The Bread Thread (and Other, Assorted Baked Goods)

How do we not have a bread thread? It being so central to the faith. @Roosh talked about making pizza and cornbread on his stream this week, so...why not a thread for all items baked? Cakes, pastries, pies, tarts, quiches, cookies, scones, crackers, pretzels, everything goes.

I'll go first!

We were struggling with a pizza dough that wasn't like crappy school lunch pizza. You know what I mean: more like bread than pizza. However, then we found this recipe this week and it was very good. A little more basic and bland than we like but a base that can probably be bulked up and flavored for a fine pie.

 
Back in the day I worked in a pizzaria that made its own dough. Our mix was pretty close to that but we subbed oregano for Mrs. Dash and added a cup of honey to the mix. Its sad I forget the other proportions now, but each batch was enough for 15 pizzas.

I have some buckwheat and plantain flour at home I bought at the beginning of the pandemic. Im excited to try plantain cookies.

Plantain Flour - Never Knew it was a Thing 6 mos Ago.
 

911

Peacock
Gold Member
we have a thread for homemade bread here:

 
Our mix was pretty close to that but we subbed oregano for Mrs. Dash and added a cup of honey to the mix.

I forgot to mention we skipped the Mrs. Dash which is probably why it was more bland. I'll have to give the honey and oregano a try.

We've been baking tons of different stuff.

we have a thread for homemade bread here:

That's right! I even commented on it. Didn't come up in search. :hmm:
 

Roosh

Cardinal
We can keep this thread for flour-related goods.

I tackle the bread world one recipe at a time. Otherwise it can be overwhelming because there is both science and art involved. I find a recipe and I try to master it, tinkering along the way.

One thing that helps is to have a cooking journal that is like a laboratory notebook. I write down the date, amounts I use, protocol, and notes on the result, along with how to change it the next time. Otherwise, you will simply not remember what changes to make when you cook it again. When you "finalize" a recipe, you no longer need to log it.

The best advice I can give new bakers is to get a scale that weighs to the tenth of a gram. With a new recipe, I convert all the cup/spoon measurements to grams and then work from that. By doing so, it's effortless to scale a recipe.

I'm currently working on sesame cookies, chocolate chip cookies, cornbread muffins, pancakes, and pizza. If you need tips on them, let me know.
 
Generally the less processed the flour. The better the GI. One should aim for low GI to slow carbohydrate absorption.

And to reduce the risks of diabetes and insulin spikes.

Also recommend Ezekiel Bread:

Due to the sprouting process, Ezekiel bread may contain more of some vital nutrients.

Studies show that sprouting grains increases their lysine content (1Trusted Source).

Lysine is an amino acid that many plants contain in only low amounts. Increasing its levels through sprouting, increases the nutritional value of grains and seeds considerably.

Also, combining the grains (wheat, millet, barley and spelt) with the legumes (soybeans and lentils) may somewhat improve the protein quality (2Trusted Source).

Studies also show that sprouting wheat may lead to significant increases in soluble fiber, folate, vitamin C, vitamin E and beta-carotene (3Trusted Source, 4Trusted Source).

Sprouting also partially breaks down the starch, since the seed uses the energy in the starch to fuel the sprouting process. For this reason, sprouted grains have slightly fewer carbohydrates (5Trusted Source).

By sprouting the seeds, Ezekiel bread should be more nutritious than most other types of bread.



Sprouted grains also have lower numbers of antinutrients, which are substances that inhibit the absorption of minerals:

  • Phytic acid is a substance found in grains and seeds. It can bind minerals like zinc, calcium, magnesium and iron and prevent them from being absorbed. Sprouting modestly reduces phytic acid (6).
  • Enzyme inhibitors are also present in seeds. They protect them from spontaneously germinating but may also make the nutrients in them harder to access. Sprouting inactivates some of them (7, 8).
Another benefit of sprouting is that it reduces the amount of gluten, a protein to which many people are intolerant and which is found in wheat, spelt, rye and barley (3Trusted Source).

Due to the reduction in antinutrients, Ezekiel bread may provide a higher number of nutrients than bread made from grains that have not sprouted.


 

tractor

Robin
@Roosh talked about making pizza

Haha, Roosh inspired for the homemade pizza too :) man, the dough struggle is REAL!!!

I've read recently that thin pizzas should be baked in a stone stove (or something that can give 500°C). Thick pizzas are better suited for a normal kitchen oven (max. 250-280°C)

A thin pizza needs less hydration (appr. 60% water), a thick pizza needs up to 75%.

