The Canada Political Thread

Nemausus

Woodpecker
Gold Member
Good post by @uncledick in the Trump thread that can be shared here to kick-start some discussion.

Trumps reelection chances are looking iffy, but if he loses I am partially grateful im in Canada to the extent that I dislike violence, aggressive confrontation and torture. I have great sympathy for the center/right patriots that voted for Trump because your left is much more violent, vengeful and aggressive than the Canadian left. The outcomes of the USA and Canada are ultimately the same. Complete leftist/corporate authoritarianism. Canada will probably reach it first, but the path for the USA will be much bloodier and aggressive. The left for all intents and purposes already owns Canada and feels comfortable in this position. They have won all the important elections over the last 60 years and have mostly shaped this country into their image. They'll use soft power tactics until their opposition dies off, is demographically replaced, or is properly "educated" over the next couple of decades. The American left coming off the insult of trump winning and 4 years of extreme TDS, is going to punish and humiliate trump voters every single day if Biden wins, where as in Canada, humiliation is once a week, with limited aggression and with a unique Canadian politeness to all its totalitarianism.

The point being, the likelihood of government enforcers breaking into badwhytes houses/businesses/communities in the USA to arrest, terrorize or kill them is substantially higher in the USA then in Canada within the next 10 years. The irony is, this strongman enforcement could mean that Americans are in a better position to fight back, where as in Canada the soothing soft authoritarianism will lure us into submission.
How much race riot carnage do you guys think will spill over across the border?

I barely consume any mainstream news these days, 5 minute radio headlines at most. I just loaded CBC News on my smartphone and they seem to be trying to duplicate the US George Floyd news, with a story about a cop beating up a black kid in Toronto, three years ago. That is one city I'll be steering clear of.

How do you guys think things will play out in our major cities?

Big city life appeals to me a lot less than it did a few years ago, especially post-pandemic. I'm thinking of settling in one Ontario's second tier cities going forward. Something in the 50,000-300,000 population range. I'm not quite ready to go full rural yet, as I enjoy some of the amenities that medium size cities offer, such as: a decent library, coffee shops, multiple grocery stores (more sales & variety), movie theatres, some restaurants and bars. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_population_centres_in_Ontario

Curious to hear what you guys think about what's going on in the U.S. and how it may impact our life up here.
 

scotian

Crow
Gold Member
Good post by @uncledick in the Trump thread that can be shared here to kick-start some discussion.



How much race riot carnage do you guys think will spill over across the border?

I barely consume any mainstream news these days, 5 minute radio headlines at most. I just loaded CBC News on my smartphone and they seem to be trying to duplicate the US George Floyd news, with a story about a cop beating up a black kid in Toronto, three years ago. That is one city I'll be steering clear of.

How do you guys think things will play out in our major cities?

Big city life appeals to me a lot less than it did a few years ago, especially post-pandemic. I'm thinking of settling in one Ontario's second tier cities going forward. Something in the 50,000-300,000 population range. I'm not quite ready to go full rural yet, as I enjoy some of the amenities that medium size cities offer, such as: a decent library, coffee shops, multiple grocery stores (more sales & variety), movie theatres, some restaurants and bars. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_population_centres_in_Ontario

Curious to hear what you guys think about what's going on in the U.S. and how it may impact our life up here.
I don’t think any Canadian cities will riot like we’ve seen state side, we’re very similar countries but different in many ways. Although we have large population of historically oppressed people, the Natives, they mostly live outside of the cities and other than ripping off a few bottles of booze from stores, I’ve never heard of Natives looting en masse or burning buildings.

That being said, we have had some serious issues with Natives in the past, some of the worst in recent memory were the train blockages all over Canada in protest of an LNG plant being built in BC, they really messed up our economy, my home city of Halifax was majorly affected when the port had to re-route ship traffic to the eastern seaboard of the US.

