power to do so. We who have power have no water. The overlords, those who hold office or positions responsible are playing ping pong with the blame game, that doesn't fix things.

The snow was great, very beautiful and powdery, haven't seen snow like this in a million years. Walked to the park and took some pictures of the river and stuff. A lot of red breasted robins about. The woodpeckers are working overtime, redbirds as always. The buzzards, well they like to perch on the light poles above the road in wet, dreary weather. The animal world goes on as we "intelligent" humans scramble around in a daze, "Wanting Answers." This reminds me, that big wreck that was over a mile and a half long with 100 plus vehicles, the states "leaders" were quoted as saying they want answers. Easy, people. Sunday when I went to the store the roads were becoming slick with ice. People were speeding, fishtailing and driving like idiots. One guy in a BMW went speeding past me and slid into the curb going downhill at the stop sign. He had to pull over as his tire was busted, probably other stuff broken too.

The Satanists just posted a big billboard stating how abortion saves lives, go figure. Some mayor somewhere posted something about people are on their own and do not deserve or even should expect aid from their "elected" leaders. He resigned but this is not an isolated thought. You would think that Texas would be different but... Just remember, we have a lot of people moving here from California and a bunch of Yankee's too.
 

PaulC

Robin
I've been following a guy on YouTube who was driving from California back to Florida when this all hit. He almost ran out of gas because no service stations had power to the pumps or gas. The places with gas couldn't take credit cards, so travelers could only purchase what they could afford with the cash they had on hand. No coffee for sale at gas stations because they have no water to make it. No toilets available either.

The hotels he stayed at also had no water because of burst pipes, so no shower, no toilet. Seeing ice and snow at the U.S./Mexico border was strange. Constant 18-wheeler crashes and highways shutdown. Hopefully it will be a wakeup call for the need for carrying cash and keeping basic supplies stocked up.
 

estraudi

Pelican
Gold Member
I never knew that people actually equated Texas with constant tropical weather.
Texas gets every type of weather. Extreme heat and cold, extreme downpours and droughts, extreme winds and stillness, extreme snow and zero precipitation, extreme tornados and hurricanes.
Nothing is or ever will be off the table when it comes to Texas weather. They get everything. I lived there for nearly 20 years and saw it all.

The kicker is that we actually paid damn good attention to the weather and its patterning as it blows in off of the Rockies, sweeps in from the mexican monsoons or swirls in from the Gulf. Once you pattern the weather and prepare for worse than what the weather retard is predicting we actually were unfazed by any weather. We worked with the weather and not against it.
For those who are Texans(or anybody really) and have the means: Always have a full size and fully stocked pantry, extra 5 gallon water jugs(or rainwater tanks if you have your own well), boiling pots, blankets(woven or mylar), chopped wood, rice, beans, canned veggies, nut mixes, a goat for milk, tire chains, tow straps, propane and torches and you should be fine without civilizational amenities. It would be non-Texan to not be prepared for any scenario!
 

FrancisK

Kingfisher
Gold Member
I was in Houston over the last weekend people were losing their minds over it being 40 degrees in the daytime, being from Michigan I found it kinda comical that. People at the supermarket were acting like the apocalypse was starting, it was the beginning of covid all over again....really silly. I was also in Dallas for the stupid bowl way back when and it snowed, the cab drivers were afraid to drive anywhere it was a total mess they shut the city down the weekend they were hosting the stupid bowl. At one point I offered to drive the cab and the guy actually took me up on it my friends and I still laugh about that!

But when the blackouts starting happening this week that's when it became an actual issue instead of dumb people just being dumb and the media fear mongering. But even before that places were voluntarily shutting down even before it snowed and even before it went below freezing, again very silly.....god forbid you have to put on a coat.

It really is a ridiculous situation that in 2020 in a well off state such as Texas that everything would shut down and have to do rolling blackouts just because it's below freezing for a few days. I understand they don't have the infrastructure to deal with snow which was on the ground for all of one night but you're telling me they don't have the infrastructure to deal with increased demand for electricity? Can anyone explain to me how that is different from when it is 110 degrees and everyone has the AC on full blast?
 

PillBoxer

Sparrow
I'm in the middle of in Austin. It's not a lack of godly leadership. It's a unique blend of bad weather, lack of resources, and demand.

People are blaming each other because there is nothing that can be done right this instant until the weather changes. Grids and states are never going to adequately prepare for a conditions that have a 80% of not happening. Go and look at any policy book from two years ago on pandemic preparedness, and you'll find a paragraph tops.

What I can say is that there is little federal relief on the ground here. FEMA was given authorization four days ago and it never showed up.

There are people here with no water, limited food, and with power out for 4-5+ days in below freezing temps. You can't escape because the roads are unsafe, and even if you wanted to, there's a run on gas. The grocery stores are barren.

