The cashless society thread

Putin Closes

Kingfisher
Gold Member
RE: Sweden to go 100% cashless making it ILLEGAL to own physical money

Wow when I was in Sweden use to be barely 7:1 now its all the way up to 9:1, could this be the beginning of a SEK Selloff?
 

262

 
RE: Sweden to go 100% cashless making it ILLEGAL to own physical money

This year I went to Copenhagen, Malmo, and Stockholm, partially to check out the different forum takes on it. I've posted about it in the Travel forum.

Even walked around Rosengard during the day.

Unfortunately, I must report that I didn't see any burning cars or the like. A rather plain experience, actually.

It was also quite convenient to be able to pay for most things by credit, like I can here in Poland. Germany, on the other hand, with an unusual amount of places not taking credit, seemed ironically annoying and backward.

Just my boots on the ground.
 

anthony

Pelican
RE: Sweden to go 100% cashless making it ILLEGAL to own physical money

Vicious said:
DamienCasanova said:
No it's pretty real, India banned large cash bills about 2 weeks ago, and their entire country is about to rip itself apart.

What does India have to do with the topic at hand?

Definition of trend:

https://en.oxforddictionaries.com/definition/trend

Personally I think its a noun def #2:

A fashion:
‘the latest trends in modern dance’

Just trying to help.
 

JWLZG

 
RE: Sweden to go 100% cashless making it ILLEGAL to own physical money

262 said:
This year I went to Copenhagen, Malmo, and Stockholm, partially to check out the different forum takes on it. I've posted about it in the Travel forum.

Even walked around Rosengard during the day.

Unfortunately, I must report that I didn't see any burning cars or the like. A rather plain experience, actually.

It was also quite convenient to be able to pay for most things by credit, like I can here in Poland. Germany, on the other hand, with an unusual amount of places not taking credit, seemed ironically annoying and backward.

Just my boots on the ground.

I did a circuit of Scandinavia myself, and can chime in with my boots on the ground, and I'm sorry that my experience doesn't fit in with the (far) alt-right narrative, but I'd rather tell it is it is, narmsayin'?

In Stockholm, my CS host took me throughout the city by bike, we hung around Södermalm and Gamla Stan. I saw barely any brown people in the cities, let alone in the countryside, Båstad, and Uppsala, where I spent time. Sure, there were a fair share of Middle Eastern folk on the trains, I won't lie.

Hardly the lawless Götterdämmerung that many in the EE forum love to polemicise. No repetition of the sack of Rome, or the Battle of Berlin, 1945. Didn't see a single burning car in Malmö or elsewhere, let alone the masturbatory image of Muzzies sowing a trail of death and destruction egged on by fat Marxist feminists.

Practically as peaceful as lily-white EE, it made my experience almost dull.

In Finland, the only other brown person I saw was an Australian of South Asian background, who was with his white Aussie friend. We all chatted about gaming the local birds.

On the contrary, in supposedly conservative, red pill Spain, I'd endured being hassled by Pakistani peddlars every few hundred metres, along with 2 attempted muggings by North Africans who'd had the gall to abuse me racially beforehand.

But yeah, call me far too new-age, I too found it refreshing not to handle a single krone/kröna in Denmark and Sweden, but you would too, having had to eventually cycle through 10 or so different currencies over the next few months.
 

Samseau

Owl
Orthodox
Gold Member
RE: Sweden to go 100% cashless making it ILLEGAL to own physical money

JWLZG said:
262 said:
This year I went to Copenhagen, Malmo, and Stockholm, partially to check out the different forum takes on it. I've posted about it in the Travel forum.

Even walked around Rosengard during the day.

Unfortunately, I must report that I didn't see any burning cars or the like. A rather plain experience, actually.

It was also quite convenient to be able to pay for most things by credit, like I can here in Poland. Germany, on the other hand, with an unusual amount of places not taking credit, seemed ironically annoying and backward.

Just my boots on the ground.

I did a circuit of Scandinavia myself, and can chime in with my boots on the ground, and I'm sorry that my experience doesn't fit in with the (far) alt-right narrative, but I'd rather tell it is it is, narmsayin'?

In Stockholm, my CS host took me throughout the city by bike, we hung around Södermalm and Gamla Stan. I saw barely any brown people in the cities, let alone in the countryside, Båstad, and Uppsala, where I spent time. Sure, there were a fair share of Middle Eastern folk on the trains, I won't lie.

