The Colin Kaepernick thread

Super_Fire

Kingfisher
Just in case you had some momentary lapse of judgement and decided to ever read GQ, the bible for the modern emasculated man, again:

https://www.gq.com/story/colin-kaepernick-will-not-be-silenced

Colin Kaepernick Will Not Be Silenced
BY THE EDITORS OF GQ

Colin%20Kaepernick%20-%201217%20Cover3.jpg


He's been vilified by millions and locked out of the NFL—all because he took a knee to protest police brutality. But Colin Kaepernick's determined stand puts him in rare company in sports history: Muhammad Ali, Jackie Robinson—athletes who risked everything to make a difference.

In 2013, Colin Kaepernick was on the cover of this magazine because he was one of the best football players in the world. In 2017, Colin Kaepernick is on GQ's cover once again—but this time it is because he isn't playing football. And it's not because he's hurt, or because he's broken any rules, or because he's not good enough. Approximately 90 men are currently employed as quarterbacks in the NFL, as either starters or reserves, and Colin Kaepernick is better—indisputably, undeniably, flat-out better—than at least 70 of them. He is still, to this day, one of the most gifted quarterbacks on earth. And yet he has been locked out of the game he loves—blackballed—because of one simple gesture: He knelt during the playing of our national anthem. And he did it for a clear reason, one that has been lost in the yearlong storm that followed. He did it to protest systemic oppression and, more specifically, as he said repeatedly at the time, police brutality toward black people.

"I see what he's done as art. I believe that art is seeing the world that doesn't exist. A lot of people excel at creativity—making TV, movies, painting, writing books—but you can be an artist in your own life. Civil rights activists are artists. Athletes are artists. People who imagine something that is not there. I think some folks see his protests, his resistance, as not his work. Not intentional. Not strategic. Not as progressive action. As if this was just a moment that he got caught up in. This was work. This is work that he's doing."

Ava DuVernay
Filmmaker, Selma, 13th, and 2018's A Wrinkle in Time

"What I always tell people is, I could teach you about the law, I could teach you about the criminal-justice system—but I can't teach you how to have heart. We don't need a movement full of experts. We need people who care deeply to stand up and offer what they have, because there's a role for everyone. You make music? Make some for the movement. You cook? Organizers need to be fed. You teach self-defense or yoga? Help people heal. You're an athlete? Use your platform to raise awareness...I'm a proud Mexican-American and Chicana who deeply believes that black lives matter and that once black people are free, then my people will be free."

Carmen Perez
Activist, executive director of The Gathering for Justice, which addresses mass incarceration and child incarceration

"But then, at some point in time, he becomes conscious about what's happening in the world. And suddenly something that he's been doing blindly for his whole life—standing for the national anthem—now feels uncomfortable. Why? Because now it feels phony! It feels like, Man, how can I stand for this thing when this country is not holding itself true to the principles it says it stands for? I feel like we're lying."

J. Cole
Rapper

"My position is that people should not be watching football right now, while we're in the middle of this, because we don't need to add to their ratings. We need to ensure that we're not on social media talking about the game as if Colin Kaepernick is not still up for deliberation. Now, I have some family members who have said to me that they don't agree. But if everybody agreed about everything, our society wouldn't be as diverse. And I think that where an opinion turns into the oppression of another human being, or a group of people, that's where we must draw the line.

Some people want to argue, "But the national anthem may not be a place for this because this is about all of us as Americans, the American dream, and American freedom." And then I have to give them the history of the third verse that Francis Scott Key wrote, which refers directly to us as slaves, and being unable to escape the wrath of slave owners. When I bring that to them, they begin to understand.

Tamika Mallory
National co-chair for Women's March; activist on issues related to women's rights, health care, anti-violence, and ethical police conduct

"The problem is that his particular activism was toward the cause of blackness. That's what he's being ostracized for...It's only with him that it's questioned. The irony now is that the NFL is trying to make him voiceless because he made himself a voice for the voiceless. Which is one of the reasons I'll die on that sword to defend what he has done. Because he did it for the people."

Ameer Hasan Loggins
Writer and U.C. Berkeley academic, lecturer, onetime Bay Area hip-hop icon

"The Bible talks very explicitly in Proverbs about being the voice of the voiceless and speaking up for the vulnerable. Another verse is: "Faith without works is dead." I guess selfishly I'm trying to get to heaven."