The Natives have the ability to screwup the country pretty bad but I could see public support in Canada turning against them fast, especially out west where their numbers are high. I can’t see new immigrants really giving a shit about the Natives either, a poor Chinese farmer who’s grandfather died during Mao’s Cultural Revolution probably won’t want to pay for Johnny Two Feather’s welfare and house because his great grandad got fingered in the butthole by a priest in the 30s, an experience that wasn’t unique to Natives either.

Trudeau is throwing money around and spending like a drunken sailor, Canadians are chilling on pogey and legal weed, the weather is nice and Covid restrictions are lifting. Besides shit heads vandalizing statues and calling for the removal of old white men’s names from building, I don’t expect to see the levels of violence we saw in the US.
 

scotian

Crow
Gold Member
As for the relocating, I just did that, I literally bought a 4X4 truck yesterday morning in Edmonton, packed it full of stuff and drove nine hours west across the Rockies to a smaller city of 100K in the BC interior where I got a company transfer to work on the pipeline that all the hippies and eco-freaks were losing their minds over recently. It’s a red neck pulp and paper/lumber town so lots of pick ups around and it’s majority white at 82%, 10% Native and 8% immigrants, mostly Punjabis from what I’ve seen with of course some Filipinos and Nigerian looking students from the local uni. Fortunately the local Natives seem pretty chill, many bands are quite successful in BC and the pipeline will employ a ton of locals.

I had moved to Vancouver in mid-January and started a job at my company’s local office and was living in a majority Chinese building in East Van. The apartment was my Chinese buddy’s who was away pipelining for the winter, my plan was to get my own place once he got back in March and stay in Van. Then covid happened and my buddy came back to his place so I decided to take a job offer my company had through the union at a remote work camp near Fort McMurray. I was up there for about ten weeks watching the world go crazy and decided to act on plans that I’ve had for years of getting away from the bigger cities for awhile.

I’m currently staying at my buddy’s place here, he’s a crazy Newfie who likes to chase avalanches on his skidoo, he has a bunch of guns and loves hunting. We spent the evening cleaning a couple of rifles that we’re to shoot in the woods this weekend. I’ve gone hunting a bunch of times with friends over the past few years to learn how to gut and dress the animal, hang it and butcher it. I’ve helped them with moose, deer and elk so hopefully I’ll be ready for next hunting season, I’ll be buying a hunting rifle of my own soon.

By the end of the year I’d like to have a freezer full of wild meat and fish, I’ll go fishing on my own because it’s amazing here but to fill the freezer with salmon, I’ll try to find some Native dudes who’ll sell me some for cash, maybe Laner has a link? I’ve gone crabbing in Victoria, it’s super easy and on a good day you can catch an impressive feed of crab between a couple of people. I’ll have to find a crabbing spot on the mainland. Another future goal is having a garden but until then fresh organic fruit and veggies are easy to get here in BC.

I grew up in a small lobster fishing village and always saw myself getting back to the sticks one day. I spent enough time in big cities and will continue to visit and hopefully work in them from time to time but as I approach 40, I’d rather live in a more peaceful, less chaotic setting and fortunately my job allows that.
 
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Dr. Howard

Peacock
Gold Member
I don’t think any Canadian cities will riot like we’ve seen state side, we’re very similar countries but different in many ways. Although we have large population of historically oppressed people, the Natives, they mostly live outside of the cities and other than ripping off a few bottles of booze from stores, I’ve never heard of Natives looting en masse or burning buildings.

That being said, we have had some serious issues with Natives in the past, some of the worst in recent memory were the train blockages all over Canada in protest of an LNG plant being built in BC, they really messed up our economy, my home city of Halifax was majorly affected when the port had to re-route ship traffic to the eastern seaboard of the US.

The Natives have the ability to screwup the country pretty bad but I could see public support in Canada turning against them fast, especially out west where their numbers are high. I can’t see new immigrants really giving a shit about the Natives either, a poor Chinese farmer who’s grandfather died during Mao’s Cultural Revolution probably won’t want to pay for Johnny Two Feather’s welfare and house because his great grandad got fingered in the butthole by a priest in the 30s, an experience that wasn’t unique to Natives either.