Hardly the lawless Götterdämmerung that many in the EE forum love to polemicise. No repetition of the sack of Rome, or the Battle of Berlin, 1945. Didn't see a single burning car in Malmö or elsewhere, let alone the masturbatory image of Muzzies sowing a trail of death and destruction egged on by fat Marxist feminists.

Practically as peaceful as lily-white EE, it made my experience almost dull.

In Finland, the only other brown person I saw was an Australian of South Asian background, who was with his white Aussie friend. We all chatted about gaming the local birds.

On the contrary, in supposedly conservative, red pill Spain, I'd endured being hassled by Pakistani peddlars every few hundred metres, along with 2 attempted muggings by North Africans who'd had the gall to abuse me racially beforehand.

But yeah, call me far too new-age, I too found it refreshing not to handle a single krone/kröna in Denmark and Sweden, but you would too, having had to eventually cycle through 10 or so different currencies over the next few months.

So you guys went to the White parts of the country and failed to experience enrichment. Cool story bro.

Also 262 walking around Rosengard as a male is nothing. Males rarely have to worry about anything, Muzzies aren't going to pick on strong targets.

If you fellas have noticed 100% of the horror stories involve women and children.
 

HighSpeed_LowDrag

Ostrich
Gold Member
RE: Sweden to go 100% cashless making it ILLEGAL to own physical money

It almost seems like Sweden is some sort of globalist testing-ground.

First feminism.
Then mass immigration.
And now this.
 

262

 
RE: Sweden to go 100% cashless making it ILLEGAL to own physical money

Samseau said:
So you guys went to the White parts of the country and failed to experience enrichment. Cool story bro.

Also 262 walking around Rosengard as a male is nothing. Males rarely have to worry about anything, Muzzies aren't going to pick on strong targets.

If you fellas have noticed 100% of the horror stories involve women and children.

Just reporting what I saw first-hand. That includes no observations of horror stories on women or children - save for the appearance of said women! (Kidding, actually. My post in the Travel forum is more nuanced.)

I obviously can't claim my story is any more valid than any other story, except to myself. And I obviously know I couldn't have observed every angle. I'm not a woman or a child, for instance, as far as guys here who've met me can confirm.

On that note, if folks want to confirm ideas for themselves, they should do the same. Observe them as first-hand as reasonably possible -

Kinda like with Game ideas and girls.
 

Mercenary

Hummingbird
RE: Sweden to go 100% cashless making it ILLEGAL to own physical money

JWLZG said:
In Finland, the only other brown person I saw was an Australian of South Asian background, who was with his white Aussie friend. We all chatted about gaming the local birds.

Not sure which Finland you visited, but when I went to Helsinki I saw black and brown faces everywhere.
 

amity

Pelican
Gold Member
RE: Sweden to go 100% cashless making it ILLEGAL to own physical money

The thing is, it's possible, even in cities who have taken on plenty of enrichment like Berlin, to spend a few days there and see a relatively small amount of non Europeans
I was in mostly tourist parts and the only place I was in with noticeably high percentage of non natives was Neukoeln, but even there, I spotted precious few of the more recent migrants except around some of the train or tube stops, but even there, numbers were pretty small
They are concentrated in certain places, not distributed equally
They're rarely to be seen in tourist parts or business districts and so it's quite possible to form a somewhat unrealistic opinion of things and think "there's almost no migrants here in <insert particular part of city> so that means there's no problem!"
This logical fallacy is what lulls some people, particularly leftists into thinking that we are scaremongering or exaggerating the situation
 

void

Pelican
RE: Sweden to go 100% cashless making it ILLEGAL to own physical money

How do you deal with drugs, if there is no cash anymore? Can we expect an explosion of bitcoin values?
 

DamienCasanova

Ostrich
Gold Member
RE: Sweden to go 100% cashless making it ILLEGAL to own physical money

void said:
How do you deal with drugs, if there is no cash anymore? Can we expect an explosion of bitcoin values?

Bitcoins will be next on the chopping block. There are already stories of govts demanding bitcoin exchanges turn over their user information, like recently with coinbase. Only approved digital currencies, aka, govt subsidized electronic banking only.

Banning cash will create an even more robust black market and bring back a barter economy and an underground precious metals market like what is currently taking place in India. I'd expect a lot of drugs for sex being traded, and other services as well.
 

Valentine

Kingfisher
Gold Member
RE: Sweden to go 100% cashless making it ILLEGAL to own physical money

DamienCasanova said:
void said:
How do you deal with drugs, if there is no cash anymore? Can we expect an explosion of bitcoin values?

