The Alt-Tech Revolution: Master Thread For Tech Ideas in an Age of Censorship

oilbreh

Woodpecker
duckduckgo is trash. The whole privacy thing is a lame marketing attempt, they just piggy back off google and collect even more data on you.
 
ivansirko said:
Start using this if you havent already:

http://www.rooshv.com/why-you-should-use-a-vpn-virtual-private-network-for-web-browsing

Avoid the 14 eyes. Stay the F off Tor. It sends unencrypted data.

There is truth in this.

https://www.wired.com/2007/09/rogue-nodes-turn-tor-anonymizer-into-eavesdroppers-paradise/

A security researcher intercepted thousands of private e-mail messages sent by foreign embassies and human rights groups around the world by turning portions of the Tor internet anonymity service into his own private listening post.

https://www.torproject.org/docs/faq.html.en#CanExitNodesEavesdrop

Can exit nodes eavesdrop on communications? Isn't that bad?

Yes, the guy running the exit node can read the bytes that come in and out there. Tor anonymizes the origin of your traffic, and it makes sure to encrypt everything inside the Tor network, but it does not magically encrypt all traffic throughout the Internet.

This is why you should always use end-to-end encryption such as SSL for sensitive Internet connections. (The corollary to this answer is that if you are worried about somebody intercepting your traffic and you're *not* using end-to-end encryption at the application layer, then something has already gone wrong and you shouldn't be thinking that Tor is the problem.)

As I see it, Tor can hide where you are, but not who you are. That can only be done by using it only for when you truly need it - keep it apart from your other web habits.

If you want to see RVF on Tor you are safe until you log onto Fag-Book in a new tab... then BOOM you are dead.

You will need to think of it as if this is a new life, apart from the one you have now. Act as if you cheat on your wife - new car, new shirt, new condo, new phone, new cash card - ALL must be kept clear from your first life.

On the topic of the OP - There is hope, but I shall wait and see; very easy to make up hype, but want to see some moves on the board. Cash is prob the most vital - from there, all else will flow.
 

redpillage

Ostrich
Gold Member
John Michael Kane said:
All good ideas. I think it starts with pushing an alt-tech conversation into existing platforms like faceborg and twatter. Once enough people are aware of alternative methods of connecting, let them ban the rest of our accounts on those platforms. The more people they ban, the harder it is to deny the censorship, but the bannings also can be used to increase alternative platform membership.

I think this right there really is the core of the matter. Right now banning is working against us as it reduces the number of voices that argue our side of the argument (which of course is the idea entirely). We need to turn this weakness into a competitive advantage, in that every time they ban someone they are not only losing a content producer but more and more viewers as well. The best needs to be led into destroying itself.
 
Another pressure point would be pointed towards investors. Make a big stink that censorship decreases new and active user bases, drives down engagement and reduces platform loyalty and revenue. If every man here could convince at least 10 other people to find alternatives, and have those ten people find ten more people, we could make a serious dent into their user bases. The key is having ready knowledge of alternatives. It isn't enough to say "twitter censorship sucks". You need to link them to www.gab.ai. Do this for enough people and the investors will start to question the wisdom of the SJW censorship. Investors may pay lip service to SJW ethos, but when the bottom line starts hurting, we'll see a reduction of this nonsense.

Additional resources:

EFF: https://www.eff.org (Covers a lot of digital rights and privacy issues. Has a left/libertarian hybrid bent, but still useful for knowing
Broadband Reports: https://www.broadbandreports.com/ (Great news source for covering ISP, domain and other tech issues from a public policy standpoint. Has been highly critical of Trump's FCC Chair with good reason, as he is an industry Swamp Creature.)
Muninetworks: https://muninetworks.org/ (A push for more smaller ISP access and to de-throne the dominance of mega-ISP's like AT&T, Comcast, Charter/Spectrum, etc. by building municipally-owned fiber optic networks.)
 

Valentine

Kingfisher
Gold Member
Great thread idea.

John Michael Kane said:
2. DNS access

Domain services, especially if pressured by left-wing groups are already under attack. Don't like someone? Call their domain registrar and tell them they are hosting a Nazi. Now their domain is locked and can't get transferred. We need legal action to be taken against domain registrars who block transfer or freeze accounts of domains that are NOT BEING USED FOR ILLEGAL PURPOSES.

