The 'Ask a tradesman' thread

Tex Cruise

Kingfisher
I don't think it's a "secret latch" as such, just that you may be able to push directly on the part of the latch that the release cable pulls against. I have done it on a few different cars over the years. Just went and had a look on my F100 . It's a mid 80s model and may be a different setup to yours, but it's hood latch is a mostly enclosed unit unlike other cars. Though I can reach through the grille quite easily I couldn't see any obvious way to pop the catch, and then it started raining so I had to give up.

Maybe look at a picture of the hood latch for your particular model, work out where the inner cable attatches and see if you can see where it is through the grille.
 

roberto

Pelican
Gold Member
When it smashed down, there's a high chance some of the mechanism bent and now won't release. Have a buddy push down hard on the bonnet repeatedly whilst you try to pull the cable.
 

Bolly

Pelican
Thanks gents. Appreciate the help. I don't know what i did but i got it eventually by pure luck i believe. A crowbar, a screwdriver and a couple more beers did the trick. But man i was getting pissed. Not how i like to spend a Sunday. Haha. We should all just go back to horses ;). If it breaks just shoot it and get a new one.
 
Can any plumbers or others with a good deal of plumbing experience here send me a pm? I have some questions but since this forum is constantly scouted by crazies I'd rather discuss things over PM than possibly risk compromising info.
 

kel

Pelican
I made some furniture years ago with pine boards and cedar 4x4s, and I'm proud of it, but of course it's just a little wobbly and more irritatingly the boards aren't flat. I should've put them through a planer, but I didn't know at the time (the idea that the lumberyard would sell would that wasn't flat seemed strange to me and still does, wouldn't end consumers like me almost categorically prefer flat boards?), is there anything I can do to tighten things up now? In general, how does one get nice, crisp right angles when, say, attaching legs (wood or metal) to a tabletop?
 
I made some furniture years ago with pine boards and cedar 4x4s, and I'm proud of it, but of course it's just a little wobbly and more irritatingly the boards aren't flat. I should've put them through a planer, but I didn't know at the time (the idea that the lumberyard would sell would that wasn't flat seemed strange to me and still does, wouldn't end consumers like me almost categorically prefer flat boards?), is there anything I can do to tighten things up now? In general, how does one get nice, crisp right angles when, say, attaching legs (wood or metal) to a tabletop?

Boards are rough-sawn at a mill, then dried, then planned to final size. Drying can via air-drying in huge stacks of wood with "stickers" in between them. Or it can be in a kiln / dehumidifier. Lumber is called out by its rough sawn size (like a 2 X 4") but that is before planing (where a 2 X 4 becomes 1 1/2 X 3 1/2").

Everything from a lumber mill should be flat when it leaves the mill. The issue is that even a perfectly flat and straight board from the mill will change over time. Sometimes even before it ends up at the local lumber yard. A craftsman takes that into account. First by carefully examining every single board they buy, and then by how they design their projects and how each piece of wood used for a project is selected given how that wood is likely to move around in the future. Yesterday I went to buy some boards for a project, and sorted through a dozen or more to find two that were mostly OK.

Most boards will try to cup over time. The edges of the two sides length-wise on a board that were closest to the outside of the tree will tend to warp up. That is just what boards do. One strategy is to use quarter-sawn boards, if you can find them. Another is to alternate boards so even out the cupping. Or, just look at the design--if a board is going to cup, which direction for it to cup in would be the least worst? Wood also expands and contracts with humidity. Large boards have to be free to move to some degree or they will split--table tops are a good example of that. A cabinet maker or furniture maker understands how wood moves and works with it, not against it. A good one will also select each piece of wood for each part of a project so the grain matches for appearance.
 

Deepdiver

Crow
Gold Member
Cheap solution - drill holes in the bottom of the legs/corners and then get some screw in rubber bottom furniture levelers at Lowes or Home Depot... That will allow you to level out the wobbly furniture even on an uneven floor.
 

kel

Pelican
The wobble is more from where the leg meets the top, rather than at the bottom, just because of the warping of the top board which then doesn't meet the relatively flat sanded 4x4 leg correctly. Overall it's nice, especially for someone who'd never done anything like that before and was just making up the design on the spot. My original plan was to use dowels to attach the legs to the top and I'm amazed that anyone is able to get that to work, I measured very careful and drilled equally carefully and still they just didn't line up, so I moved to brackets instead.

I also made a standing desk (with pipe legs) and the wobble there is much more of an issue because it's higher so the effect is more dramatic. I'm still thinking of how to even that out a little bit.
 
Here is a random link about how wood changes shape: http://www.woodworkdetails.com/knowledge/wood/movement

To line up dowel holes, there are inexpensive tools to help with that: https://www.leevalley.com/en-us/sho...g/marking-tools/44995-dowel-and-tenon-centers The link is to a company with really good tools and supplies for sale, but these can sometimes be found at home centers and hardware stores next to dowels. Drill one hole. Put the correct-sized center, put the other board where it needs to go, and whack it with a mallet. Leaves a perfect indent where to drill the corresponding hole.
 

Leads

Robin
My realm is the acoustic guitar and I enjoy helping folks turn a $80 beater into an instrument on par with Martins costing $3k+. I've picked up some rare tips from master luthiers over the decades. Cool infos that are often trapped in their workshops

The yamaha FG series (red label is best) and can still be found on the cheap. Basically, they were made in japan the 70s/80's before mass production lowered the bar (wood, QA, etc). Also Alvarez/Yairi. Basically find one in good shape (no cracks, warped neck/body, etc) and from there, replace the plastic saddle/nut with a bone saddle/nut. Experiment with string gauges and alternate tunings.

Makes for a fun offline/offgrid activity and practicing increases problem solving skills as well as pattern recognition skills. Also makes you more attractive to the laydeez.
 

kel

Pelican
I've been wanting to learn the piano. You can find a lot of free pianos on craigslist and other type places if you're willing to move them, and many of them look very sharp. I'm sure they need a tune up, and some are probably deceptively beautiful but lost causes acoustically, but I bet you could get a multi-thousand-dollar piano for free (minus your time and some tools) if you're handy and willing to do it. I'm thinking about it.
 
Top