The Generation Y Thread

Hermetic Seal

Pelican
Orthodox
Gold Member
If you were born roughly between 1979 and 1990, you had a childhood, at least in part, before the advent of the Internet and ubiquitous personal computers. Your generation is treated as though it doesn't exist, lumped in together with Millennials born 5-10 years later, who don't remember much of life in the 90s, or have a pre-Internet, pre-cell phone, pre-9/11 childhood.

If you are part of Gen Y, the temptation to view the past through rose-colored glasses is ever present, but not without merit, as the mainstream American culture of the 1980s through late 90s was objectively less toxic and with more merit than what followed it. We grew up largely without direct conflict and hardship, in a comfortable world where we thought everything would just keep getting better forever. But that future never arrived, and today we either wrestle with disillusionment, or retreat from reality by endlessly rehashing the entertainment and culture of our youth. In many ways Gen Y is a lost generation, and those aware of the fact - like authors Brian Niemeier, JD Cowan, and David V. Stewart - have had a lot of interesting stuff to say on this topic. A good compilation of some of their writings can be found here for free.

This thread is a place to talk about the broader cultural issues surrounding Gen Y, as well as content creators in the sphere. If there's already a thread more or less about this, feel free to roll this into it - though I don't think there is one.
 

dicknixon72

Ostrich
As I'm sure all members of a given cohort would argue, I feel Gen Y is the most adept at leading the world we face today. We have a keen grasp of technology without necessarily immersing ourselves in it and have the wherewithal to avoid letting it consume us. We have a blend of traditional work ethic with the sensibility to not become wage slaves.

That we are part of a generation that fits with neither Gen X or Millennials gives us that perspective. Embrace it, I say.
 

Caduceus

Ostrich
Xennial is a portmanteau blending the words Generation X and Millennials to describe a "micro-generation" or "cross-over generation"[of people whose birth years are between the late 1970s and the early 1980s.

Xennials
are the micro-generation of people on the cusp of the Generation X and Millennial demographic cohorts. Researchers and popular media use birth years from the mid 1970s to the early 1980s. Xennials are described as having had an analog childhood and a digital young adulthood.

In 2020, Xennial was included in the Oxford Dictionary of English.


 

Thomas More

Crow
Protestant
Looking forward to millennials showing up and explaining how they're not really millennials. Oh, wait, I see it has started.

:laughter::laughter::laughter:
I was born in 1964, so I'm not really a boomer, and not really Gen X either. My parents had a similar deal. They were born just before WWII, so they weren't boomers, but they were way to young to be the so-called Greatest Generation. They were already square adults when the first boomers came of age.

On one level, generational stereotypes often hold true. However, it seems like the ones born right at the transitions are misfits in either camp.
 

Wutang

Hummingbird
Gold Member
I'm of the mind that the reason Gen Z are the way they are as shown in the recent midterms is because they have consumed pop culture content that was produced by older millennials and younger Gen X people. Namely all the stuff about how being validated by the society and being accepted and being able to not only express yourself but have everyone clap as you do so. Watch a lot of the cartoons and pop culture stuff that was coming up in the 2010s and see what sort of values were being promoted on there.
 

Suburban Yahoo

Robin
Protestant
I was born in 1964, so I'm not really a boomer, and not really Gen X either. My parents had a similar deal. They were born just before WWII, so they weren't boomers, but they were way to young to be the so-called Greatest Generation. They were already square adults when the first boomers came of age.

On one level, generational stereotypes often hold true. However, it seems like the ones born right at the transitions are misfits in either camp.

I get it, I'm in the same boat. I've noticed though over the years--and even before Boomers became infamous--that my attitude about and approach to things is much more Gen-X than Boomer, so I identify as Gen-X.

Being in between the stock generations can be interesting.
 

Hermetic Seal

Pelican
Orthodox
Gold Member
I was born in 1964, so I'm not really a boomer, and not really Gen X either. My parents had a similar deal. They were born just before WWII, so they weren't boomers, but they were way to young to be the so-called Greatest Generation. They were already square adults when the first boomers came of age.

On one level, generational stereotypes often hold true. However, it seems like the ones born right at the transitions are misfits in either camp.