Free-speech advocates must start suing registrars who freeze accounts and hold domains hostage for political reasons. Counter.fund might be an excellent place to start such a campaign once launched. Registrars need to defend any domain freeze as based in breaking the law, not offending SJWs.

While I think it certainly doesn't hurt to consider "alternative web" solutions, there's still plenty of internet freedom out there in the United States that needs defending. Easy of access of the current system is what brings a message to a mass audience.

We need to keep that access open and fight for every inch of it, and only use "alternative web" as a fallback in case we lose the first fight. "Alternative web" should be a secondary consideration, because it also makes it easier to brand it as "Dark Web 2.0" where only the mean, scary people hang out. We need the Web As We Know It to stay intact.

The problem is that the 'Web As We Know It' (clearnet/world wide web) is inherently centralised and thus compromised.

Instead of legal action against domain registrars we need technological solutions which can't be censored. ICANN control all Top-Level Domains (TLDs) on the clearnet and the registrars who are licensed by them are another centralised body of control.

Daily Stormer for example now have little chance of being on the clearnet as they've been kicked off domain registrars like GoDaddy, Google, Namecheap and more.

Several alt-tech solutions exist:
- Namecoin (.bit TLD)
- Emercoin (.emc, .coin, .lib and .bazar TLDs)
- Blockstack (.id TLD)
- Ethereum Name System (.eth TLD)

These domains however are still on the "dark web" as they are not normally accessible from a web browser. There are some solutions to this (from easiest to hardest):

1) Promote browser extensions like PeerName which are able to resolve these TLDs.

2) Promote decentralised apps (dApps) such as those run on Ethereum. If everyone started using MetaMask in their web browser or Mist browser on PC or Status on mobile then that's another way to access the decentralised web.

3) Push for changes in Google Chrome, Mozilla Firefox, Brave browser etc to integrate Peername or similar tech into their core stack so that web browsers can resolve these TLDs without needing to add browser extensions.

4) Push for changes in popular PC/mobile/router operating systems to make it easier to change the DNS IPs to more free public DNS services like OpenNIC which can resolve decentralised TLDs like Namecoin's.

None of these are easy solutions but when the clearnet is fundamentally simple to monitor and censor then we have to get creative.
 

Silver_Tube

Woodpecker
Gold Member
I wrote a couple paragraphs on my facebook the other day about why I am not very active on the site anymore.

It was half apology to my extended family and people who like to talk to me, and half criticism of how the platform has been behaving. I can't go into detail about what it said for obvious reasons. It got a lot of likes and replies and sounds like it made a few others question their activity on the site. Maybe if all the chads started telling their networks that facebook isn't cool anymore then it would make a significant dent. It doesn't have to be a dramatic 'I quit' sort of thing, and it is something that any of us could do fairly easily.
 

polar

Pelican
Gold Member
I'm no expert in this, but shareholder proposals are ways to get company policies updated and for management and other active shareholders to take notice:

According to the rules set forth by the US Securities & Exchange Commission (SEC), only shareholders who own more than $2,000 in stock or 1% of the company are permitted to initiate a shareholder proposal.

Once the proposal is submitted, the SEC rules require the company add the proposal to the agenda for voting the next annual shareholders meeting, unless the SEC provides special permission to exclude it from consideration.

The contact information for where to submit shareholder proposals is available on the company’s proxy statement from its most recent annual gathering. This will include the submission deadline, which is generally six months prior to the actual meeting. The point of contact is more than likely the corporate counsel.

Be timely. In many instances, the recommendation in a proposal is something management would prefer to ignore. Missing the deadline enable that to happen. And use a reliable shipping service that can provide a signed receipt of delivery.

You will need to attend the annual meeting to present your proposal, unless in the unlikely event management agrees to a vote without the proposing shareholder present. Carefully review the proxy statement to understand the rules of attendance and participation. It is also recommended to call ahead to overcome any potential issues or requirements for admission to the meeting.

Costs can vary. Aside from your time and effort, documentation filing and associated legal fees can run several thousand dollars.

Before you start to fire in shareholder proposals, carefully review your position. Ensure it is a practical resolution, one based on affecting a policy change, so you will need to research company by-laws. Consult an attorney, but do your research beforehand to make the best use of that billable time. And emotion and passion are fine for motivation, but base your decisions on sound logic and an objective perspective to ensure a shorter path to success.

