The God pill

Another excerpt from “An Eternity of Heaven or Hell: Thoughts for Lent” by Reverend Clement Henry Crock:

There are those who say that such an eternal punishment is unreasonable, altogether out of proportion to a sin committed which takes but a brief moment of time. But such a comparison is not correctly drawn. We must first consider the nature of mortal sin for which hell is the punishment; secondly, the nature of the damned who are undergoing the punishment; and, thirdly, the nature of God Who imposes and enforces the punishment.

No one will go to hell against his will. Only those are there who have died unrepentant, with mortal sins upon their souls. And a mortal sin is a deliberate defiance of God and His laws in grave matter in which the sinner knowingly and deliberately exclaims defiantly: “Non serviam!” “I will not serve!” ...And if the punishment were not eternal, then the worst criminal could for all eternity remain in defiance of God, knowing that in due time the punishment for his crime would cease. Therefore, it is man, not God, who creates an eternal punishment for himself. God merely permits it, in order not to frustrate the free will of man which makes man accountable for his good as well as his evil deeds.
 
Moreover, the Father judges no one, but has entrusted all judgment to the Son, that all may honor the Son just as they honor the Father. (John 5:22-23)

For as the Father has life in himself, so he has granted the Son also to have life in himself. And he has given him authority to judge because he is the Son of Man. Do not be amazed at this, for a time is coming when all who are in their graves will hear his voice and come out—those who have done what is good will rise to live, and those who have done what is evil will rise to be condemned. By myself I can do nothing; I judge only as I hear, and my judgment is just, for I seek not to please myself but him who sent me. (John 5:26-30)

For I tell you that unless your righteousness surpasses that of the Pharisees and the teachers of the law, you will certainly not enter the kingdom of heaven. (Matt 5:20)

But I tell you that anyone who is angry with a brother or sister will be subject to judgment... And anyone who says, ‘You fool!’ will be in danger of the fire of hell. (Matt 5:22)
 
Now I saw heaven opened, and behold, a white horse. And He who sat on him was called Faithful and True, and in righteousness He judges and makes war. His eyes were like a flame of fire, and on His head were many crowns. He had a name written that no one knew except Himself. He was clothed with a robe dipped in blood, and His name is called The Word of God. And the armies in heaven, clothed in fine linen, white and clean, followed Him on white horses. Now out of His mouth goes a sharp sword, that with it He should strike the nations. And He Himself will rule them with a rod of iron. He Himself treads the winepress of the fierceness and wrath of Almighty God. And He has on His robe and on His thigh a name written: KING OF KINGS AND LORD OF LORDS.
(Rev 19: 11-16)
 
ilostabet said:
This question of God’s mercy versus judgement seems to me to be a false dialectic. I made this post on the inspirational paintings thread about the oldest known icon of Christ.
....
Going back to the example of casting the first stone, Jesus still judges the woman, but shows her mercy at the same time. He saves her from earthly punishment but by saying ‘Go and sin no more’ he is at the same time imposing a heavy Heavenly judgement of her past actions and a clear instructions for future ones. In other words, His mercy and judgement cannot be separated.
I do not know anything about any dialectic or debate. All i said in my original post was this:
(new emphasis added)
I would like to share several Bible passages to remind us that, while God is loving and merciful, we are also admonished to fear Him, serve Him, and to fear his wrath and judgment:
Then i get this reaction:

So, be an Old Testament Jew, or the modern denominations they control. Ignore that it fills them with the Revolutionary Spirit of Satan, always ready to kill those they perceive as less Holy than them for God, and God, who is infinite love, disliking them enough to break the Old Covenant. Ignore the New Testament that Jesus comes to end the Law of Fear by revealing the fullness of God. See how well that works out for you.
 

Aboulia

Robin
ilostabet said:
This question of God’s mercy versus judgement seems to me to be a false dialectic. I made this post on the inspirational paintings thread about the oldest known icon of Christ.

ilostabet said:
The oldest known icon of Christ Pantocrator (6th Century):



When modern artists recreate it, they sometimes 'fix' the two different looks of Jesus in it, because they think the ancients were dumb and could not paint properly (a mistaken and perhaps malicious idea that came with the Renaissance). In fact, they meant to paint it this way and with a specific and important meaning.

They pictured two 'looks' to highlight the two natures of Christ, fully human and fully divine, Christ the Judge and Christ the Redeemer, and so on. If you use your hand and cover one side vs the other, you can see this clearly depicted.

Foolish moderns.

