The Coffee Thread

`Petronius

Pigeon
I like the non branded bulletproof coffee because of the slow release of caffeine/breakfast replacement, but I wish people would be less damn likely to peddle pseudoscience. Not you guys, just the video.
 

MOVSM

Pelican
Gold Member
A classic: simple, easy, minimum investment, tested by time--Turkish coffee.
Or Armenian if you live there. Or Greek. Or Serbian. Or Lebanese.

20170129_100310_zpsjnxwh9zy.jpg
 

bootyhuntah

Woodpecker
Gold Member
Another thing you guys can do if you feel like you want to save money and have the time and tend towards coffee nerdery is to roast your own. This is something I've been getting into the last few months and it's working out pretty great. You will need a couple things before you do this though.

You can pick up a cheap popcorn air popper online like this one here: https://www.amazon.com/West-Bend-82416-Crazy-Popper/dp/B0036WS1GY. It's important to find a popper with the air vents coming in from the side of the roasting chamber as opposed to the bottom.

You can also pick up green beans here: https://www.sweetmarias.com/. It works out to being much cheaper than buying retail from a local roaster, and the results are actually quite good and can be semi-consistent after some practice. My favorite green beans from that site are maybe the Guatemala Pulcal Inteligente or the Ethiopia Kaffa Michiti beans.

This setup will allow you to roast somewhere around 80-110g of green coffee per batch, which will get you around 4 or so cups of brewed coffee. You lose a bit of weight after roasting due to moisture loss. Each roast takes around 6-8 minutes. After roasting, it is customary to let the beans sit in a bag or container with a one way valve (to let gas escape out, not in) for 12-24 hrs before brewing.

Whats great about this is that you always have fresh roasted coffee around for drinking. What's not so great is that you need to do this outside or in a garage as the chaff of the beans flies all over the place, and the roasting process does produce a bit of smoke. Pretty damn tasty smoke though. And it will make your musty garage smell fucking great after a few roasting sessions...
 

Grenblin

Sparrow
Gold Member
bootyhuntah said:
Another thing you guys can do if you feel like you want to save money and have the time and tend towards coffee nerdery is to roast your own. This is something I've been getting into the last few months and it's working out pretty great. You will need a couple things before you do this though.

You can pick up a cheap popcorn air popper online like this one here: https://www.amazon.com/West-Bend-82416-Crazy-Popper/dp/B0036WS1GY. It's important to find a popper with the air vents coming in from the side of the roasting chamber as opposed to the bottom.

You can also pick up green beans here: https://www.sweetmarias.com/. It works out to being much cheaper than buying retail from a local roaster, and the results are actually quite good and can be semi-consistent after some practice. My favorite green beans from that site are maybe the Guatemala Pulcal Inteligente or the Ethiopia Kaffa Michiti beans.

This setup will allow you to roast somewhere around 80-110g of green coffee per batch, which will get you around 4 or so cups of brewed coffee. You lose a bit of weight after roasting due to moisture loss. Each roast takes around 6-8 minutes. After roasting, it is customary to let the beans sit in a bag or container with a one way valve (to let gas escape out, not in) for 12-24 hrs before brewing.

Whats great about this is that you always have fresh roasted coffee around for drinking. What's not so great is that you need to do this outside or in a garage as the chaff of the beans flies all over the place, and the roasting process does produce a bit of smoke. Pretty damn tasty smoke though. And it will make your musty garage smell fucking great after a few roasting sessions...

This!
I roast coffee every Sunday, it's a part of my Sunday home chores routine.
$17 Air popcorn popper from Walmart
Green coffee beans from Sweet Marias
A good burr grinder
French Press
Sometimes I also drop about 10 crushed cardamom seeds into the grinds to brew with the coffee, makes the coffee taste like home (I grew up in the Mediterranean region).

Needless to say that I've become a coffee snob, Starbucks and Keurig coffee make me think of sewage.
 

stugatz

Pelican
I percolate my coffee - stovetop - on the weekdays. I initially bought it because I had no room for an automatic drip. I also wanted a coffeemaker that was going to last me longer than a plastic autodrip, and a stainless steel percolator is likely going to be around when I'm 70 if I maintain it just right.

