The Dave Chappelle thread

realologist

Ostrich
Gold Member
RE: Dave Chappelle Red Pill Stand Up. 2000

You can't look at comedy in a left vs. right, red pill vs. blue pill, triggered vs. the triggers. Comedy is meant to be looked of in the forum of comedy.

If you can make fun of others and yourself you can't be in comedy either as a fan or comedian. Don't let politics get in the way of some funny jokes.
 
RE: Dave Chappelle Red Pill Stand Up. 2000

New Netflix special is out - Sticks and Stones:


I thought it was pretty good, he goes after liberals and LGBT people in this one.
 

CynicalContrarian

Owl
Gold Member
Yep.
Burr & Stanhope's ability to joke beyond themselves & joke in abstract / lateral ways definitely set them apart.

That said.
This latest Chappelle special was cool.
Simply would have been better if he didn't feel compelled to justify his past material or explain why it's OK to not be PC.
 

Rorogue

Kingfisher
TooFineAPoint said:
Rorogue said:
Only genius comic working today.

Burr, Stanhope, and CK beg to differ.

I did stand up myself. Was pretty darn good at it (old man voice)

Burr a tier below..doesn't have the vastness of perspective that the top 10-15 comics of all time have.

Louis CK absolutely but he does not seem to be working today beyond small clubs- Netflix won't put him on.

Never found Stanhope funny. Seems an alcoholic degenerate.
 

Rorogue

Kingfisher
Best stand ups of all time in my opinion

Pryor
Hicks
Lenny Bruce
Cosby
Carlin
Dangerfield
Eddie Murphy
Patrice O'Neal
Dave Chappelle

Very American centric, but whatever.
 

debeguiled

Peacock
Gold Member
Rorogue said:
Best stand ups of all time in my opinion

Pryor
Hicks
Lenny Bruce
Cosby
Carlin
Dangerfield
Eddie Murphy
Patrice O'Neal
Dave Chappelle

Very American centric, but whatever.

Just for the sake of discussion.

Pryor

Pryor is commonly agreed to be the best of all time by most comedians. I saw him live in the 70's, and when he was being himself, he was like no other. He had an ability to share the deepest trauma in his life and make it funny. He could be really raw and had you going back and forth between emotions.

The thing was though, I would say that at least 40 percent of his act, he sounded like a Bill Cosby impersonator. He was obviously influenced by Cosby and it was only later that he found the fullness of his own voice.

Hicks and Patrice

I put Hicks and Patrice in the category of stand up philosophers. You would listen to them even if they weren't funny. The depth of their thinking was on another level. Everything made so much sense about life when you listened to them, like they were just saying something obvious that you had never quite put together. I would also say both of them had a nihilistic edge, unsurprising when you dig that deep, that made them unfunny at times and a little savage. Personally I prefer this type of comic. Not just funny. Had ideas about life that you probably couldn't have thought of. Patrice was a deadly ad libber as well. Other comics were scared of him.

Lenny Bruce

Bruce said the unsayable. He broke boundaries and paid a heavy price. He wasn't funny though. I know comedy doesn't wear well, and the innovators often sound like they are imitating their own imitators. Even with that understanding, he wasn't that funny. To me he was more like a beatnik/hippy trying to blow your mind man.

Cosby

One of the best for sure with a legacy tainted by unrepentant predatory nature. I still believed him when it was only 20 accusers. The numbers just kept going up. It is hard even to think about him other than to say I loved his early albums.

Carlin

I don't really like Carlin that much, though he does deserve to be on the list. For longevity if nothing else. He was really big in the seventies, and he seemed like he had taken that 60's spirit of questioning authority and actually done something with it instead of getting lost in drugs and resentment. Could also be considered a stand up philosopher.

Dangerfield.

A journeyman comedian, a craftsman, a tradesman. Seinfeld goes here too. They learned the forms and the craft and the timing and perfected it. Not geniuses or anything. A craftsman. Like Henny Youngman. I would put someone like Steven Wright above him. Another craftsman who actually took it to another level by adding his own surreal intellect and character to the craft of writing jokes.