Trudeau is throwing money around and spending like a drunken sailor, Canadians are chilling on pogey and legal weed, the weather is nice and Covid restrictions are lifting. Besides shit heads vandalizing statues and calling for the removal of old white men’s names from building, I don’t expect to see the levels of violence we saw in the US.
I agree, Canada has been prepped for an urban globohomo soft kill. There will be no rioting because there is no resistance.

Canada is also large enough that I don't think that a hostile government will waste the time to go out to every remote location in the country to hunt down Mennonites as long as they don't show up in the provincial capitals to cause problems.

If a white person really wanted to drop out of society in Canada and live free, it is easy to do, but not glamorous. Go marry a native and live on the reservation, hunt, fish and farm. Or just go buy some farmland in the north and do the same.

For urban canadians wondering just how remote you can get, let me give you one example...

In the early 2000s a forestry company I worked for bought up some abandoned rail lines in northern ontario and tore up the tracks and converted the rail bed to a logging road. There was a settlement along this rail line that had never had road access previously, there were probably 30 people living there. They previously had to get to town via snowmobile in winter or float plane in summer...yet they somehow got by. It was not a glamorous existence but they survived.
 

Brother Abdul Majeed

Kingfisher
Gold Member
I agree, Canada has been prepped for an urban globohomo soft kill. There will be no rioting because there is no resistance.

Canada is also large enough that I don't think that a hostile government will waste the time to go out to every remote location in the country to hunt down Mennonites as long as they don't show up in the provincial capitals to cause problems.
They don't need to hunt down Mennonites.

Skip to 2.30 if you don't want to watch the whole video and watch for about 30 seconds.

Mennonites are behind a lot of the protests going on in Canada. Things are clearly not what they seem.
 

kel

Pelican
In the early 2000s a forestry company I worked for bought up some abandoned rail lines in northern ontario and tore up the tracks and converted the rail bed to a logging road. There was a settlement along this rail line that had never had road access previously, there were probably 30 people living there. They previously had to get to town via snowmobile in winter or float plane in summer...yet they somehow got by. It was not a glamorous existence but they survived.
What kind of people were these? How all were they living and where did they go once your company, presumably, evicted them?
 

scotian

Crow
Gold Member
In the past week I drove about 26 hours all over northern Alberta and through BC, I went from Fort McMurray>Cold Lake>Edmonton>Kamloops>Prince George>Dawson Creek and besides the cities, the entire region is pretty empty except for small towns. I passed by a ton of farms, ranches, mines and pulp/lumber mills some of these areas are really nice too especially from Hinton into Jasper and west of the Rockies around McBride and Valemount. Cache Creek and Clinton are both nice little towns that aren’t too remote and the Pine Pass area around Chetwynd is great for hunting/fishing and other outdoor activities year round.

Basically all of these areas are nice places to live, pretty much all white and have decent economies based on forestry/mining/oil/gas. i spent about three months working in Chetwynd last year on natural gas pipelines and it’s busy again this year with the Coastal Gas pipeline construction that will carry gas from Fort St John to Kitimat, it’s the one that they were protesting all over the country earlier this year.

Any guy who wants to work could easily move to a city/town like Fort McMurray, Grande Prairie, Dawson Creek, Prince George or Kamloops and be able to find a decent paying job and live a nice lifestyle, especially if you like the “all Canadian” type of lifestyle so hockey, hunting, fishing, boating, hiking, skiing, quadding, etc.
 
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scotian

Crow
Gold Member
I agree, Canada has been prepped for an urban globohomo soft kill. There will be no rioting because there is no resistance.

Canada is also large enough that I don't think that a hostile government will waste the time to go out to every remote location in the country to hunt down Mennonites as long as they don't show up in the provincial capitals to cause problems.

If a white person really wanted to drop out of society in Canada and live free, it is easy to do, but not glamorous. Go marry a native and live on the reservation, hunt, fish and farm. Or just go buy some farmland in the north and do the same.

For urban canadians wondering just how remote you can get, let me give you one example...

