The Coffee Thread

getdownonit

Kingfisher
Gold Member
^ Supposedly the coca plant doesn't produce the same quality or substances in its leaves unless it's grown at a high altitude. This is one reason it's usually grown in the mountains of Peru, Bolivia, Colombia, etc.

As far as coffee goes, I usually go for a black espresso, with a limited amount of brown sugar mixed in if necessary. Lately I've been experimenting with cortados, which have recently begun to proliferate here in the US. They're well balanced, no sugar needed, but can be hit or miss depending on the quality of the milk and espresso - more variables involved than a straight espresso pull. The best cortados I've had are 1:1 espresso to steamed milk with a hint of foam. Often coffeeshops will do a 1:2 which ends up being too much milk for my taste, or use a single lungo pull of espresso which turns out too watery as opposed to a double ristretto or 2 standard shots.

For my money there's no better coffee in NYC than Caffe Vita, which has a couple West Coast outposts as well. It's the size of a broom closet but they roast their beans in the store and always make a superb drink.

Cold brew is a good choice during warmer weather, but it takes a damn long time to make at home.

I approve of the French press though I don't own one myself. I may take a flyer on the one above, Veloce.
 

Designate

Woodpecker
Gold Member
Nascimento said:
Do you guys add anything besides cream, milk, sugar to your coffee?

I've heard cocoa powder mixed in works well.

Recently I had what I assume to be a Westernized version of Turkish coffee at a Middle Eastern restaurant. (Never traveled to Turkey or the Middle East). It was served similar to this, but with cardamom too. I enjoyed it and have attempted to recreate it on my own a few times.

But I think the key is to drink good coffee black for a more pleasurable taste and a longer smoother buzz. Just an overall better experience. Adding sugar will fuck with your caffeine buzz and cause you to crash sooner. Dressing it up and masking the taste of shit coffee is perfectly reasonable, but it is shameful to do so when you are drinking gourmet.

Traveling to Haiti a few years ago forever changed my coffee experience by having a fresh source nearby. Even common brands you could buy at the markets like this and this are leagues above what you buy at the grocery store here in the U.S. I am sure those of you who have been to other coffee producing countries can say the same.
 

xxMarco

Robin
I usually grind my coffee at home and use a french press. Thing is I don't know where to get good coffee beans. I usually just buy off the shelf at the grocery store and sometimes at Wal-Mart.

Where do you guys get your fresh beans or is it better to just go to a local coffee shop and purchase coffee that they make on the spot?
 

The_CEO

Pelican
For me this is a key point about the Aeropress:

"...the Aeropress has a shorter brew time (30-90 seconds) and typically uses a paper filter, you won't find some of the harsher oils and chemicals in an Aeropress coffee that you'd get from a French Press. "

Also, for the traveling man, the Aeropress is packable and portable.
If your hotel or apt. doesn't have a coffee pot, all you need is hot water and your good to go.

The advantage of the French press is larger capacity. I used to use them and don't like them anymore. They are good for make loose leaf green tea though.
 

kerouac

Ostrich
I bought an Aeropress in 2006 and tried it a few times before giving up on it. The espresso never came out hot enough for my liking.

For me, coffee/tea has to be either really cold or really hot. I'm not into luke-warm.

:catlady:
 

Eusebius

Hummingbird
Gold Member
kerouac said:
I bought an Aeropress in 2006 and tried it a few times before giving up on it. The espresso never came out hot enough for my liking.

For me, coffee/tea has to be either really cold or really hot. I'm not into luke-warm.

:catlady:

True, the Aeropress can't really make an espresso. But then, neither can a French press. You need a quality espresso machine, no substitutes.

One tip: pre-warm your coffee mug with hot water before making coffee with the Aeropress. Especially on cold mornings.
 

The_CEO

Pelican
I am confused as to why the Aeropress would be luke warm?
The inventor (an Engineer and Stanford professor) says he's done tests and if I recall correctly recommends 185 degree water (it might be a bit less than this) for optimum results.

Also... it's not marketed as true espresso. It produces a concentrated coffee and then you can add more hot water like an Americano.

For travel purposes, the Melitta is also good, and the coffee it makes gets good reviews.
It seems like for single cup coffee this product and the Aeropress got the best reviews.
 

kerouac

Ostrich
The_CEO said:
I am confused as to why the Aeropress would be luke warm?
The inventor (an Engineer and Stanford professor) says he's done tests and if I recall correctly recommends 185 degree water (it might be a bit less than this) for optimum results.

That's still 10-20 deg F less than an espresso shot. Also, I tried it back when it was marketed on a lot of espresso making websites (almost 10 years ago) so I'm not exactly sure whether they've changed the marketing strategy since then.

On another site I read "Aeropress recommends low temperature brewing with 165 to 175 f water. They say "professional coffee tasters" preferred low temperatures"
 

The_CEO

Pelican
^^^^
I was wrong then re: 185.
What you said is what I must've read.

Basically I am anti-French Press. It's an elegant looking device and the simplicity is appealing.
But I don't think it makes good coffee, unless you like cholesterol-elevating, chemical-laden coffee.
 

Dallas Winston

Ostrich
Gold Member
I love coffee but because of digestive issues, I've had to search for ones that my body can accept.

For anyone with acid reflux or sensitive stomachs that may have steered clear of coffee in the past, there's a great one I get off Amazon.

Rich Rewards acid free coffee. No heartburn. Decent taste. And seems to have the same amount of caffeine as any other cup of Joe:

http://www.amazon.com/Rewards-Break...430936866&sr=8-1&keywords=rich+rewards+coffee
 

Veloce

Crow
Gold Member
^^^ That's moka, not espresso, but the Brits have a funny way with renaming things. Espresso is hot water forced under pressure through tightly compacted ground beans. The extra dissolved solids and oils are what give espresso its viscosity.
 

Veloce

Crow
Gold Member
Just watched that Moka vid again.

There's something about her prissy, Brit-educated voice that makes me want to blast my cappuccino foam down her throat.

Edit:

Now here's something interesting. Bialetti has a maker called the Brikka that allows pressure to build up before passing through the grounds, recreating an espresso machine effect:


Still not at the level of an espresso maker (and no steaming wand) but for $45 it could be worth a shot. I'll pick one up and report back.
 

Mike5055

Kingfisher
I always heat my water in my electric kettle first and finish it in the moka pot. I find when I heat the water from cold in my moka pot, it gets a metallic taste.
 
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