Bitcoins will be next on the chopping block. There are already stories of govts demanding bitcoin exchanges turn over their user information, like recently with coinbase. Only approved digital currencies, aka, govt subsidized electronic banking only.

Bitcoin<>Fiat exchanges will likely all eventually require turning over user info for taxes, but peer-to-peer exchanges are much more difficult to regulate and it also seems financial institutions are embracing cryptocurrency e.g. Santander bank are launching a blockchain token.
 

kosko

Peacock
Gold Member
RE: Sweden to go 100% cashless making it ILLEGAL to own physical money

monster said:
They're doing this so they can tax every transaction.

This.

Govt in the West are running on fumes and have little means to just borrow mountains of debt to fill holes. They are back to raising revenues from shaking down the public. Keeping everything digital makes it easier to track and to tax.
 

Leonard D Neubache

Owl
Gold Member
RE: Sweden to go 100% cashless making it ILLEGAL to own physical money

DamienCasanova said:
void said:
How do you deal with drugs, if there is no cash anymore? Can we expect an explosion of bitcoin values?

Bitcoins will be next on the chopping block. There are already stories of govts demanding bitcoin exchanges turn over their user information, like recently with coinbase. Only approved digital currencies, aka, govt subsidized electronic banking only.

Banning cash will create an even more robust black market and bring back a barter economy and an underground precious metals market like what is currently taking place in India. I'd expect a lot of drugs for sex being traded, and other services as well.

This is how we see most federal governments scrambling to keep up with an ever evolving underground. When the currency disappears then you will simply have people trading by other means. Currency can be anything small and portable with a good, recognised value per unit and a long shelf life absent diminution in value. You could fairly easily use branded alcohol as currency for minor transactions as long as you were careful with the transportation and storage. In that instance the government would catch on after the various reports filtered up to the idiots in charge, and by the end of the year you would see limits on transactions at bottle shops and/or I.D. logging for sales above $X whereafter people would start buying less but more frequently like they do with ammunition here in Australia. Regular people will get shitty with the government as a side effect. Meanwhile our nations will more and more begin to resemble the old soviet union, with the government strangling all free enterprise, impoverishing the citizenry and blaming it all on criminals and dissidents.

edit: Where things will get really interesting is when the rubber hits the road re: seriously large scale transactions as per those carried out by cartels and the like. We might even see some crazy shit like cartels minting their own branded precious metal currency on which their reputation is staked. That would be the most amazing inversion of responsible currency issuance in the history of mankind.
 

DamienCasanova

Ostrich
Gold Member
RE: Sweden to go 100% cashless making it ILLEGAL to own physical money

Exactly, that's one of the reasons why Libya was targeted for destruction, because Qaddafi was going to mint his own Gold backed currency. ISIS has already minted their own Gold and silver coins as well, so I could definitely see more cartels and terrorist orgs follow suit. Gold was actually just approved to be used as currency and investments in accordance with Sharia Law, by whatever Muslim scholars decide those things. So I expect Gold/Silver trading to increase quite a lot in Asia and the Middle East in the next few years, as well as the anywhere else that tries to eliminate cash and implement digital currency.

Gold & Silver are actually pretty cheap right now, particularly Silver is undervalued I believe @ around $17/oz. Gold @ $1166/oz isn't too bad either, considering it was over $1360 very recently and could easily get right back there again soon. Black Market gold in India is trading for around $100 over market value supposedly as well. $1100 has been a solid floor for Gold for a couple years now. If any more countries like India decide to ban cash it will definitely spike.

I think I'm going to buy myself some more metal for Christmas.
 

kosko

Peacock
Gold Member
RE: Sweden to go 100% cashless making it ILLEGAL to own physical money

Gold has stood the test of time, but its flaw has always been its practicality.

When scaling up the best instrument to park your wealth is land.
 

Samseau

Owl
Orthodox
Gold Member
RE: Sweden to go 100% cashless making it ILLEGAL to own physical money

Banning cash also makes it really easy to inflate the currency without worrying about shortages. No need to worry about keeping track of lots of bills. Just add zeros to the government balance sheet and scale welfare alongside with it.

Of course, the suppliers will be ruined because they will be receiving worthless electronic credits that lose value by the second, but that never stopped a government from creating money to maintain power.
 