If you want a comparison, go take a hurricane and run it over Florida for a week. That's Texas right now.
 

estraudi

Pelican
Gold Member
I was in Houston over the last weekend people were losing their minds over it being 40 degrees in the daytime, being from Michigan I found it kinda comical that. People at the supermarket were acting like the apocalypse was starting, it was the beginning of covid all over again....really silly. I was also in Dallas for the stupid bowl way back when and it snowed, the cab drivers were afraid to drive anywhere it was a total mess they shut the city down the weekend they were hosting the stupid bowl. At one point I offered to drive the cab and the guy actually took me up on it my friends and I still laugh about that!

But when the blackouts starting happening this week that's when it became an actual issue instead of dumb people just being dumb and the media fear mongering. But even before that places were voluntarily shutting down even before it snowed and even before it went below freezing, again very silly.....god forbid you have to put on a coat.

It really is a ridiculous situation that in 2020 in a well off state such as Texas that everything would shut down and have to do rolling blackouts just because it's below freezing for a few days. I understand they don't have the infrastructure to deal with snow which was on the ground for all of one night but you're telling me they don't have the infrastructure to deal with increased demand for electricity? Can anyone explain to me how that is different from when it is 110 degrees and everyone has the AC on full blast?
The ironic part is I have lived in the desert of AZ for many years now and I hear the same stupid argument too.
"Let's manage our energy consumption so that we don't overload our grid!"
Meaning that the power companies are profiting off of insane rates but at the same time barely even upgrading their lines and plants to handle a heavier demand.
That, to me, falls under the infrastructure problem facing this country for decades.
If we're doing our civil duty rightly our elected officials should be hearing complaints left & right about the sorry state of our whole country.
The trick is to get them to collect less taxes so that we can build our infrastructure better than that ponzi scheme called "infrastructure bill" being passed through congress first.
Write your congressman, men!
 

Hell_Is_Like_Newark

Kingfisher
Gold Member
I work in an energy related business...

I was talking with someone connected to ERCOT about two month's back, right after Texas experienced an ice storm. I was told the grid got very near rolling blackouts because wind (nominally about 25% of the power generated on the grid) went to zero and so did output from solar PV. Gas fired generators were able to come online, at great expense, to make up the deficit.

Brief overview of power generators:
  • A 'simple cycle' (think jet engine attached to a generator) natural gas fired generator can be brought online in minutes.
  • The more efficient combined cycle plants (exhaust from the jet turbine used to make steam which then power steam turbines). may take a day or so to ramp up.
  • Large coal and nuclear plants can take days to get to full output and can only adjust their output by about 1% every hour. They also have limited 'turn-down' capability due to the development of harmonics. So they have a limited output range before the plant has to be turned off. The issues of harmonics is exasperated by adding more and more wind power to the grid.

During this debacle, wind power output due to ice conditions dropped over 90%. Solar PV was 100% gone. The issue wasn't natural gas fired plant capacity, it was the ability to get them fuel. Natural gas cannot be stored in any great amount at the plant. A coal plant can have 90 days worth of coal outside and a nuke plant can go up to three years between refuels. Gas has to be pulled out of underground storage and sent by pipeline to the generators.

The demand for gas outstripped the ability to supply: Residential requirements skyrocketed, equipment to move the gas froze up, and some pipeline compressor stations shutdown due to the power failure. This created a cascade of failures that took more generation capacity offline, which was aggravated further by a pump failure at one of the two nuke plants took one reactor offline.

Last I checked on ERCOT, wind, and solar was back up to about 10% of the supply; operating at less than 20% of its nameplate rated capacity.

Weather dependent, non-dispatched energy sources that are asynchronous (wind & solar) are poison to the power grid. The upper limit is about 10% (Texas was running in the 25% range) before costs skyrocket and grid stability goes to hell. The variability of wind & solar prevent scheduling power plants (load following plants) to pre-ramp up to respond to weather and just general demand changes over the day. These plants, many of them coal, have been decommissioned in part as a result (over 6 Gigawatts of coal power gone) of the adding of wind and solar to the grid.

Texas is coming to your state as the whole damn country it seems is going full retard in trying to add renewable power to the grid.
 

Canopy

Chicken
Orthodox
*Tin foil hat on*

Could this be punishment or payback for voting for Trump, 2020 election lawsuits, or general Corona virus pushback?

I haven't seen that angle anywhere and I don't know enough about who controls power generation/distribution in Texas. This thought came to me as soon as I saw this mess unfolding. Nothing would surprise me at this stage.
 

911

Peacock
Gold Member
I'm surprised that Texas has snow. When was the last time this happened?

Everything aside I think this crisis is engineered to a degree. It wouldn't surprise me if this wave of cold was synthetic. We have no idea what kind of technology these devils posses.

That's not what I'm talking about.