Eric Reid
Safety for the San Francisco 49ers, Kaepernick's former teammate, and the first NFL player to join him in kneeling during the anthem

"In my view, the most pernicious element of white backlash against Colin's protest has been the way in which the narrative has been co-opted and re-framed so that taking a knee is now somehow synonymous with disrespecting the flag, with a lack of patriotism. The American flag is not a neutral ideology—it represents something very, very specific to most folk. When someone comes along and tries to point out the history, for instance, of the national anthem, or the emergence of the American flag and its various iterations over time, and asks very difficult questions of "an adolescent country"—that's a James Baldwin phrase—it becomes uncomfortable. You may recall Ruth Bader Ginsburg's comments last year, when Colin started his protest. Someone who's known as a fairly liberal, left-leaning, or moderate, or whatever terms you wanna use, Supreme Court justice called his protest "dumb and disrespectful." Which is fascinating, because many folks have pointed out that politicians on the right, obviously those in the White House, have been very critical of these protests. But often it's bipartisan.


My hope is that Colin's protest will help mainstream white America to come alive to the deep injustices of our time and of our nation's history. That's the beginning of what the world needs."

Christopher Petrella
Writer and scholar at Bates College

"I always tell Colin: "You are an American hero. You may not feel like a hero right now, but one day, people will realize the sacrifices that you made for so many others." There might even be a day when we'll be walking down Colin Kaepernick Boulevard and people will remember what Colin Kaepernick did, just like we remember Muhammad Ali. And I truly believe that in my heart."

Linda Sarsour
Activist, co-organizer of the Women's March on Washington, former executive director of the Arab American Association of New York

"Trump has betrayed our nation. Taking a shot at him is worthy of all of us. Not being "political" is not a solution. Any young person who takes that position would have to ask Muhammad Ali and Jackie Robinson and so many of us if we had anything at stake. I know how someone who is young can get the feeling that this is the worst things have been. I see how someone could think that. But it's going to be okay. Even in the Trump era, America is going to be okay."

Harry Belafonte
Artist, activist, legend
 

Guile

Robin
RE: GQ Picks Colin Kaepernick as Citizen of the Year

He's a child. Dude doesn't have a job because he's shit at what he does comparative to his competition. You win, you keep your job. He's a perennial loser, hence his job is gone. Should have used his talents to chase a Superbowl ring rather than a GQ participation trophy.​
 

Leonard D Neubache

Owl
Gold Member
RE: GQ Picks Colin Kaepernick as Citizen of the Year

Simp got used and abused by globalist snakes who gave zero fucks about his outcomes when the bus rolled over him and now give zero fucks about parading around the corpse of his career.

Now he get's to pose for GQ and wonder when being a political pawn for the globalist cabal and their useful idiots is going to stop those zeroes disappearing off the end of his bank statement.

Suicide watch.
 

Kona

Crow
Gold Member
RE: GQ Picks Colin Kaepernick as Citizen of the Year

GQ is what gays jerk off to at the sperm bank. My friend told me.

Being their man of the year is quite an honor.

Aloha!
 

Thomas More

Hummingbird
RE: GQ Picks Colin Kaepernick as Citizen of the Year

Future GQ Headlines:

Testosterone: Not All It's Cracked Up To Be

Pussy: Not All It's Cracked Up To Be

Estrogen: The missing link to maskuliniti

FOO! GEB3 ME YUB MONEY

Sharia: Why it's right for you

Who do3snt get p3gg3ed by their "girlfriend" daily?

Edit: had to move quotes in last line.
 

anthony

Pelican
RE: GQ Picks Colin Kaepernick as Citizen of the Year

A failure of a man using politics (sitting on the bench the first time during the national anthem) to cover up how pissed he was for being benched (and not being "good enough" at QB) is GQ man of the year. How is this a surprise?
 

Delta

Kingfisher
RE: GQ Picks Colin Kaepernick as Citizen of the Year

So have relations between police and the black community improved as a result of these protests? :laugh:

I'll hold off until they actually accomplish something positive before labeling Kaepernick et al. as "heroes."
 