One of the most beautiful icons of Christ in my opinion, not just in itself, but in the subtlety of what is trying to convey. The ancients understood it instinctively - we need to regain that instinct.

Mirror image of each side:

[img=600x550]https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/f/f1/Composite_christ_pantocrator.png[/img]

There are more parallels that we can find by looking at it separately - you can see in the side that has the Scriptures, you could think of the heaviness of the Law, closed and pointing downward in a way, so much so that the book is closed (Jesus said not one iota would pass); but on the other side his whole being is open, pointing upward, the blessing hand. So both Law and Mercy are fullfilled, just like his reply to the farisees for whoever has not sinned to cast the first stone - the Law is kept, but so is Mercy.

You can see as well that the "compassionate side" is more uncovered, which is maybe why there is a tendency for the "hippie jesus" to prevail, because it's easier to see, but on the other hand the side of the Scriptures is clearly in the foreground, even if the other side is more exposed.
I was discussing there the fact that moderns often ‘correct’ the picture because they misunderstand what it is trying to convey, and I think the mercy vs judgement debate kind of does the same in verbal form.

There is a reason why they painted one icon of Christ with two aspects, instead of two icons with each having one aspect. They cannot be separated. They are the same thing. God’s light is an illuminating light for the faithful, but a blinding light to the faithless. And the same with his mercy and his judgement.

To the faithful the judgement is welcomed because we know it entails His mercy, when God judges us he is not merely exacting punishment, he is purifying us, cleansing us so we can be joined to Him.

To the faithless His mercy tastes like judgement, a judgement too harsh for them to bear, because they do not trust His mercy. It's easy to see for example that most atheists are not really just unbelievers, but reject and even hate God. And not just because He is judging them, but I think especially because they themselves judging this or that to be unforgivable see and don't understand that Jesus is still willing to forgive.

Going back to the example of casting the first stone, Jesus still judges the woman, but shows her mercy at the same time. He saves her from earthly punishment but by saying ‘Go and sin no more’ he is at the same time imposing a heavy Heavenly judgement of her past actions and a clear instructions for future ones. In other words, His mercy and judgement cannot be separated.
Just to point it out for those that don't yet grasp the depth of icons. You even see that in the icon itself, the side of mercy is the open hand that blesses, and the side of judgement, is the side of law, the book held close to the chest, which also corresponds to the facial expression on either side. Nothing in an icon is accidental.

Although I'm not too sure I'd agree with the statement, "It's easy to see for example that most atheists are not really just unbelievers, but reject and even hate God". I tend to believe that a lot of atheism stems from a lack of understanding of who God actually is, and from rejection of those who call themselves believers in God because they notice a difference in "Christians" between what they practice and preach.

@goodlife776 Fear is a healthy respect and understanding of what is going to happen if you do not change first your life, then your mind. We fear God in the same way we would fear living at the edge of a cliff. We don't live in terror, terror is an evil, but we do realize what will happen if we take it lightly. Take AB's words into context, The law of fear is the one that existed before the God descended from heaven and took flesh, it is one of condemnation, of what our punishment will be because we have transgressed. Before Christ, there was no guarantee of mercy for those that repent, but the parable of the labourers in the vineyard, and the parable of the prodigal son show this to be the case.

From the 51st homily of St Isaac the Syrian
A zealous man never achieves peace of mind; but he who is a stranger to peace is a stranger to joy. If, as it is said, peace of mind is perfect health, and zeal is opposed to peace, then the man who has a wrong zeal is sick with a grievous disease. Though you presume, O man, to send forth your zeal against the maladies of other men, you have expelled the health of your own soul; be assiduous, rather, in laboring for your own soul’s health. If you wish to heal the infirm, know that the sick are in greater need of loving care than of the rebuke. Therefore, although you do not help others, you expend labor to bring a grievous disease upon yourself. Zeal is not reckoned among men to be a form of wisdom, but as one of the maladies of the soul, namely narrow-mindedness and deep ignorance.

The beginning of divine wisdom is clemency and gentleness, which arises from greatness of soul and the bearing of the infirmities of men. For, it is said, ‘We that are strong ought to bear the infirmities of the weak’ (Rom. 15:1), and ‘Restore the transgressor in the spirit of meekness’ (Gal. 6:1). The Apostle numbers peace and patience among the fruits of the Spirit (Gal 5:22).
......
Justice does not belong to the Christian way of life, and there is no mention of it in Christ’s teaching. Rejoice with them that rejoice, and weep with them that weep; for this is the sign of limpid purity. Suffer with the sick, and mourn with sinners; with those who repent, rejoice.
 