The coffee isn't well reviewed, as it's overextracted and you're practically boiling your coffee. I'd say, yeah it's a little harsh - but if you use filtered water, clean your pot every couple of weeks, and buy very cheap whole beans like Hills Brothers, you get the best of all worlds (and the overextracted coffee muddles the bad taste of Hills Brothers). I grind my beans coarse for this - I've heard drip ground with a filter works OK, but I don't like spending money on filters.

Since last year, that's been it. I'm likely getting a French Press soon, and am going to hand-grind beans for that.
 

stugatz

Pelican
Also, I'm wondering about moka pots. Do they really have a habit of, well, exploding if they're not maintained properly? I've read some horror stories and I'd rather not have a pipe bomb in my kitchen.
 

Tengen

Kingfisher
Gold Member
Not an expert, but I have a few preferences with coffee.

Other than using the coffee machine at work for double espressos, I have the following choices at home:

a) Aeropress - described enough by Roosh, though I first came across it in 4-Hour Chef
b) Moka Pot - I got this on my birthday from my girl, searched YouTube for instructions on how to use it and found this useful:
c) Cold-brew - this is my preferred method for three reasons:
  • I can make it in batches
  • Ice-cold coffee is delicious
  • Cold-brew extracts less of the harsh/bitter compounds

The following is how I usually do it, and yields about 1.5L of coffee.

Prep:
200g medium-grind coffee
Cold water - I like to boil tap water, leave it overnight in the fridge.
Pyrex measuring jug
Fine-mesh conical sieve
Paper coffee filter - the brand I buy comes in a pack of 40 at the supermarket
2-litre tall plastic container, tupperware style
Empty bottles or mason jars for storing. I personally keep my old whisky bottles once I've gone through them.

Process:
1/ Dump the 200g ground coffee into the 2-litre container
2/ Add the cold water. Use a spoon to stir it to make sure the grounds are evenly soaked
3/ Seal the container and leave overnight in the fridge. I aim for 12-24 hours.
4/ Take the container out of the fridge.
5/ Go through a first filtration with the fine-mesh sieve into the Pyrex jug. This will quickly filter out the larger particles.

Here, all the coffee should be in the Pyrex jug, roughly filtered to keep out the larger particles. The coffee will still be a little cloudy at this stage due to the smaller particles.

6/ Rinse out the plastic container and sieve.
7/ Place a paper filter into the sieve, which goes over the plastic container.
8/ You will now pour the coffee from the Pyrex into the paper filter. This will be a staggered process as it will take time for the coffee to drip through. You may have to replace the paper filter at least once. I suggest reading a book while you wait for the coffee to drip completely through the filter. Check on it once every 10-20 minutes
9/ Once all the coffee has gone through the paper filter, pour it into your bottles/mason jars and put them in the fridge. Enjoy at will.

BONUS: Make some simple sugar syrup. Because the coffee is cold you will have a hard time stirring sugar into it for that sweet touch. I learned this from my bartending colleagues, who make this for use in cocktails.

1/ Heat 200g sugar and 200ml water in a pan until completely dissolved. Cool and pour in small mason jar.

That's it. I love being able to wake up in the morning, take out my whisky bottle and pour myself an ice-cold coffee. Sweeten it with a drop of sugarr syrup, maybe an ice cube to keep it chilled, and I'm ready for anything else that comes.

Afterwards I'll come home and pop open a bottle of cheap Champagne. :banana:
 

redbeard

Hummingbird
Gold Member
+1 on cold brew coffee.

I make it but don't waste time with the filtering process.

I pour water in a 64 oz Mason Jar and put the grounds in a nut milk bag. Funny name, effective tool. Once the coffee is done, you pull the bag out, dump the grounds, and the coffee is ready to go.
 

Grenblin

Sparrow
Gold Member
I make cold brew mainly when the weather is warm.
Just using a regular French press. No need to waste filters. Stick it in the fridge in the morning and it's ready by next morning. Pour it out, fill it up with fresh grounds and water. Repeat daily.
 

redbeard

Hummingbird
Gold Member
I still use my MokaPot but I'm having issues.

I spent the last few years in Louisiana where it's hot humid and at sea level. Now that I'm in Utah, my coffee SUCKS. The elevation (and lack of humidity) makes water boil at a lower temperature.

What ends up happening is that the water starts to boil, and makes nice coffee, dripping out of the MokaPot's spigot nicely. However the temperature keeps rising, and the flow turns from dark brown joy to hot cream blast. If you have the top open it'll spray everywhere, and it's not good coffee, since the water is passing through the pot so quickly.