In the early 2000s a forestry company I worked for bought up some abandoned rail lines in northern ontario and tore up the tracks and converted the rail bed to a logging road. There was a settlement along this rail line that had never had road access previously, there were probably 30 people living there. They previously had to get to town via snowmobile in winter or float plane in summer...yet they somehow got by. It was not a glamorous existence but they survived.
I used to work with a Newfie in Fort Mac who would fly home to St John’s, drive three hours to a wharf where he’d leave the truck and get into his father’s boat and ride 45 minutes to their small, isolated town of 500 people. There’s no vehicles on the island, they get around with ATVs, boats and skidoos, neither of his parents have ever had their driver’s licenses. He bought his house from his school teacher for $50,000 and put 30K of upgrades into it, all cash. He’s married to his high school sweet heart and they have three kids, plenty of moose/bird hunting there and of course lots of fish.
 

uncledick

Woodpecker
Ive been off work for a few weeks due to a surgery and have had lots of time to burn. Ive reread some of my favorite dystopian books and I think I found a good analogy between Canada and the USAs remorseless path towards complete leftist/corporate authoritarian rule. Canada is more likely to follow "A Brave New World" and the USA will follow "1984", both paths lead to more or less the same totalitarian destination, but anybody who has read those books know very well which is the softer and which is the harder approach.

If pain and suffering are anathema to you, like it is for me, at least in Canada the left/progs/globalists will extinct the center/right with minimal violence and torture..
 

doc holliday

Pelican
Gold Member
I think that's a pretty good description of the paths that the USA and Canada will follow uncledick. In the US it could end up being more like 1984, a harsher approach because there are a still a lot Americans who will resist and fight the onset of this dystopia, hence a harsher response by totalitarians. Like Dr. Howard said, I think Canadians have quietly accepted their fate without a whole lot of resistance, comforting themselves by saying "at least we're not like Americans". Soma was a powerful sedative used in Brave New World and Canadians do seem to be more"Soma-ized" at this point and have put up far less resistance to globohomo. For my personality and my tendency to firmly put up resistance and fight hard, the American way suits me better than the quiet acquiescence of Canadians which is why I left Canada a long time ago. It is definitely a much more painful and violent path though, without a doubt.
 

NoMoreTO

Pelican
Economic Snapshot finally comes out. Deficit will 343 Billion in 2020. Total Spending in Harpers Final Year was $283 Billion.

Requested Funding from Auditor General of 11 million was denied, Crystia Freeland gets 15M

Real GDP expected to drop at 9.6% without 2nd wave, but with "mild" 2nd wave Real GDP drops by 11%.

The Canada Party is coming to an abrupt end, we knew it was past midnight and the best part of the night was passed. Now we can feel that early hangover you get even before heading to sleep is coming on - I can feel it. When we wake up its gonna be pain. Taxes. Taxes. Taxes.

Below Pierre P does a good job spelling out the full state of retardation this country is in.
 

Dr. Howard

Peacock
Gold Member
What kind of people were these? How all were they living and where did they go once your company, presumably, evicted them?
The company didn't evict, because the company leases the timber rights from the government any roads they build are also public access. So the people in the "town" were able to use the road and continue their life. From what I could gather the people there worked in trapping, as fishing guides, forestry laborers and mining prospectors. Most of these jobs you can leave where you live and live at the job site in a company provided trailer for the 2-4 month season, then return home to your shack and hunt, trap, fish, garden and pick berries all summer or winter. If they are tax paying citizens they probably collect unemployment all winter and have checks sent to the post office, which they may go to once a month or two.

It definitely was a remote town though, the locals in the next biggest town over (500 people) were afraid of the people that lived in the 30 person settlement and said that one winter the residents were stuck in the town and resorted to cannibalism.

I think to these experiences and I think there must be similar types of settlements throughout Siberian Russia. Society would collapse and these people really wouldn't be affected that much.
 