From Saint Alphonsus De Ligouri:

(emphasis added)

The more we have experienced the patient mercies of God, the more we ought to be afraid of continuing to abuse them, lest the time of God's vengeance overtake us.

___

"Commit this sin; you can afterwards confess it." Such is the deceit with which the devil has drawn many souls into hell. Many Christians, now in hell, have been lost by this delusion. The Lord waits, that He may have mercy on you. God waits for the sinner, that the sinner may be converted, and obtain mercy; but when God sees that the time which he allows the sinner for doing penance is employed only in increasing the number of his offences, then he waits no longer, but punishes him as he deserves.

____

God is not mocked. Yet he would be mocked, if the sinner could go on continually offending him, and yet afterwards enjoy him in heaven. What things a man shall sow, those also shall he reap. He who sows good works shall reap rewards; but he who sows iniquities shall reap chastisements. The hope of those who commit sin because God is forgiving is an abomination in his sight: their hope, says holy Job, is an abomination.
 
Aboulia said:
ilostabet said:
This question of God’s mercy versus judgement seems to me to be a false dialectic. I made this post on the inspirational paintings thread about the oldest known icon of Christ.

ilostabet said:
The oldest known icon of Christ Pantocrator (6th Century):



When modern artists recreate it, they sometimes 'fix' the two different looks of Jesus in it, because they think the ancients were dumb and could not paint properly (a mistaken and perhaps malicious idea that came with the Renaissance). In fact, they meant to paint it this way and with a specific and important meaning.

They pictured two 'looks' to highlight the two natures of Christ, fully human and fully divine, Christ the Judge and Christ the Redeemer, and so on. If you use your hand and cover one side vs the other, you can see this clearly depicted.

Foolish moderns.

One of the most beautiful icons of Christ in my opinion, not just in itself, but in the subtlety of what is trying to convey. The ancients understood it instinctively - we need to regain that instinct.

Mirror image of each side:

[img=600x550]https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/f/f1/Composite_christ_pantocrator.png[/img]

There are more parallels that we can find by looking at it separately - you can see in the side that has the Scriptures, you could think of the heaviness of the Law, closed and pointing downward in a way, so much so that the book is closed (Jesus said not one iota would pass); but on the other side his whole being is open, pointing upward, the blessing hand. So both Law and Mercy are fullfilled, just like his reply to the farisees for whoever has not sinned to cast the first stone - the Law is kept, but so is Mercy.

You can see as well that the "compassionate side" is more uncovered, which is maybe why there is a tendency for the "hippie jesus" to prevail, because it's easier to see, but on the other hand the side of the Scriptures is clearly in the foreground, even if the other side is more exposed.
I was discussing there the fact that moderns often ‘correct’ the picture because they misunderstand what it is trying to convey, and I think the mercy vs judgement debate kind of does the same in verbal form.

There is a reason why they painted one icon of Christ with two aspects, instead of two icons with each having one aspect. They cannot be separated. They are the same thing. God’s light is an illuminating light for the faithful, but a blinding light to the faithless. And the same with his mercy and his judgement.

To the faithful the judgement is welcomed because we know it entails His mercy, when God judges us he is not merely exacting punishment, he is purifying us, cleansing us so we can be joined to Him.

To the faithless His mercy tastes like judgement, a judgement too harsh for them to bear, because they do not trust His mercy. It's easy to see for example that most atheists are not really just unbelievers, but reject and even hate God. And not just because He is judging them, but I think especially because they themselves judging this or that to be unforgivable see and don't understand that Jesus is still willing to forgive.

Going back to the example of casting the first stone, Jesus still judges the woman, but shows her mercy at the same time. He saves her from earthly punishment but by saying ‘Go and sin no more’ he is at the same time imposing a heavy Heavenly judgement of her past actions and a clear instructions for future ones. In other words, His mercy and judgement cannot be separated.
Just to point it out for those that don't yet grasp the depth of icons. You even see that in the icon itself, the side of mercy is the open hand that blesses, and the side of judgement, is the side of law, the book held close to the chest, which also corresponds to the facial expression on either side. Nothing in an icon is accidental.

Although I'm not too sure I'd agree with the statement, "It's easy to see for example that most atheists are not really just unbelievers, but reject and even hate God". I tend to believe that a lot of atheism stems from a lack of understanding of who God actually is, and from rejection of those who call themselves believers in God because they notice a difference in "Christians" between what they practice and preach.