I've tried different grinds and blends and turned down the heat, but it's still not the same.

Wondering if anyone in other high altitude cities (looking at you, Bogota) have any best practices to share.
 

bootyhuntah

Woodpecker
Gold Member
redbeard said:
I still use my MokaPot but I'm having issues.

I spent the last few years in Louisiana where it's hot humid and at sea level. Now that I'm in Utah, my coffee SUCKS. The elevation (and lack of humidity) makes water boil at a lower temperature.

What ends up happening is that the water starts to boil, and makes nice coffee, dripping out of the MokaPot's spigot nicely. However the temperature keeps rising, and the flow turns from dark brown joy to hot cream blast. If you have the top open it'll spray everywhere, and it's not good coffee, since the water is passing through the pot so quickly.

I've tried different grinds and blends and turned down the heat, but it's still not the same.

Wondering if anyone in other high altitude cities (looking at you, Bogota) have any best practices to share.
What coffee are you using? Is the roast level on the darker side? I recommend trying a lighter roast of a denser bean like a high altitude Kenyan/ethiopian. And of course taking the grind a good bit finer. Should create a bit more flow resistance for you.

Otherwise, it may be time to upgrade your setup. I suggest the clever dripper, Kalita wave, aeropress, or V60.

Here in Houston, I usually take my water up to 195F for the manual methods listed above for a medium-fine grind and a medium-light roast. Gives great results. For lighter roasts, sometimes 200F to help improve rate of extraction. Higher temp = higher rate of extraction = higher flow. Finer grind and lighter roast = slower flow.

Will be relocating to CO myself shortly, and I'll be having to retune my coffee brewing setup as well. Good luck!
 

Leads

Robin
In Macendonia, I bought a sack of Chaga mushroom powder and started adding it to my coffee. Instant mood spike and vision-improvement (possibly due to the increased light sensitivity) and really an overall energy-plateau lift that lasted all day. Also, unexpected power-boners for no reason.

Overall though, a strong sense of 'well being'. The whole thing actually made me not smoke weed, which is a miracle by itself (cuz I try to always have the best shit possible).

On the shelf, they also had Reishi and Cordyceps powder. It's all worth messing around with for sure IMO
 

redbeard

Hummingbird
Gold Member
bootyhuntah said:
redbeard said:
I still use my MokaPot but I'm having issues.

I spent the last few years in Louisiana where it's hot humid and at sea level. Now that I'm in Utah, my coffee SUCKS. The elevation (and lack of humidity) makes water boil at a lower temperature.

What ends up happening is that the water starts to boil, and makes nice coffee, dripping out of the MokaPot's spigot nicely. However the temperature keeps rising, and the flow turns from dark brown joy to hot cream blast. If you have the top open it'll spray everywhere, and it's not good coffee, since the water is passing through the pot so quickly.

I've tried different grinds and blends and turned down the heat, but it's still not the same.

Wondering if anyone in other high altitude cities (looking at you, Bogota) have any best practices to share.
What coffee are you using? Is the roast level on the darker side? I recommend trying a lighter roast of a denser bean like a high altitude Kenyan/ethiopian. And of course taking the grind a good bit finer. Should create a bit more flow resistance for you.

Otherwise, it may be time to upgrade your setup. I suggest the clever dripper, Kalita wave, aeropress, or V60.

Here in Houston, I usually take my water up to 195F for the manual methods listed above for a medium-fine grind and a medium-light roast. Gives great results. For lighter roasts, sometimes 200F to help improve rate of extraction. Higher temp = higher rate of extraction = higher flow. Finer grind and lighter roast = slower flow.

Will be relocating to CO myself shortly, and I'll be having to retune my coffee brewing setup as well. Good luck!

Update - I got it to work.

I was using coarse grain from a grocery store. It was decent but nothing amazing. I went back to old reliable - Cafe Bustelo, and found better results.

Then I turned down the heat EVEN MORE. We're talking 2 or 3 out of 10. It takes much longer to make coffee, but shit it is fucking delicious. If you watch the first few drops come out, they are MUDDY as hell, and make that robust taste I love.
 

Veul

Pigeon
For French press what type of coffee you buy ? I read that it should not be done with the espresso powder but with a "coarser" powder.
 
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