RE: GQ Picks Colin Kaepernick as Citizen of the Year

Yea that was really brave protesting right after he was benched and relegated to 2nd string. John Rocker said offensive stuff and was suspended without pay. Collin turned down a minimum offer from san fran and chose to be a free agent and never apologized for what he did.
 

Thrill Jackson

Kingfisher
Gold Member
RE: GQ Picks Colin Kaepernick as Citizen of the Year

He had a decent qb rating. Dude should be in the league as a backup or something. I completely disagree with the "issues" he was protesting about but I do believe he should be in the league.
 

beta_plus

Pelican
RE: GQ Picks Colin Kaepernick as Citizen of the Year

Thrill Jackson said:
He had a decent qb rating. Dude should be in the league as a backup or something. I completely disagree with the "issues" he was protesting about but I do believe he should be in the league.

The problem is now that regardless of how good a player he is, Kap has turned himself into ratings and box office poison.

I'm pretty sure Mark Geragos will get him back in the league.

And that will cause the NFL to lose more ratings, more Sunday Ticket subscribers, and more ticket sales.

Mark Geragos will likely win his case and permanently cripple the NFL.
 

Buck Wild

Kingfisher
RE: GQ Picks Colin Kaepernick as Citizen of the Year

beta_plus said:
Thrill Jackson said:
He had a decent qb rating. Dude should be in the league as a backup or something. I completely disagree with the "issues" he was protesting about but I do believe he should be in the league.

The problem is now that regardless of how good a player he is, Kap has turned himself into ratings and box office poison.

I'm pretty sure Mark Geragos will get him back in the league.

And that will cause the NFL to lose more ratings, more Sunday Ticket subscribers, and more ticket sales.

Mark Geragos will likely win his case and permanently cripple the NFL.


I definitely agree the guy has the skills/talent to be a backup...

But we're far beyond that now. At this point, the owners really can't afford to let him back in the league. They simply cannot permit a precedent to be set that any guy, no matter how talented, can drum up a social media circus to get a second bite at the NFL apple when a decision has clearly been made that his services are no longer needed. If you allow that, you've completely lost control of the teams and the league. And for all the super-lawyer hype, Geragos is overrated--he's won as many as he's lost in recent years.

I think the league beats him here and Kap is left high-and-dry.

@Atlanta Man
Why are you so favorably disposed toward Kaepernick? Not in any way attacking you--just curious.
 
RE: GQ Picks Colin Kaepernick as Citizen of the Year

I bet the NFL isn't even losing money right now. Goodell just asked for a raise to $50 million a year They must be still making fat profits if he feels comfortable asking for that much.

Most of their profits are locked in long-term deals with TV networks, ticket guarantees from cities, etc... I doubt game-day ticket sales are much at all of their total revenue. If other tech companies fill the void of ESPN down the road and still pay fat money for broadcast rights that's all that matters to the NFL.
I don't like Kaepernick but the idea of his presence 'crippling' the league I think are highly overblown. Demographic change is a bigger problem for them.
 
RE: GQ Picks Colin Kaepernick as Citizen of the Year

This guy is gayer than Prince. Follicly fascinated heterosexual men are a pox on the brand. There should be an effortlessness to it. Not this greenskeeper approach.
 

Atlanta Man

Ostrich
Gold Member
RE: GQ Picks Colin Kaepernick as Citizen of the Year

I don't really care about sports but Colin got the cover of GQ, so good for him-I do not hate, I congratulate.
 

Nordwand

Kingfisher
RE: GQ Picks Colin Kaepernick as Citizen of the Year

The recipients of the awards given by the UK edition weren't exactly my cup of tea either - quite how Top Gear won something is beyond me, given that they're a bunch of un PC middle aged, middle class white men.
 

porscheguy

Ostrich
RE: GQ Picks Colin Kaepernick as Citizen of the Year

He tried to be an attention whore and got burned. What does he know about oppression? If he played football in high school he was placed on a pedestal. As a college player his SMV was sky high, and he was placed on a pedestal. The nfl didn’t exactly place him on a pedestal, but they did pay him a few million dollars. He may have been a decent qb but the nfl has lots of them. What does he know about oppression?
 
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