The Documentaries Thread

jarlo

Woodpecker
We've got a few threads for movies, but I wanted to start one specifically for documentaries.

I watched Bigger, Stronger, Faster recently - it was an interesting take on the inconsistencies in how society think about steroid regulation as compared to other drugs:


I'd give it a 7/10 - worth watching if you're interested in sports, lifting, health, or the regulation of drugs, but not otherwise.
 
This is not really a documentary, just an interview with an intelligent guy who grew up and lived in Nigeria.

I thought it was interesting since it relates a bit to the so called resource curse and how things in Nigeria just seems like they went downhill when they discovered oil there, when one would think that it would actually be a great thing for the country. So they probably would have been better off if they didn't discover oil there. I think it's fascinating and good thing is that you could just listen to the interview and have it on in the background while you do something else.


 

jarlo

Woodpecker
This is not really a documentary, just an interview with an intelligent guy who grew up and lived in Nigeria.

I thought it was interesting since it relates a bit to the so called resource curse and how things in Nigeria just seems like they went downhill when they discovered oil there, when one would think that it would actually be a great thing for the country. So they probably would have been better off if they didn't discover oil there. I think it's fascinating and good thing is that you could just listen to the interview and have it on in the background while you do something else.


This looks very interesting - thanks for the share. I thought this YouTube comment on the video was insightful:

As a Nigerian, I started listening to this with my guards up like I wanted to be offended. I had this whole mindset about how the western world is always depicting West Africa or Africa as some wretched and dangerous place while conveniently leaving out the great things about it. Then I realized just how butthurt I was.

Listening to CS MGTOW recant his experiences and describe what it is like here, in Nigeria, I kept rebutting it and living in denial by telling myself it's not that bad; Lagos has changed; and worst of all - it's the norm here. And that's the problem; corruption and violence is a norm. I grew up watching mobs burn up petty thieves in the middle of the road; fights break out randomly only to end up in death and till now, never questioned it.

It's general knowledge to always make sure you're incredibly alert when you're in public places because you could have everything stolen without even realizing it. When I was younger and lived in a more violent environment that I do now, my dad had to call at least fifteen minutes before reaching the house so my uncle who lived with us could patrol with a huge pipe just to make sure no potential 'armed robbers' were lurking. All the while, every single lock was bolted keeping my mum, my siblings and I inside. Don't even let me get started on the defense force and our government.

It's not that I don't know I live in a violent environment, I just never realized the severity of it. It's all I've known and how I grew up and therefore, very normal. That thinking right there, as I've come to realize, is one of our huge problems. No one's questioning it. No one is willing to do anything about it. ('No one' refers to a vast majority since I'm aware there's a minority that do know this.)

The really funny but unfortunate thing is how, if I hear about a mob setting a man ablaze in a first world country, I'd be sickened by the inhumane act of violence. It's like when it comes to my home country, the same acts are just normal. Not morally acceptable but socially okay. Even though I know some local governments are actively trying to curb this violence in the cities, I gather it's not enough.

This, so far, has been very enlightening because I've come to realize just how severe our problems are and urgent the solutions are needed. Now that I know, I'm not sure on what next to do to help.
 

jarlo

Woodpecker
Ralfy: If you have a lot of documentaries to share at one time, maybe you could put them all inside a single post? And could you please also add a few words on each as to why you recommend them?

Ralfy, I would also like to know why you recommended them, and I agree with roketz's suggestion, since doing so helps keep the flow of conversation smoother. But thanks for your posts regardless!
 

ralfy

Robin
Ralfy, I would also like to know why you recommended them, and I agree with roketz's suggestion, since doing so helps keep the flow of conversation smoother. But thanks for your posts regardless!

Sorry, World at War is one of the best documentaries about WW2 because it's impressive humanizing qualities. The first episode alone is worth watching.

Ten-Thousand is well-paced and shows both sides of the war, with interviews of both famous personalities and those who experienced events firsthand.

Connections is a fun look at unexpected connections between one type of technology and another, with a very remarkable last episode. One can also see similar in Burke's After the Warming.

In the Year of the Pig is remarkable because it is one of the first documentaries about the war and contemporaneous.

The Battle of Chile and The Hour of the Furnaces are excellent depictions of neocolonialism in South America.

The Anderson Platoon offers a close-in view of what small operations looked like during the same war.

I also recommend The Century of the Self (shared earlier), together with Curtis' other works, like HyperNormalisation, as they look a remarkable hybrid of Connections and the documentaries on neocolonialism: ideologies combined with centers of power persuading societies in ways they did not expect.

In light of that, one may also consider broad portrayals of human experience, including The Ascent of Man (which combines science, evolution, and sociology, especially the brilliant episode on the Holocaust), Civilisation (which focuses on art) and Cosmos (on man's personal experiences and the universe).

Some more to consider in light of all of the documentaries mentioned so far: Nazis: A Warning from History, The Adventure of English, several of Ken Burns' documentaries (such as The Civil War and Jazz), and several mentioned in lists like these:




And don't forget Shoah:


 

Diocletian

Woodpecker
Sir Kenneth Clark's Civilization, broadcast in 13 episodes during 1969. Art history can be a fascinating subject, but unfortunately like most of the liberal arts it has been ravaged by leftists. This is a great documentary exploring the relationship between art and civilization/society. Its not just focused on art and architecture but also delves into music, philosophy, literature, etc. The first video is below.

It wasn't that long ago that people who considered themselves even moderately educated always had certain books on their shelves--the Holy Bible, Shakespeare, Homer, and various pieces of what you could call "popular intellectual works" like Encyclopedia Brittanica or National Geographic.

Civilization is one of the best of those popular intellectual works. Its worth buying on DVD before the online version gets canceled over its support for the classical art of Western civilization--you know sooner or later someone will try and possibly succeed.

 
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