In other words, you would need:
1) a non-profit or LLC to purchase $2,000 of a company's stock directly
2) draft a case against censorship, demonstrate how it hurts shareholder value, etc.
3) lawyer to help draft proposal
4) attend shareholder meeting in person to make your case
5) rally people to reach out to their brokers and proxy firms and state your case to them prior to voting https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Proxy_firm

This would be within the system and in a way that would require formal response by management. Better than "boycott this and that" when nobody actually has dollars at stake.
 

beta_plus

Pelican
How to learn developer skills for Alt-Tech?

What skills could one learn to assist with Alt-Tech? I work as a data analyst, and know a fair bit of programming, including data structures, databases, and object oriented programming, and though I'm not a world class expert, I have blog posts for very complex parts of programs that you have definitely heard of that are in the top 10 for google searches and at least 80,000 people have read. I tried to learn ruby on rails (which I understand was used to originally create Twitter) with kindle books and online sites and recently gave up in frustration due to too many gaps and assumptions of the reader's knowledge made in the material. I'm going to try Python Django since I already have quite a bit of experience and training with Python.

Can anyone provide any educational ideas/links to resources?
 

Silver_Tube

Woodpecker
Gold Member
gab.ai just got threatened by their dns provider and opted to remove an offensive post rather than lose their address:

https://medium.com/@getongab/we-are-at-war-for-a-free-and-open-internet-426629fba4bf

We believe this effort was coordinated and planned. We knew this day would come and now we have entered a crossroads with a very binary decision: remove one post or lose our domain and thus the entire website.
Our choice was very clear to me. The post needs to come down. If it does not, we lose our domain.

The free and open internet as we know it is under attack. It is centralized and controlled by no more than a handful of companies who provide these services:
Hosting
DDoS protection
Payment Processing
Domain Registrars
Mobile device hardware and software distribution
Without any of these things an individual website can not possibly compete and operate at scale. If left unchecked, these centralized platforms will continue their dominance and control the means of all information, personal data, and communication on the internet.
 

Rush87

Hummingbird
Stocks in Alt-Tech companies would be an incredible investment once they are up and running. At least a third of the US market would be ready to jump ship if a viable alternative entered the mainstream by the end of Trump's second term.
 

Valentine

Kingfisher
Gold Member
beta_plus said:
What skills could one learn to assist with Alt-Tech? I work as a data analyst, and know a fair bit of programming, including data structures, databases, and object oriented programming, and though I'm not a world class expert, I have blog posts for very complex parts of programs that you have definitely heard of that are in the top 10 for google searches and at least 80,000 people have read. I tried to learn ruby on rails (which I understand was used to originally create Twitter) with kindle books and online sites and recently gave up in frustration due to too many gaps and assumptions of the reader's knowledge made in the material. I'm going to try Python Django since I already have quite a bit of experience and training with Python.

Can anyone provide any educational ideas/links to resources?

You could learn Solidity, it's an object oriented programming language for smart contracts, most notably for Ethereum.

Or create a dApp e.g. a clone of Uber, Airbnb, Facebook etc.
 

redpillage

Ostrich
Gold Member
Rush87 said:
Stocks in Alt-Tech companies would be an incredible investment once they are up and running. At least a third of the US market would be ready to jump ship if a viable alternative entered the mainstream by the end of Trump's second term.

Yup, and wait until Amazon's new show 'Black America' comes out, that'll stir the old race war pot quite a bit over the coming years. We don't just need alt-tech - we need alt-everything at this point. And by 'we' I am not referring to white people but conservative Americans of all colors. We are heading down a very dark future if we don't nip this in the butt right now and right here.
 

Orson

Kingfisher
As so many have said, this is inspired!

Perhaps another thread is in order? Devoted to defining the levels of security one ought to seek to gain, given one's needs and objectives. (Or is there already such a thread?) Casual online use is not the same as frequent and business level needs, for example.

This should be a worthwhile fixed thread for frequent community (re-)education, as well.

The latest news of the Equifax hack unleashing private data for about half of all Americans (but some Brits and Canadians as well), points to the fact that this is a growth industry.

An enormous growth industry!
 
Does anyone have any suggestions on alt tech services for purchasing domain names?
Yat?


I'm not 100% how it works and it seems like it's a paid service.


"duckduckgo is trash. The whole privacy thing is a lame marketing attempt, they just piggy back off google and collect even more data on you."
Yikes. I was using swisscows for a while but got annoyed when they won't let me do calculations without pulling up a calculator app. Firefox also apparently sold out to Google. Looks like a lot of search engines are getting gobbled up by big tech.
 
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