I'm not sure it these rules are carved into stone or something but I kinda felt that my homemade thin pizzas were a bit dry and stiff like plywood. The problem is that I can't handle the dough if I add more water. I just can't knead the damn thing, it's all to sticky.

Is there a way to deal with it?
What's your advice for a good pizza that's not too thick and not to dry/crispy in general?
 

tractor

Robin
So, I baked the best pizza of my life today!

The pizza crust had the exact amount of inner fluffiness and outer crispness. I cut the pizza into pieces with almost no crumbs.

If you're interested in my recipe, here it is (I'm in Europe, so I don't use lbs, oz or other measuring units often used in the U.S.)

ingredients for the dough (for a square-shaped baking plate, 29x36 cm)
240 ml water
320 g flour
1,5-2 g yeast
7g salt (if any)
8g olive oil

preparing the dough

1. Dissolve the yeast in the water.
2. Add flour in portions.
3. After stirring in half or 2/3 of the flour add salt and olive oil.
4. Add the rest of the flour.

After you mixed all ingredients into a uniform mass, falt it many times. Leave it in a covered bowl for about 15 min. Then falt it again. Leave it for another 15 min. Then falt it one last time. Put it back in the bowl. Leave it for at least 12 h in the fridge. So, it's better to prepare the dough in the evening. Next morning, take the bowl out of the fridge and let the yeast work. After 1 h, falt it again multiple times. Leave it in the bowh for 4h. The dough is ready.

baking
1. Preheat the oven at 250°C.
2. Spread the dough on the baking plate.
3. Pre-bake it for 10 minutes.
4. Put the topping on the crust.
5. Bake for another 10 minutes.

That's it.
 

tractor

Robin
After you mixed all ingredients into a uniform mass, falt it many times. Leave it in a covered bowl for about 15 min. Then falt it again. Leave it for another 15 min. Then falt it one last time. Put it back in the bowl. Leave it for at least 12 h in the fridge. So, it's better to prepare the dough in the evening. Next morning, take the bowl out of the fridge and let the yeast work. After 1 h, falt it again multiple times. Leave it in the bowh for 4h. The dough is ready.

I meant "fold" of course. Not "falt" (it's German)
 

Salinger

Kingfisher
I want to make these paleo grasshopper bars: https://wholenewmom.com/no-bake-grasshopper-bars/

Coconut-Avocado-Grasshopper-Bars-Horiz.jpg
 

tractor

Robin
I want to make these paleo grasshopper bars: https://wholenewmom.com/no-bake-grasshopper-bars/

I tried some paleo baking recipes in the past. The only thing I liked were "muesli" bars (with no cereal in it of course).

I tried paleo pizza (with coconut flour and eggs), it tasted like :poo: and was hard on my stomach. Not to mention that the pizza crust was very fragile.
I don't want to even imagine what paleo bread tastes like. :laughter:
 

tractor

Robin
One of my recent creations. Crispy & fluffy!
For the topping, I took some smoked pork belly cut in cubes, two onions and chopped tomatos.
 

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I highly recommend trying sourdough, I like it better than regular homemade bread I've made and because of the phytic acid it's a lot better for your gut.
I go by this recipe except I only use white and wheat flour, and he also has a video on how to make your own starter in a week. It's a lot easier than it sounds and the only ingredients are flour and water.
 

tractor

Robin
I highly recommend trying sourdough, I like it better than regular homemade bread I've made and because of the phytic acid it's a lot better for your gut.
I go by this recipe except I only use white and wheat flour, and he also has a video on how to make your own starter in a week. It's a lot easier than it sounds and the only ingredients are flour and water.

Great. The sourdough is on my to-do list after I bring my pizza and yeast bread close to perfection :)

What kind of pot do you use? Cast iron, clay or something else? I need an advice before I buy one.
 
Don't be fooled. @Roosh can make a good pie but how's his hand when it comes to pasta dishes? That is the real test. I'm probably starting a perfect gnocchi journey this month.

Pray for me, gnocchi is a deceptively simple dish and a challenge to perfect.

I also thought you might enjoy this article, on the most rare pasta in the world, Su filindeu, literally "threads of God." To eat it though, you must first take the 20 mile pilgrimage on foot in the dark for the biannual Feast of San Francesco.

 
Great. The sourdough is on my to-do list after I bring my pizza and yeast bread close to perfection :)

What kind of pot do you use? Cast iron, clay or something else? I need an advice before I buy one.

You're supposed to use a cast iron or dutch oven but I use a stainless steel just because I haven't bought a dutch oven yet.
 

BoiBoi

Pelican
I bought a fancy staub cocotte cast iron pot and used it for the first time today. My mind was blow when I opened the lid, I made perfect bread with a perfect crust. Delicious.
 
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