My parents, born about 1960, are technically considered Boomers but in fact are better described by the "Generation Jones" moniker. While they had much of the same generous material outcome as boomers, culturally and behaviorally they're somewhere in between Boomers and Gen X. For my parents and parents of my friends and peers growing up, I don't see much of the narcissism and entitlement that characterizes the stereotypical Boomer - though there is a strong sense of naivete, trust in the major institutions and systems, and so on, common to the Boomer.

My uncle, on the other hand, who's over five years older than my mother and father, is extremely Boomer; the difference of just a few years might seem abrupt, but I think a lot of it is based on cultural timing. Boomers were adolescents or teenagers during the cultural revolution of the 1960s and absorbed the full brunt of its impact, while Jones were just kids and it all flew over their heads before they were out of elementary school.

We have a keen grasp of technology without necessarily immersing ourselves in it and have the wherewithal to avoid letting it consume us.

This is a good point. I eschew the new, flashy smartphones for a basic, small screen, no-frills one, and I've gotten similar vibes from my demographic peers that they're largely disillusioned with the technocracy and have checked out, for the most part, from major platforms like Facebook and tediously repetitive gadgetry. When I was a kid I was enamored by the possibilities of computers and technology, but any faith I had in it died a decade ago as it was clear something had gone very wrong and the techno future of the 1990s never materialized.

Millennials, on the other hand, gobble this stuff up hook, line, and sinker. It was almost intentionally designed to ensnare them, and you won't find them questioning the tech narrative.
 

dicknixon72

Ostrich
This is a good point. I eschew the new, flashy smartphones for a basic, small screen, no-frills one, and I've gotten similar vibes from my demographic peers that they're largely disillusioned with the technocracy and have checked out, for the most part, from major platforms like Facebook and tediously repetitive gadgetry. When I was a kid I was enamored by the possibilities of computers and technology, but any faith I had in it died a decade ago as it was clear something had gone very wrong and the techno future of the 1990s never materialized.

Millennials, on the other hand, gobble this stuff up hook, line, and sinker. It was almost intentionally designed to ensnare them, and you won't find them questioning the tech narrative.

I feel Gen Y uses social media to accentuate their personality, not to act as an avatar for one that doesn't exist. My Facebook presence is very limited to a handful of long-distance acquaintances, what my profession requires for advertising, and special interest groups (mostly aviation and automobile-related) along with Marketplace.

Not only did we come of age during a time when the vast promises of instant communication didn't come of age, but we remember a life without it and the ability to exist with limited interaction with technology.
 

Viktor Zeegelaar

Crow
Orthodox Inquirer
Gen Y are in big trouble. They lack the window to the past. For millenials like me there was that window to the past, namely my grandparents who represented in presentation, clothing, house refurbishing, language, food and stories the time prior to Satan's full on attack on the West in the 60s. I could really see another time through them. Gen Y lacks that window. Their grandparents will be the fallen boomers. Their parents were inbetween. Gen Y will be the first generation that is formed entirely in the digital age and with all the traps that come with that. There will be lots of casualties.
 

Caduceus

Ostrich
Gen Y are in big trouble. They lack the window to the past. For millenials like me there was that window to the past, namely my grandparents who represented in presentation, clothing, house refurbishing, language, food and stories the time prior to Satan's full on attack on the West in the 60s. I could really see another time through them. Gen Y lacks that window. Their grandparents will be the fallen boomers. Their parents were inbetween. Gen Y will be the first generation that is formed entirely in the digital age and with all the traps that come with that. There will be lots of casualties.

Millennials are younger than generation Y, but older than Generation Z.
I think you're getting confused with generation Z.
 

7-5

Sparrow
Orthodox Inquirer
Solid millennial here.

Getting older and feel like I need to help the zoom zooms and whatever else comes after.

Was scrolling through the YouTube last week and saw video after video of 'Gen Z not informed' 'Gen Z not smart' 'Watch Gen Z do this or that ridiculous thing!'

Reminded me of videos aimed at me in my 20's I hated.
Then I realized: this is the proposed cycle.
They'll lure you with whatever trap they can snare you with, constantly demoralize rather than mentor you and drill irrelevant nonsense into your head from day one so you don't know left from right.

You'll be voting for who they say, buying what they tell you to buy and fighting for the causes they tell you to soldier for for.
.. at least the first 25 years of your life, if not longer.

I try as best I can show them alternatives. Be a good big brother.
 
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