That Hideous Strength by C.S. Lewis

Eusebius Erasmus

Kingfisher
Orthodox
If you want to understand Covid tyranny, and where our world is headed, I can highly recommend this book, along with Hugh Benson's Lord of the World. C.S. Lewis was an Oxford don, and therefore understood exactly what Britain's political and intellectual elite were up to. Prior to his conversion to Christianity, I would not be surprised if Lewis were part of Oxford's secret societies.

I haven't finished reading That Hideous Strength yet, but what follows are my observations thus far.

The novel (published in 1945) involves a young sociologist named Mark Studdock, who is married to a 23-year-old girl named Jane. Jane, a doctoral student, is a bit of a clairvoyant -- sadly, she's also a feminist.

As the novel progresses, Mark gets entangled with N.I.C.E (National Institute for Co-ordinated Experiments), an organization that ostensibly is about scientific research, but whose true intention is to bring about scientific dictatorship and satanic globalism.

Here are some choice quotes from the story.


1. The Elite's Depopulation Agenda Has Always Been Open.
During his discussion with Lord Feverstone, who works for N.I.C.E, Mark asks what sort of things the institute plans, and what his role would be within it. Lord Feverstone responds:
"Quite simple and obvious things, at first -- sterilization of the unfit, liquidation of backward races (we don't want any dead weights), selective breeding. Then real education, including pre-natal education... Of course, it'll have to be mainly psychological at first. But we'll get on to biochemical conditioning in the end and direct manipulation of the brain."

2. Elite Propaganda Appeals to, and then Subverts, Christian Values.
Feverstone explains that Mark is to write newspaper articles extolling the elite's depopulation agenda:
"No. We want you to write it down -- to camouflage it. Only for the present, of course. Once the thing gets going we shan't have to bother about the great heart of the British public. We'll make the great heart what we want it to be. But in the meantime, it does make a difference how things are put. For instance, if it were even whispered that the N.I.C.E. wants powers to experiment on criminals, you'd have all the old women of both sexes up in arms and yapping about humanity. Call it re-education of the mal-adjusted, and you have them all slobbering with delight that the brutal era of retributive punishment has at last come to an end. Odd thing is -- the word 'experiment' is unpopular, but not the word 'experimental.' You must's experiment on children, but offer the dear little kiddies free education at an experimental school attached to the N.I.C.E. and it's all correct."
Notice how vagueness and imprecision are part of the enemy's propaganda tools, as well as harmless-seeming acronyms ("N.I.C.E.").

3. The Horseshoe Theory.
Working-class, uneducated people do not easily fall for propaganda:
"Why you fool, it's the educated reader who can be gulled. All our difficulty comes with the others. When did you meet a workman who believes the papers? He takes it for granted that they're all propaganda and skips the leading articles. He buys his paper for the football results and the little paragraphs about girls falling out of windows and corpses found in Mayfair flats. He is our problem. We have to recondition him. But the educated public, the people who read the high-brow weeklies [New York Times, The Economist, etc.], don't need reconditioning. They're right already. They'll believe anything."

4. The Elite Hate Rural Communities.
Agrarian peoples are more self-sufficient, and less dependent on 'civilized' forces. Cosser, a N.I.C.E. sociologist, makes the following observations to Mark about a British village:
"We've got to make a report on Cure Hardy [the village]. We'll run out and have a look round tomorrow, but we can write most of the report today... If it's a beauty spot, you can bet it's unsanitary. That's the first point to stress. Then we've got to get out some facts about the population. I think you'll find it consists almost entirely of the two most undesirable elements -- small rentiers and agricultural labourers."

"...The Institute does not approve of [the farmer]. He's a very recalcitrant element in a planned community, and he's always backward. We're not going in for English agriculture."

5. Hints of the Great Reset.
A chemistry professor who quits the N.I.C.E. issues the following warning to Mark:
"And if I found chemistry beginning to fit in with a secret police run by a middle-aged virago who doesn't wear corsets and a scheme for taking away his farm and his shop and his children from every Englishman, I'd let chemistry go to the devil and take up gardening again... That's what happens when you study men: you find mare's nests. I happen to believe that you can't study men; you can only get to know them, which is quite a different thing. Because you study them, you want to make the lower orders govern the country and listen to classical music, which is balderdash. You also want to take away from them everything which makes life worth living and not only from them but from everyone except a parcel of prigs and professors."

6. Control of the Money Supply.
Mark, exasperated at not being paid, makes his frustrations known to the N.I.C.E.'s captain of police:
He confided to Captain O'Hara his minor financial anxieties. When was one paid? And in the meantime, he was short of petty cash. He had lost his wallet on his very first night at Belbury and it had never been recovered. O'Hara roared with laughter. 'Sure you can have any money you like by asking the Steward.'
"You mean it's then deducted from one's next cheque?" asked Mark.
"Man," said the Captain, "once you're in the Institute, God bless it, you needn't bother your head about that. Aren't we going to take over the whole currency question? It's we that make money."

7. The 'Social' Gospel.
There is a former vicar, Mr. Straik, who works at N.I.C.E. He believes that Christians should work to make earth into Paradise now, instead of waiting for Christ's Second Coming -- this is a common hallmark of the so-called Social Gospel, which has ruined many churches. Straik also hates 'organized religion' i.e. the Church:
"With every thought and vibration of my heart, with every drop of my blood," said Mr. Straik, "I repudiate that damnable doctrine. That is precisely the subterfuge by which the World, the organization and body of Death, has sidetracked and emasculated the teaching of Jesus, and turned into priestcraft and mysticism the plain demand of the Lord for righteousness here and now. The Kingdom of God is to be realized here -- in this world... At the name of Jesus every knee shall bow. In that name I dissociate myself completely from all the organized religion that has yet been seen in the world."
 
