The Coffee Thread

slubu

Ostrich
Gold Member
Roosh said:
-What is your coffee routine like?
-What cafes and/or countries have the best quality?
-What beans do you prefer?
-How do you usually drink coffee?
-What method of brewing do you prefer?

- Every morning when I wake up, drink a cup of coffee I make at home.
- Costa Rica has blown everything else out of the water for me. Frankly the coffee there was just unbelievable how delicious it was
- Dark roast. One local place here in NYC has a dark roast bean called "French Costa Rican" and I always get those beans.
- Black.
- Get the above beans, they grind them for a french press (I tell them that). I boil water, put 2 TBSP in my french press, pour about 12oz of water in, stir with a spoon and let sit for 2 minutes exactly before pushing down the press and pouring.

I actually went on a coffee tour in costa rica and it was very educational. The tour guide said french press is a great way to go, people just leave it in there too long so it gets bitter. He said two minutes max and since I've actually started timing it I would say the coffee is almost twice as good now.

Nascimento said:
I noticed you can tell the difference between a good and bad coffee by drinking it black, as opposed to loading it with cream and sugar.

So simple, yet so many have the faintest clue.

Agreed. Once you get used to black you will not want milk or sugar anymore. The problem is that most chain places have shit coffee which is horrendous without the milk and sugar.

Another indicator of good coffee is if you let it go cold, how it tastes. The one I make at home is perfectly drinkable at room temperature.

I'm not a big fan of Americanos but sometimes it is hard to find drip/french press abroad so that will have to do. That guide Roosh posted is very helpful, always wondered what the hell all these different variations were.
 
slubu said:
Nascimento said:
I noticed you can tell the difference between a good and bad coffee by drinking it black, as opposed to loading it with cream and sugar.

So simple, yet so many have the faintest clue.

Agreed. Once you get used to black you will not want milk or sugar anymore. The problem is that most chain places have shit coffee which is horrendous without the milk and sugar.

Drink coffee like you drink whisky. With no junk in it.

You wouldn't mix the Macallan with Coke, nor would you mix espresso with Splenda.
 
Que enspastic said:
People at work think I'm elitist because I think Starbucks and Costa "isn't actually coffee".


To the non UK guys, Costa is our main coffee shop chain here and is cheaper and even worse than Starbucks.

If anyone is in London or visiting good places to get coffee include Fernandez and Wells, Konditor and Cook and Bar Italia in Soho.

I only drink espresso. I like my coffee like I like my booze, short and strong.

Que enspastic said:
t80XYZ6.jpg

Shit, I think I've had coffee there, is that Tottenham Court Road, the north end.? If I remember the coffee was good but overpriced.
 

Veloce

Crow
Gold Member
I don't drink coffee daily, but I would consider myself a connoisseur, and my current method is a little unconventional, to say the least.

I make cowboy coffee (heating water in a pot and pouring in the grounds to steep and later filter) but instead of water, I heat up milk. So instead of diluting coffee with milk, I steep the milk directly with the grounds. I do 2 Tablespoons per 8 ounces of milk. It comes out quite strong. I let the grounds steep in the hot milk for 30 seconds, and then strain through a very fine mesh strainer. I don't bother with a coffee filter, even though I used to use Chemex filters. I find the resulting brew is too weak. Chemex fanboys call it "clean", but to me it's missing something, and it's the volatile oils. After straining, I very often blend in some butter and/or coconut oil.

When I go to cafes, I almost always order a cappuccino, because I don't have an espresso machine or grinder at home. I can, however, make a better cappuccino than 99% of cafes, something I practiced at one of my chef gigs:

tumblr_nnsp688lYE1rkla7mo1_400.jpg


It's by no means a perfect rosette, but the ratio was spot on, and the texture and temperature of the milk is perfect. Steaming milk takes practice but once you get it you're good for life. Properly steamed milk should not be grainy or have large bubbles. It should be a fine textured foam with the texture of shaving cream and the viscosity of cold cream. It should be neither too hot nor lukewarm. I had a cappuccino recently from a place in Las Vegas where the barista supposedly won some competition. His cap foam was grainy and lukewarm.