Paracelsus

Crow
Gold Member
RE: Sweden to go 100% cashless making it ILLEGAL to own physical money

Leonard D Neubache said:
When the currency disappears then you will simply have people trading by other means. Currency can be anything small and portable with a good, recognised value per unit and a long shelf life absent diminution in value. You could fairly easily use branded alcohol as currency for minor transactions as long as you were careful with the transportation and storage. In that instance the government would catch on after the various reports filtered up to the idiots in charge, and by the end of the year you would see limits on transactions at bottle shops and/or I.D. logging for sales above $X whereafter people would start buying less but more frequently like they do with ammunition here in Australia. Regular people will get shitty with the government as a side effect. Meanwhile our nations will more and more begin to resemble the old soviet union, with the government strangling all free enterprise, impoverishing the citizenry and blaming it all on criminals and dissidents.

John T. Reed also recommends as insurance against hyperinflation a stockpile of small consumer goods that are essential or highly desirable and which don't require much room for storage. Having big consumer goods is stupid: generally the black market doesn't exactly give you change, so thinking you can cruise through hyperinflation with that Rolex or a Ferrari is wrong-headed. You could be forced to give them away for two bags of potatoes.

Alcohol is one idea: I'd say cigarettes would be even better because they're legal to own while also being addictive and therefore desirable, you don't have to keep them at a certain temperature, and you get a lot of density of product in a small space; after all, prison economies are built on it. Toilet paper is an idea, although by the time it hits you'll be able to use fiat money for that purpose, but tampons are another as well.

Gold's main advantage is the density of value you can achieve: you don't need a lot of it to hold considerable value. Its disadvantage in hyperinflation is similar to the Rolex issue above: you can't get change, and because fake gold will get whipped around at great speed when hyperinflation hits, people will start demanding that you assay the gold you provide as tender.

Old silver or nickel coinage might not be as compact as gold, but it has a certain inbuilt stop-loss until hyperinflation hits because you can always redeem it for the face value of the coin if the arse drops out of the silver or nickel markets.
 

DamienCasanova

Ostrich
Gold Member
RE: Sweden to go 100% cashless making it ILLEGAL to own physical money

Paracelsus said:
Leonard D Neubache said:
When the currency disappears then you will simply have people trading by other means. Currency can be anything small and portable with a good, recognised value per unit and a long shelf life absent diminution in value. You could fairly easily use branded alcohol as currency for minor transactions as long as you were careful with the transportation and storage. In that instance the government would catch on after the various reports filtered up to the idiots in charge, and by the end of the year you would see limits on transactions at bottle shops and/or I.D. logging for sales above $X whereafter people would start buying less but more frequently like they do with ammunition here in Australia. Regular people will get shitty with the government as a side effect. Meanwhile our nations will more and more begin to resemble the old soviet union, with the government strangling all free enterprise, impoverishing the citizenry and blaming it all on criminals and dissidents.

John T. Reed also recommends as insurance against hyperinflation a stockpile of small consumer goods that are essential or highly desirable and which don't require much room for storage. Having big consumer goods is stupid: generally the black market doesn't exactly give you change, so thinking you can cruise through hyperinflation with that Rolex or a Ferrari is wrong-headed. You could be forced to give them away for two bags of potatoes.

Alcohol is one idea: I'd say cigarettes would be even better because they're legal to own while also being addictive and therefore desirable, you don't have to keep them at a certain temperature, and you get a lot of density of product in a small space; after all, prison economies are built on it. Toilet paper is an idea, although by the time it hits you'll be able to use fiat money for that purpose, but tampons are another as well.

Gold's main advantage is the density of value you can achieve: you don't need a lot of it to hold considerable value. Its disadvantage in hyperinflation is similar to the Rolex issue above: you can't get change, and because fake gold will get whipped around at great speed when hyperinflation hits, people will start demanding that you assay the gold you provide as tender.

Old silver or nickel coinage might not be as compact as gold, but it has a certain inbuilt stop-loss until hyperinflation hits because you can always redeem it for the face value of the coin if the arse drops out of the silver or nickel markets.

Hi-Ho Silver! I love that you mention density of value, that's a very important concept. Just read a great article on that subject today

Which Of These Would You Rather Have In Your Safe?

http://www.zerohedge.com/news/2016-12-08/which-these-would-you-rather-have-your-safe

So let’s look at all of these assets in order of least to most value dense:

Value of assets in dollars per cubic centimeters:

Ammunition: $0.037
Fine wine: $3.15
1-kg Silver bar: $5.11
$100 bills: $88.55
Rare comic book: $110.14
500-euro notes: $373.05
1-kg Gold bar: $1,278.75
Luxury watch: $2,013
1,000 Swiss franc: $827.14
Colored diamonds: $818,977.53
 
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