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JonW

Chicken
Am currently reading this as part of an online book club (dissidetreads if anyone is interested in joining). It is as disturbing as the first time I read The Screwtape Letters how well Lewis sees into the way evil works on people and what tactics are used to get others to go along and be subsumed by it.
This quote especially stood out, though it's hardly unique in it's impact.
"This was the first thing Mark had been asked to do which he himself, before he did it, clearly knew to be criminal. But the moment of his consent almost escaped his notice; certainly there was no struggle, no sense of turning a corner...for him, it all slipped past in a chatter of laughter, of that intimate laughter between fellow professionals, which of all earthly powers is strongest to make men do very bad things before they are yet, individually, very bad men."
It's honestly made it a bit hard to read, we've just gotten past chapter six so the 'fairy-land' portion of this fairy-tale is finally coming to the foreground.
 

Eusebius Erasmus

Kingfisher
Orthodox
I don’t want to give too much away, suffice to say that the novel involves trans-humanism and an effort to snuff out disease through ‘hygiene’ — a euphemism for central planning and social engineering.

There are hints of the elite’s plans for lab created food.

Also, it is possible that the N.I.C.E. are working for Satan.
 
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Easy_C

Peacock
More than "possible". If you have read the rest of the trilogy the context of NICE is put into place. the first two novels in series chronicle a man named Elwin Ransom's interactions with cosmic beings known as Oyarsa; because of the "fallen Oyarsa" which have turned to evil and control earth, the situation at the start of the series is that the planet is essentially quarantined with the fallen ones trapped inside the atmosphere of Earth. It's a fairly unambiguous literary device referencing angels although there is more than a passing similarity to some esoteric texts.
 

Pilgrim

Pigeon
Loved the whole Space Trilogy, though this, the final book, has been in my mind a lot this past year as I watch Britain beginning to descend into the kind of godless "scientific" lunacy described in the story.
 

Feyoder

Kingfisher
The whole trilogy is amazing. That hideous strength is not only prophetic but basically lays out their plans. Perelandria gave me chills it was so well written (and how well it captures just how women fall).

Strongly recommended. It's not purely allegorical (which I find a bit boring) but a really good and fun story too. I envy people who haven't read it before. It blew me away. The first book starts a little slow but you're in for an an extremely good time. Easy and enjoyable reading.
 

Papist

Robin
Am currently reading this as part of an online book club (dissidetreads if anyone is interested in joining). It is as disturbing as the first time I read The Screwtape Letters how well Lewis sees into the way evil works on people and what tactics are used to get others to go along and be subsumed by it.
This quote especially stood out, though it's hardly unique in it's impact.
"This was the first thing Mark had been asked to do which he himself, before he did it, clearly knew to be criminal. But the moment of his consent almost escaped his notice; certainly there was no struggle, no sense of turning a corner...for him, it all slipped past in a chatter of laughter, of that intimate laughter between fellow professionals, which of all earthly powers is strongest to make men do very bad things before they are yet, individually, very bad men."
It's honestly made it a bit hard to read, we've just gotten past chapter six so the 'fairy-land' portion of this fairy-tale is finally coming to the foreground.

I don’t want to give too much away, suffice to say that the novel involves trans-humanism and an effort to snuff out disease through ‘hygiene’ — a euphemism for central planning and social engineering.

There are hints of the elite’s plans for lab created food.

Also, it is possible that the N.I.C.E. are working for Satan.

More than "possible". If you have read the rest of the trilogy the context of NICE is put into place. the first two novels in series chronicle a man named Elwin Ransom's interactions with cosmic beings known as Oyarsa; because of the "fallen Oyarsa" which have turned to evil and control earth, the situation at the start of the series is that the planet is essentially quarantined with the fallen ones trapped inside the atmosphere of Earth. It's a fairly unambiguous literary device referencing angels although there is more than a passing similarity to some esoteric texts.

Loved the whole Space Trilogy, though this, the final book, has been in my mind a lot this past year as I watch Britain beginning to descend into the kind of godless "scientific" lunacy described in the story.

Guys - can I read That Hideous Strength independently, or do I need to read the other two first?
 

Easy_C

Peacock
Kinda both. It has a different protagonist than the other two books and is a self sufficient story unlike the other two. However the other two are both worth reading on their own and provide a lot of context to the events of the last book.
 

Hermetic Seal

Kingfisher
Orthodox
Gold Member
I read this last year and I was blown away by Lewis' foresight, he saw much of our current situation and all manner of societal decay coming 70-80 years in advance. A lot of things that might've seemed farfetched in the 1950s are eerily prescient today.
 

Papist

Robin
Just found an article published by Crisis Magazine:

Published in 1945 as the third volume of a series with Out of the Silent Planet and Perelandra, Lewis’ novel portrays the clash of two world views that reflect the cultural wars of the late twentieth and twenty-first centuries—the civilization of love versus the culture of death. Set in the quiet, rural village of Edgestow shielded from industrialization, the story portrays a beautiful college town that cherishes its legendary history, its traditional way of life in tune with Nature, and its peaceful idyllic surroundings.
continues: https://www.crisismagazine.com/2016/civilized-reader-c-s-lewis-hideous-strength
 
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