The other problem with good vs. truly great coffee is the quality of product. Great coffee is expensive, and finding a place willing to sacrifice profits to serve a superior product is rare. There are a handful of such places in most major American cities.

Parisian coffee is uniformly awful with the exception of a few new spots that are taking after American coffee culture. American coffee gets a bad rap thanks to Starbucks, but we probably have some of the best coffee shops in the world if you know where to find them.

Italy is an interesting case. You can get a kickass cappuccino almost anywhere, but many old school spots still use Robusta beans. I was told by some locals that the espresso machine was invented to take shit quality beans and make them taste better by extracting more flavor due to the pressurized steam extraction process. This seems to fall in line with Italy's culinary tradition of taking cheap, humble ingredients and learning to make it taste good.

Down the line of future purchases is definitely a high quality grinder and espresso machine. I prefer espresso to coffee. I'd rather take a shot of concentrated flavor than nurse a mug. I would agree with you guys that the very highest quality coffee and espresso should not be adorned with milk or sugar, but finding places that serve this quality is rare, and I've only had it a few times. This was at Handsome Coffee Roasters, which has since been bought out by Blue Bottle. I find that Blue Bottle is very good, but not as good as Handsome was. L.A. Mill is also excellent, but expensive. Don't bother with any place serving L.A. Mill and just go straight to their cafe in Silverlake. Intelligensia is pretty good, but not what I'd consider great.

Edit: The NY guys can give better recs for coffee there than I can...I didn't hit up that many spots but I did go to The Queens Kickshaw in Astoria and the coffee was first rate.

Oh and one more other thing, what pisses me off more than anything about American coffee culture, even in many high end spots, is how long they pull the espresso. I guess they feel like Americans would feel gypped by getting a real Italian single shot. But the extra volume is just water which just dilutes the shot and overextracts the grounds, making it bitter.

This is what a proper shot of espresso should look like:
images


That is a thing of beauty right there. In Italy they drink shots like this throughout the day. You need a quick caffeine burst, drop into any deli or market, order an espresso, throw it back, and get on with your day. It's a great tradition and I would love to see it make its way here but don't see it happening.
 

Menace

Crow
Gold Member
I've recently started getting into coffee. I agree with many here that Starbucks is just shit, and that to really taste the difference in coffee's you need to drink it black. There's actually a couple of places here that do a great french press.

slubu, do you have a french press thing at home? If so, which do you have? I think I'd like to get one.

My one guilty pleasure is that I like hazelnut flavor in my coffee.
 

The_CEO

Pelican
Guys, read the reviews of the different coffee maker products before diving in.

The Aeropress and Melitta thing (like 3 bucks at some stores) get great reviews for the quality of the coffee they yield.

Some people like French Press (it doesn't filter as much) but a lot of studies show it jacks up your cholesterol - so that's a problem for you, beware.

Also, nuances such as the quality of your grinder, how fine you grind the coffee or not, and temperature of the water will effect your coffee.
The maker of Aeropress specifies an ideal water temp. for usage, for example.

@Scotian above, uses the Melitta thing and posted a video about other products in the same category.
 
The_CEO said:
Guys, read the reviews of the different coffee maker products before diving in.

The Aeropress and Melitta thing (like 3 bucks at some stores) get great reviews for the quality of the coffee they yield.

Some people like French Press (it doesn't filter as much) but a lot of studies show it jacks up your cholesterol - so that's a problem for you, beware.

Also, nuances such as the quality of your grinder, how fine you grind the coffee or not, and temperature of the water will effect your coffee.
The maker of Aeropress specifies an ideal water temp. for usage, for example.

@Scotian above, uses the Melitta thing and posted a video about other products in the same category.

Yea, the french press makes the tastiest cup of coffee. But you get a lot more of the oils.

I can't speak for cholesterol, but it makes me break out pretty badly so I have to refrain. :sad:
 

Altantis

Pigeon
I have a 10 year old Gaggia Classic machine which has seen better days, but that's less important than the following:

1) Fresh beans. No ifs or buts. Non-negotiable.

2) Decent grinder. It's better to spend more on a good grinder than good machine.

3) Good technique (obviously). Even after 10 years I'm still learning, including adjusting the grind to changes in humidity.

