The decline of rock music

Oberrheiner

Pelican

Things change as times pass.

Leftism used to be a thing in france, until the 80s where they seized power and showed their true face.
Or maybe more realistically the 90s, when what they did became actually visible to most.
Some people still don't realize that even today though.

I wouldn't blame young people for having wanted to believe in it - errare humanum est.
But yeah, now is certainly the time to wake the f up if you still didn't.
 

911

Peacock
Gold Member
The Boomers' music was actually pretty good, it was a time when MOR (middle of the road) mainstream pop was at peak quality, much like in the early 80s, which was the beginning of electronic-powered pop.

Vox has terrible taste in music, his old band was crap and he's not a good judge of musical quality. This being said, the cult of acts like the Beatles or Bob "Dylan" Zimmerman is way over the top, but the mid/late 60s era had an unprecedented level of depth with a lot of talent rising organically along the trail of ClA-sponsored acts like the Grateful Dead.
 

ilostabet

Pelican
The Boomers' music was actually pretty good, it was a time when MOR (middle of the road) mainstream pop was at peak quality, much like in the early 80s, which was the beginning of electronic-powered pop.

Vox has terrible taste in music, his old band was crap and he's not a good judge of musical quality. This being said, the cult of acts like the Beatles or Bob "Dylan" Zimmerman is way over the top, but the mid/late 60s era had an unprecedented level of depth with a lot of talent rising organically along the trail of ClA-sponsored acts like the Grateful Dead.

Despite their CIA sponsor, The Dead are still a thousand times better than whatever CIA sponsors today. Fun fact: Tucker Carlson is a deadhead.
 

lonewolf1968

Woodpecker
I've always thought the blues was overrated as a genre. I mean, I can listen to these artists for a song or two but I quickly grow tired of the music because it's essentially the same song structure as the last.

And while we're on the subject, why was Robert Johnson considered such a great player? I listened to those two songs you posted and there is nothing spectacular about his playing. If he made a deal with the devil to be a talented musician, I think he got gypped.
I love blues, it's more akin to rap in the sense it's all about improvisation and expressing in the moment (or the other way around?). For a player if you're full of emotions is incredible when the turnaround gives entry to the solo sections and you let it all out. Blues players are rapping with their fingers in some sort of sense, that's how I see it. It's very rudimental and simplistic, yes. From the point of view of a 21century listener when you have all sorts of ear candy and more complex styles of Pop music around, it may be perceived as boring, repetitive, etc. For a worker, child, individual, at its time it's the same as rap, you only needed a couple of guitars and a harmonica to express your self, and you didn't need to be a great player to express emotions. Just my take on this.
 

Hermetic Seal

Kingfisher
Gold Member
The problem with the rock music of the 60s and early 70s is that a lot of these artists weren't inherently all that great, they just showed up at the right time and right place while rock music was still young and it was easy to innovate. When you're early in some new musical style (or art, or various other things) you seem really original because you're doing stuff for the first time. When you're a literal pioneer showing up in a new town in Gold Rush California, you can open your shoe store or grocer or whatever and reap big rewards. But twenty years later, when the town is already filled with businesses, it's much harder to make your business succeed because you've got competition.

At some point, artists seem to "max out" a style and take it as far as they can. An album like Rush's "Hemispheres" objectively blows away most 1960s rock in creativity and musicianship, but the band changed their style up afterward because they'd done everything they could in the progressive-epic genre.

If the Beatles or Rolling Stones or whoever were to show up today, nobody would notice them. That's not to say that they're totally without talent or anything like that, but contributions of these kinds of artists are heavily colored by the time and place they emerged. "Yesterday," while an entertaining premise for a movie, is implausible and far-fetched.
 

stugatz

Pelican
Vox has terrible taste in music, his old band was crap and he's not a good judge of musical quality. This being said, the cult of acts like the Beatles or Bob "Dylan" Zimmerman is way over the top, but the mid/late 60s era had an unprecedented level of depth with a lot of talent rising organically along the trail of ClA-sponsored acts like the Grateful Dead.
I saw that Vox post the other day and laughed out loud, especially at the line "to me, the main difference between classic rock and punk rock is that at least the punk rockers knew they didn't know how to play their instruments very well." Come on, really? Eric Clapton, Keith Richards, Jimmy Page, Brian May, Martin Barre, Lindsey Buckingham, Bruce Springsteen, all four Beatles (and countless more) just played three chords like your average punk band?

If you think classic rock is overrated, fine, but it's like the guy doesn't have functioning ears or something. I hope his gamma male rear end stays in Italy.


Frank Zappa had a pretty good take on why it seemed like music in the 1980s and 1990s had dipped in quality. Although today, I yearn for that era...who knew I'd miss Robert Palmer and Toto.
 

Cicero12

Pigeon
Multiple cases of rappers flagrantly stealing lyrics from rock videos. I don't care what people say, playing an instrument and singing will always be more than using a machine to make music. Modern trap music is not only unoriginal and repetitive., its degenerate and perfidious.

This is coming from a edm fan, I frankly think that the late 90s-early 2000s period of electronic music popularity with people like tiesto and avicii ended the dominance of actual physical music being popular.
 

fokker

Pelican
I anticipated Hardwired to Self-Destruct when it was about to come out. I haven't listened to it in a while, but I remember liking "Atlas Rise". Kill 'Em All will always be the best Metallica album, as far as I'm concerned.
 

third_eldest

Sparrow
I anticipated Hardwired to Self-Destruct when it was about to come out. I haven't listened to it in a while, but I remember liking "Atlas Rise". Kill 'Em All will always be the best Metallica album, as far as I'm concerned.
I really like Master of Puppets as well. So many good songs, love the common theme of the soldier's disdain for what the establishment made them into.
 
Early Metallica is great, but nothing they’ve done recently rises above mediocre IMO. Trivium’s album “The Crusade,” despite its “woke” lyrics at times, was a solid evolution on the Metallica sound that they’ve unfortunately backtracked from ever since.
 

stugatz

Pelican
What's yall's opinions on Metallica here? I started listening to them in January because I wanted to expand my music taste and I was like "dang I was missing out this stuff rocks!" I particularly like the anti-war themes in many of their early albums.
Metallica's first three albums are classics (Kill 'Em All a little less so - just some early installment weirdness there, they had not long ago fired Dave Mustaine and their sound was still developing). And Justice is a little too prog-metal for my taste, but I would own it. I pretty strongly dislike the Black Album even though it's got some great songs on it.

Here's where I part company with most people. I actually don't outright hate Load and Reload - if you took the good songs off of both of those, you'd have an EP slightly under 30 minutes. So three quarters of both of those albums are terrible.

St. Anger is trash, even if you've found decent mixes of it on YouTube (they certainly exist - no more Lars Ulrich trashcan snare drum).

Death Magnetic is uh....fine? The songs are just so forgettable, though, other than Day That Never Comes. I listened to Hardwired a couple years back and have pretty much the same opinion on that one.

The band went downhill after Cliff Burton died and never really came back.
 
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