Dr. Howard

Peacock
Gold Member
In the past week I drove about 26 hours all over northern Alberta and through BC, I went from Fort McMurray>Cold Lake>Edmonton>Kamloops>Prince George>Dawson Creek and besides the cities, the entire region is pretty empty except for small towns. I passed by a ton of farms, ranches, mines and pulp/lumber mills some of these areas are really nice too especially from Hinton into Jasper and west of the Rockies around McBride and Valemount. Cache Creek and Clinton are both nice little towns that aren’t too remote and the Pine Pass area around Chetwynd is great for hunting/fishing and other outdoor activities year round.

Basically all of these areas are nice places to live, pretty much all white and have decent economies based on forestry/mining/oil/gas. i spent about three months working in Chetwynd last year on natural gas pipelines and it’s busy again this year with the Coastal Gas pipeline construction that will carry gas from Fort St John to Kitimat, it’s the one that they were protesting all over the country earlier this year.

Any guy who wants to work could easily move to a city/town like Fort McMurray, Grande Prairie, Dawson Creek, Prince George or Kamloops and be able to find a decent paying job and live a nice lifestyle, especially if you like the “all Canadian” type of lifestyle so hockey, hunting, fishing, boating, hiking, skiing, quadding, etc.
Or even retire. I don't know if it happens still but in the early 2000s a number of northern ontario towns that used to have mines or paper mills in them advertised themselves as retirement communities with dirt cheap housing. That is still the case in some towns, but I don't think they advertise anymore. Two such towns I can think of are Marathon and Red Rock Ontario. They are former paper mill sites on beautiful sheltered bays on lake superior where housing can be had for a song. It would be interesting to move there if someone was remote/internet based for their work and they could retire early and probably make themselves mayor.
 

scotian

Crow
Gold Member
Or even retire. I don't know if it happens still but in the early 2000s a number of northern ontario towns that used to have mines or paper mills in them advertised themselves as retirement communities with dirt cheap housing. That is still the case in some towns, but I don't think they advertise anymore. Two such towns I can think of are Marathon and Red Rock Ontario. They are former paper mill sites on beautiful sheltered bays on lake superior where housing can be had for a song. It would be interesting to move there if someone was remote/internet based for their work and they could retire early and probably make themselves mayor.
I know that some areas of the east coast were marketing themselves to Upper Canadians as cheap places to relocate and quit the rat race, popular finance blogger and former federal Liberal politician Garth Turner relocated to Lunenburg, a UNESCO heritage site:https://www.google.ca/amp/s/www.greaterfool.ca/2019/07/30/why/amp/


7A469DC9-E14D-4E13-8441-53AD063F0E8E.jpeg
He actually bought an old BMO bank and pimped it out: https://www.google.ca/amp/s/www.cbc.ca/amp/1.4676815

Cape Breton did a campaign to entice Americans to move there when Trump was elected in 2016, apparently they’re at it again haha:http://cbiftrumpwins.com/#intro

There’s some nice spots in the Maritimes, small towns of 5-20,000 people, very slow and peaceful, the type of place where you don’t have to lock your doors. I can see people relocating there from Ontario with the rise of working from home, who wouldn’t want to live in a Victorian era home on the ocean for less than half the price of a small condo in Toronto?
 

Attachments

NoMoreTO

Pelican
Friends of mine were just recently talking about cheap real estate in Canada, away from the BS. Nova Scotia was top of the list.
 

Dr. Howard

Peacock
Gold Member
Friends of mine were just recently talking about cheap real estate in Canada, away from the BS. Nova Scotia was top of the list.
I've already marked down some places in Northern Ontario for myself if I run out of steam in America. I could move back to the small town I was raised in for $60,000 CDN. Luckily I don't think it will become a tourist town, my uncle owns the modest house my grandparents lived in, on lake ontario towards kingston. It floods with tourists all summer now that its not even fun to visit.
 

hedonist

Woodpecker
Friends of mine were just recently talking about cheap real estate in Canada, away from the BS. Nova Scotia was top of the list.
I work with loads of people from NS/NL....I know they love the big trucks and the ski-doos but if make good coin that is a great place for early retirement and to get away from the BS.
 
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