My cup of choice has gradually progressed from standard latte to machiatto or ristretto. Sometimes I make or buy a piccolo in the morning, which is somewhere between a machiatto and latte:

MBD_piccolo.jpg


I'm also lucky to have an excellent source of beans less than 5 minutes from home. My favourite beans are from Yemen (out of this world for complexity) Ethiopia and Sumatra, but most of the main regions have their unique qualities. This might sound pretentious, but after time a coffee snob develops a delicate palate in the same way as a wine connoisseur.

I also find it quite amusing that some local hipster baristas are increasingly becoming pseudo-celebrities, but I don't mind buying from them if they make a decent cup.
 

slubu

Ostrich
Gold Member
Menace said:
slubu, do you have a french press thing at home? If so, which do you have? I think I'd like to get one.

Yeah, I got this off Amazon for $40 or so about 1.5 years ago, use it almost daily. The best part is you can use it for tea leaves too, so I do that as well. I recall I did a bunch of research on French Presses and chose this one though now I can't tell you why that is. Works wonderfully however.
 

Meadowlark

Hummingbird
Gold Member
Nascimento said:
I noticed you can tell the difference between a good and bad coffee by drinking it black, as opposed to loading it with cream and sugar.

So simple, yet so many have the faintest clue.

Reading about Coffee here is what finally pushed me to drink mine without sugar, just some heavy whipping cream or even black sometimes.

Went camping this weekend, I had my morning coffee out of this heated over a wood fire:

162021.jpg
 

Nascimento

Ostrich
Gold Member
Shit. I added a couple teaspoons of powdered cocoa to sugarless coffee with a splash of milk.

I've been wired for the past hour. At one point my eyes felt like they were propped open to the max.

There's got to be some alertness-related effects to cocoa, especially when combined with coffee.

Anyone else tried it before?
 

el mechanico

Owl
Gold Member
Nascimento said:
Shit. I added a couple teaspoons of powdered cocoa to sugarless coffee with a splash of milk.

I've been wired for the past hour. At one point my eyes felt like they were propped open to the max.

There's got to be some alertness-related effects to cocoa, especially when combined with coffee.

Anyone else tried it before?
No but will ASAP
 

kerouac

Ostrich
Nascimento said:
Shit. I added a couple teaspoons of powdered cocoa to sugarless coffee with a splash of milk.

I've been wired for the past hour. At one point my eyes felt like they were propped open to the max.

There's got to be some alertness-related effects to cocoa, especially when combined with coffee.

Anyone else tried it before?

I'm in love with the cocoa.

LRfQj7T.gif



Ever since getting back into a low-carb diet, I've been all about heavy whipping cream, 100% cocoa powder, and coffee. Really jacks me up.

And as a neat effect, you can whip up some chocolate whipped cream by just doing a little whipping action on the cocoa+hwc. The heavy whipping cream whips up fast.
 

el mechanico

Owl
Gold Member
Will one of those coca trees grow in Florida? I watched those indiginous people walk all up and down mountains and give everyone a leave to chew. I would be ok with that in the morning mixed with coffee.
 

Veloce

Crow
Gold Member
el mechanico said:
Will one of those coca trees grow in Florida? I watched those indiginous people walk all up and down mountains and give everyone a leave to chew. I would be ok with that in the morning mixed with coffee.

Haha that's two different things. They were talking about cocoa, or more accurately, Theobroma cacao, which is where chocolate comes from:

Cacao-Pods-On-Tree.jpg


cacoa-ian-maguire-lg.jpg


images


chocolate240.jpg


Coca, or the Erythroxylaceae family, on the other hand, is what many locals in South America chew on for any number of medicinal reasons, and also gets turned into cocaine.

Close%20up%20coca%20leaves%20and%20seeds.jpg


Cocaine-Addiction-Treatment.jpg


polls_cokehead_5739_454660_answer_3_xlarge.jpeg
 

Veloce

Crow
Gold Member
FrenchCanadian said:
Nascimento said:
Do you guys add anything besides cream, milk, sugar to your coffee?

I've heard cocoa powder mixed in works well.

I prefer Honey or Maple Syrup as opposed to refined sugar.

When I make bulletproof coffee at home I sweeten it with maple syrup and it's awesome.
 
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