You can make it rain by seeding clouds, make hurricanes more powerful, make clear skies cloudy/hazy, but you can't create a massive arctic cold wave, or a big heat wave, this is mother nature's work.

Deep freezes in the SE happened a lot more regularly back in the 1970s-80s, you're probably too young to remember it. Deep frosts in FL which wiped out citrus crops (see below). The climate has been milder in the SE in recent decades, both milder winters and cooler summers. The major FL deep freezes are listed below, but I think the last minor FL freeze was in the 2000s, which wiped out the lemon crop.


Timeline of Major Florida Freezes

1977

  • This freeze occurred on January 18-20 and is comparable to the 1962 freeze. This freeze created the rare conditions in Florida for snow to stick to the ground. The freeze of 1977 also reinforced and accelerated grower movement south.

1981

  • Hard freezing temperatures arrived in Florida on January 12-14. This freeze was comparable to the freeze of 1977.

1983

  • This freeze was more severe than the 1977 and 1981 freezes. It occurred on December 24-25 and was so detrimental because the Frost Warning Service missed the forecast. By the time growers knew about the freeze, much of the damage was already done.

1985

  • The freeze of 1985 occurred on January 20-22. It was a hard freeze; however, its effects were felt so severely because growers had not yet recovered from the 1983 freeze. The combined effects of the freezes of 1983 and 1985 added up to an *impact freeze situation.

1989

  • This freeze occurred on December 22-26. This freeze was the fifth *impact freeze recorded in Florida history, however it was the second *impact freeze in a single decade, leaving growers little time to recover after the freezes of 1983 and 1985.

This was a big play in OJ futures at the Chicago BOT commodity market, portrayed in popular culture by the movie Trading Places, where Dan Aykroyd and Eddie Murphy corner the OJ futures market through insider info.
1613674825850.jpeg

Smart investors use the input of the likes of Piers Corbyn (contrarian climate scientist, brother of the British politician) to predict cold winters due to solar activity to place bets on agricultural futures.
 
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911

Peacock
Gold Member
I was in Houston over the last weekend people were losing their minds over it being 40 degrees in the daytime, being from Michigan I found it kinda comical that. People at the supermarket were acting like the apocalypse was starting, it was the beginning of covid all over again....really silly. I was also in Dallas for the stupid bowl way back when and it snowed, the cab drivers were afraid to drive anywhere it was a total mess they shut the city down the weekend they were hosting the stupid bowl. At one point I offered to drive the cab and the guy actually took me up on it my friends and I still laugh about that!

But when the blackouts starting happening this week that's when it became an actual issue instead of dumb people just being dumb and the media fear mongering. But even before that places were voluntarily shutting down even before it snowed and even before it went below freezing, again very silly.....god forbid you have to put on a coat.

It really is a ridiculous situation that in 2020 in a well off state such as Texas that everything would shut down and have to do rolling blackouts just because it's below freezing for a few days. I understand they don't have the infrastructure to deal with snow which was on the ground for all of one night but you're telling me they don't have the infrastructure to deal with increased demand for electricity? Can anyone explain to me how that is different from when it is 110 degrees and everyone has the AC on full blast?

It's much easier to insulate against the heat than against very cold weather. For heat, you just need to close your curtains/shutters and keep cold air from getting out, but for cold weather you have to have the whole house insulated. The AC cools off a house mostly through convection (pumping in cold air), while in winter you want to counteract loss of heat through conduction, which is pretty much impossible to do if the house is not properly insulated (double-glazed windows, wall and roof insulation etc). You will spend a lot more energy trying to heat up a poorly insulated house in subfreezing weather than cooling a normal house in 95F weather.

Convection is also a bigger issue in winter because the temperature gap between ambient and outside weather is much larger, about 70F, vs around 30F in your 105F heat wave.
 
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bucky

Ostrich
Just got off a conference call with a coworker who's in TX. It sounds miserable down there. One of the worst things is that no one has clothes for this. If the power went out in subzero temperatures where I am, I'd at least have a parka to put on.
 

estraudi

Pelican
Gold Member
Just got off a conference call with a coworker who's in TX. It sounds miserable down there. One of the worst things is that no one has clothes for this. If the power went out in subzero temperatures where I am, I'd at least have a parka to put on.
How dare you culturally appropriate a revered piece of clothing from the Nenets people!
You should be ashamed!
 
Just got off a conference call with a coworker who's in TX. It sounds miserable down there. One of the worst things is that no one has clothes for this. If the power went out in subzero temperatures where I am, I'd at least have a parka to put on.
For the past few years we really haven't had to wear winter clothing, shorts and t-shirts in the middle of winter. But yeah, everyone should have some kind of cold weather wear. The last time we had any real ice and cold the transimission went out in my car, the only other vehicle I had was a motorcycle to finish out the winter. Puts a whole new meaning on FTW (Forever Two Wheels).
 
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