Eddie Murphy.

Comic genius.

Dave Chapelle

I am the wrong one to have an opinion about him. Everyone likes him and I am just lukewarm. Comedians think he is a genius. So I will take a pass on having an opinion. Just can't get in to him. He is obviously smart though and and independent thinker.


If I could only listen to one comedian from your list from now on, it would be Patrice, followed not that closely by Hicks.

So, as for who you left off:

No Steve Martin?

Steve Martin was insanely popular in the 70's as a comic. First guy to sell out stadiums. Completely original. A deeper understanding of humor, with jokes that had completely original structures and principles. Insane improviser who would take the audience off on improvised romps after shows out in the streets. He was the Pewdiepie of his day.

His problem is that his brand of humor has influenced so many other comics that his material doesn't stand up that well any more. When he did it, no one else had ever done it, only now, everyone does it, so it looks lame.

He was the first person in show business I ever saw to make fun of the idea of show business. Or as a writer once said of him, he only had one joke, and he was it. What other comic would have the self awareness to come on stage and say:

"Hey, wouldn't want to be the center of attention or anything."

Bill Burr belongs on your list. A truth teller and at least somewhat red pilled.

Robin Williams too, is one of the most original comedians of all time and a complete, cosmic phenomen in his day. He made other comedians want to quit. I can't see leaving him off the list.

Some honorable mentions: Brian Regan. Steven Wright again.

Stewart Lee is a comic genius and the only person who has really figured out how to be intellectual and a stand up comedian. His sets are like novels with through lines, subplots, or like musical arrangements. He is smart smart smart, and he is always going somewhere and saying something. His sets aren't just collections of jokes. He has larger points to make that all the jokes and smaller bits of business are in support of. Next level.

A couple of probably unpopular ones. Garrison Keillor will be remembered as one of the great comedians of our day. More of a humorist than a stand up, but loved by millions. His weekly monologues were mostly improvised and brought humor almost to the level of high art. Political and social commentary. A completely new show every week! Most comedians take a couple years to do it.

Finally, Paula Poundstone. The greatest stand up improviser I have ever seen. Her prepared material was pretty good, but she actually seemed to relax and gain strength when she went off script. Her improvised jokes were better than 99% of the prepared jokes in the world. The only improviser I have ever seen who was better than she was is Ryan Stiles, but he isn't a stand up. He does sketches.

She could not only riff off audience members, she could create long lasting melodramas between audience members, weaving what she had said about one audience member with what she was saying about another, and creating a kind of an improvised play utilizing the personalities of the people in the audience. Like a one woman "Who's Line Is It Anyway."
 
Kudos on bringing up Steve Martin, but he collapsed a little as a comic in his later years. Still, at his best he was not only funny, but kind of uplifting and warm too.

Saw Bill Cosby in one of his last big performances. It's incredibly hard to describe how powerful and talented that man is, especially since none of his TV shows or Movies come close to his Live performance affect.
 

RIslander

Hummingbird
I can't say I ever really found Steve Martin funny but Father of the Bride was always entertaining.

Not my style of humor but I cracked a smile.

 

debeguiled

Peacock
Gold Member
RIslander said:
I can't say I ever really found Steve Martin funny but Father of the Bride was always entertaining.

Not my style of humor but I cracked a smile.


I remember when this King Tut bit came out. It wasn't funny even then.

The thing is, before Martin came along, most comedians you would see were Las Vegas guys in suits and sweaters who told jokes in traditional ways.

Martin was the first modern guy to really be just silly. So it was a big deal. He inspired guys like Brian Regan and Jim Carrey who took it further. What about David Letterman thinking celebrity is idiotic? Martin did that first. Now everyone on Youtube is silly. So you cannot see the innovation.

Here are a couple of clips that are closer to what I am saying. Basically he is taking a crap on the idea that being a celebrity is important.

The first one he is on the Tonight Show trying to pretend he is a big deal and failing:


Or in this one, he is pretending he is important because he is *friends* with Johnny Cash:


In that second clip where he gets hung up on the exact time of day? That is exactly the kind of joke he innovated. Just weird, unexpected, non traditional.
 

