The 2020 Stock Market Crash Thread

Deepdiver

Crow
Gold Member
One of the best Sleep Well at night long term strategies is the Dow/Gold Trading Strategy - TLDR Buy Gold and Sell the Dow when Dow/Gold over 15 and sell Gold and Buy Dow when under 5.

On Dow/Gold Graph 1915 to Now - Dow/Gold Ratio End of Nov 2020 Ratio is 16.65 meaning a good time to sell Dow and hold Gold ...

The 5:03 PM PST gold price for December 03, 2020:
Gold $1840.66/oz
down.gif
-0.86, Dow = 29,991 divided by 1840 = 16.29 Dow/Gold Ratio:


1607043885430.png
 

Coja Petrus Uscan

Crow
Orthodox Inquirer
Gold Member
I have noticed that there seems to be a huge uptick in entry-level retail stock trading platform adverts, like Etoro and RobinTheHood.

Previously the interfaces were a bit to technical and the fees too high. I don't know how it exactly is in The US, but I had to pay $200 / year to The IRS to be able to trade. I also can't remember the trading prices, but seem to remember UK stocks or shares has a £8 execution order + whatever fee. For the average Joe that might have a few hundred notes to punt, that could be a considerable single-digit percent fee. $1,000 is your entry for stocks and even more for bonds. Many bonds can only be bought in $100,000 batches, some $10,000.

So such platforms have brought low-information people to the gambler.

Does anyone have any insights into this? Who is behind this?

It all seems very convenient, since central banks have gone into a mode in which they are doing everything they can to hold the economy up for maybe another decade, before it crashes and they execute the next phase of The Great Reset.
 

EndlessGravity

 
Banned
Protestant
Does anyone have any insights into this? Who is behind this?

In the US, it's zero commission trades and zero IRS fees outside whatever your taxes are. That's for junk platforms like Robinhood, which take about $.01 skim off your entries, both in and out. I can't speak to their options trades for skimming but it's crazy to me that people use that crappy platform for any serious trades.

Having dealt with some of their ranks, they seem to be staffed by idiots who don't fully understand trading or technology. I always assumed they were a bit of a ploy to get more liquidity into the markets, along with apps like Acorn.
 

Gimlet

Pelican
I am just some guy posting on the internet so take this with a lot of salt...

I bought shares of a junior silver miner on the recommendation of someone involved in the industry. Oroco Resources ticker symbol ORRCF. I paid .19 per share. This is the first penny stock I have ever bought in my life. Due with this information as you wish.

CP

This stock is now at $2.93. So thank you.
 

typtre

Woodpecker
Non-Christian
A new tax law in the US seems like it is kind of bearish for the stock market by year end.
Potential huge sell off to evade a higher tax on gains.
 

NoMoreTO

Hummingbird
Catholic
The market is down again today in a bad way. DIJA down 3.5% right now, NASDAQ 4.7%???

The price declines continue. Some were predicting a bounce, even a bear rally, but after yesterday's day slightly up, we continue the drop.
 

cosine

Woodpecker
The Fed has tightened its asset purchasing policies, but they haven't said that they will stop it. I still think we are in an asset inflation situation with a speed bump. If you compare most stock prices with February 2020 we're generally still dramatically higher.
 

MartyMcFly

Ostrich
Other Christian
The market is down again today in a bad way. DIJA down 3.5% right now, NASDAQ 4.7%???

The price declines continue. Some were predicting a bounce, even a bear rally, but after yesterday's day slightly up, we continue the drop.
The bottom is definitely not here until unemployment rates rise and housing prices drop to reasonable levels.

This article states the recession will likely be next year, but there will be a lot of volatility this year. Of course, he is guessing but I found this article much better than other advice ones. However, I don't agree with his idea of buying stocks in banks. They sometimes get hit hard during recessions. Solid car companies and banks can be very good buys during the recession though if you are patient. A more cautious idea is to set an entry price target to buy certain etfs and then gradually add to them each month using limit orders to buy during dips.

 

MartyMcFly

Ostrich
Other Christian
The Fed has tightened its asset purchasing policies, but they haven't said that they will stop it. I still think we are in an asset inflation situation with a speed bump. If you compare most stock prices with February 2020 we're generally still dramatically higher.
Good point. Target dropped 25% and is now $160. However, in Dec. 2019 before the plandemic it was $125. There is still a lot more room to fall.
Better to go by prices before the plandemic. There was a lot of panic from January-March 2020 which caused a collapse in prices. It is quite funny stocks did so well during the greatest pandemic in 100 years. This was another thing that made me suspicious.
 

C-Note

Hummingbird
Other Christian
Gold Member
We probably should start a new thread "2022-23 recession" or something like that.

From what I'm reading, the negative quarterly reports from Walmart yesterday and Target today is what caused the nosedive today. Both companies said that supply chain issues and the greatly increased price of transportation (fuel) were the main contributors to their unexpected declines. If inflation, especially on fuel and energy, continues at pace, then it seems to me that we're likely to see more market downturns over the next year or so, perhaps into recessionary territory.
 
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EndlessGravity

 
Banned
Protestant
We probably should start a new thread "2022-23 recession" or something like that.

From what I'm reading, the negative quarterly reports from Walmart yesterday and Target today is what caused the nosedive today. Both companies said that supply chain issues and the greatly increased price of transportation (fuel) were the main contributors to their unexpected declines. If inflation, especially on fuel and energy, continues at pace, then it seems to me that we're likely to see more market downturns over the next year or so, perhaps into recessionary territory.

You could even call it, oh idk, "the deflation thread," right @Blade Runner? :laughter: Who knows how interest rates correlate to bank reserv-- [cough, cough] I mean printed money though.
 
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