Rorogue

Kingfisher
rotekz said:
Chappelle's gag writers have been watching Owen.

I saw a very similar Chappelle joke about LGBT about 4 years ago on YouTube.
It was taken with a camera phone at one of his gigs.. I just remember a line when he said "that T shit is fucking it all up" and pissed myself laughing.

I tried to find it for years afterwards but it had been taken down, I assume because it was recorded at an unfilmed gig.
 
debeguiled said:
RIslander said:
I can't say I ever really found Steve Martin funny but Father of the Bride was always entertaining.

Not my style of humor but I cracked a smile.


I remember when this King Tut bit came out. It wasn't funny even then.

The thing is, before Martin came along, most comedians you would see were Las Vegas guys in suits and sweaters who told jokes in traditional ways.

Martin was the first modern guy to really be just silly. So it was a big deal. He inspired guys like Brian Regan and Jim Carrey who took it further. What about David Letterman thinking celebrity is idiotic? Martin did that first. Now everyone on Youtube is silly. So you cannot see the innovation.

Here are a couple of clips that are closer to what I am saying. Basically he is taking a crap on the idea that being a celebrity is important.

The first one he is on the Tonight Show trying to pretend he is a big deal and failing:


Or in this one, he is pretending he is important because he is *friends* with Johnny Cash:


In that second clip where he gets hung up on the exact time of day? That is exactly the kind of joke he innovated. Just weird, unexpected, non traditional.

His "Holiday Wish" bit on SNL is one of the best that was ever on that program, and I start every Christmas with it.

yXBfs2iLHRE

Back to Chappelle, the Jussie joke is a perfect example of what I mean by being underwhelmed by the latest special (I really like Dave, by the way, just was bored with this one).

The whole setup ("French", "Juicy", black people knowing he was lying immediately... which this forum pointed out as it was happening) was great. Then the joke just petered out. The Kayne ending was underwhelming.

I have no idea if this is true or not, but it feels like Dave is really coasting right now. He's in a zen place, which is nice for him, but it took a bit of edge off the comedy I feel.
 

RIslander

Hummingbird
TooFineAPoint said:
debeguiled said:
RIslander said:
I can't say I ever really found Steve Martin funny but Father of the Bride was always entertaining.

Not my style of humor but I cracked a smile.


I remember when this King Tut bit came out. It wasn't funny even then.

The thing is, before Martin came along, most comedians you would see were Las Vegas guys in suits and sweaters who told jokes in traditional ways.

Martin was the first modern guy to really be just silly. So it was a big deal. He inspired guys like Brian Regan and Jim Carrey who took it further. What about David Letterman thinking celebrity is idiotic? Martin did that first. Now everyone on Youtube is silly. So you cannot see the innovation.

Here are a couple of clips that are closer to what I am saying. Basically he is taking a crap on the idea that being a celebrity is important.

The first one he is on the Tonight Show trying to pretend he is a big deal and failing:


Or in this one, he is pretending he is important because he is *friends* with Johnny Cash:


In that second clip where he gets hung up on the exact time of day? That is exactly the kind of joke he innovated. Just weird, unexpected, non traditional.

His "Holiday Wish" bit on SNL is one of the best that was ever on that program, and I start every Christmas with it.

yXBfs2iLHRE

Back to Chappelle, the Jussie joke is a perfect example of what I mean by being underwhelmed by the latest special (I really like Dave, by the way, just was bored with this one).

The whole setup ("French", "Juicy", black people knowing he was lying immediately... which this forum pointed out as it was happening) was great. Then the joke just petered out. The Kayne ending was underwhelming.

I have no idea if this is true or not, but it feels like Dave is really coasting right now. He's in a zen place, which is nice for him, but it took a bit of edge off the comedy I feel.

The thing is now this act would be considered racist and Islamophobic. The modern liberal of course will neglect the fact Islam did not exist in the 1300's BC.
 
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