@goodlife776 Fear is a healthy respect and understanding of what is going to happen if you do not change first your life, then your mind. We fear God in the same way we would fear living at the edge of a cliff. We don't live in terror, terror is an evil, but we do realize what will happen if we take it lightly. Take AB's words into context, The law of fear is the one that existed before the God descended from heaven and took flesh, it is one of condemnation, of what our punishment will be because we have transgressed. Before Christ, there was no guarantee of mercy for those that repent, but the parable of the labourers in the vineyard, and the parable of the prodigal son show this to be the case.

From the 51st homily of St Isaac the Syrian
A zealous man never achieves peace of mind; but he who is a stranger to peace is a stranger to joy. If, as it is said, peace of mind is perfect health, and zeal is opposed to peace, then the man who has a wrong zeal is sick with a grievous disease. Though you presume, O man, to send forth your zeal against the maladies of other men, you have expelled the health of your own soul; be assiduous, rather, in laboring for your own soul’s health. If you wish to heal the infirm, know that the sick are in greater need of loving care than of the rebuke. Therefore, although you do not help others, you expend labor to bring a grievous disease upon yourself. Zeal is not reckoned among men to be a form of wisdom, but as one of the maladies of the soul, namely narrow-mindedness and deep ignorance.

The beginning of divine wisdom is clemency and gentleness, which arises from greatness of soul and the bearing of the infirmities of men. For, it is said, ‘We that are strong ought to bear the infirmities of the weak’ (Rom. 15:1), and ‘Restore the transgressor in the spirit of meekness’ (Gal. 6:1). The Apostle numbers peace and patience among the fruits of the Spirit (Gal 5:22).
......
Justice does not belong to the Christian way of life, and there is no mention of it in Christ’s teaching. Rejoice with them that rejoice, and weep with them that weep; for this is the sign of limpid purity. Suffer with the sick, and mourn with sinners; with those who repent, rejoice.
Now I urge you, brethren, note those who cause divisions and offenses, contrary to the doctrine which you learned, and avoid them. For those who are such do not serve our Lord Jesus Christ, but their own belly, and by smooth words and flattering speech deceive the hearts of the simple. (Romans 16:17-18)

For the time will come when they will not endure sound doctrine, but according to their own desires, because they have itching ears, they will heap up for themselves teachers; and they will turn their ears away from the truth, and be turned aside to fables. (2 Tim 4:3-4)

But avoid foolish disputes, genealogies, contentions, and strivings about the law; for they are unprofitable and useless. (Titus 3:9)

For I say, through the grace given to me, to everyone who is among you, not to think of himself more highly than he ought to think, but to think soberly, as God has dealt to each one a measure of faith. (Romans 12:3)
 
From Saint Alphonsus De Ligouri:

We commit sins, and we take no notice of the load of guilt which we are accumulating; but let us tremble lest what happened to King Balthasar befall us also: You are weighed in the balance, and are found wanting.
_____

The devil may tell you that it matters not whether it be ten or eleven sins. But no, that wicked enemy deceives you; the sin which he is tempting you to commit will increase the load of your guilt; it may decide the balance of divine justice against you, and you may be condemned for it to the torments of hell. If, O Christian, you live not in fear that God will not show you mercy, should you add one more mortal sin to those which you have already committed; if you tremble not at the thought of this, you are in great danger of being lost.
 
From Saint Alphonsus De Ligouri:

The approach of death, therefore, is terrible to those only who have thought of nothing but of gratifying themselves during their lifetime, and have never thought of their last end; but it is not terrible to those who, by frequently thinking upon it, have learned to despise all earthly goods, and to love nothing but God.
_____

We would have cured Babylon, but she is not healed; let us forsake her. (Jer. 51. 9) The physician visits the sick man, prescribes remedies for him, and makes him sensible of his maladies; but when he sees that his patient does not obey him, and on this account grows worse and worse, he takes leave of him and forsakes him. It is thus that God deals with obstinate sinners: after a certain time he speaks but little to them; and only assists them with grace just sufficient to enable them to save their souls; but they will not save them. The darkness of their minds, the hardness of their hearts, and the inveteracy of their wicked habits, render it morally impossible for them to gain salvation.
_____

How is it, writes Salvian, that men believe in death, judgment, hell, and eternity, and yet live without fearing them? Hell is believed, and yet how many go down there! But, O God! while these truths are believed, they are not dwelt upon, and from this are so many souls lost.
____

Oh! if all persons would but think of death, in which everything must be relinquished; of judgment, in which an account must be given of our whole lives; of a happy or miserable eternity, which must be the lot of each one : if all did but provide for these last things of their lives, no one would be lost.
 
Serve the LORD with fear and celebrate his rule with trembling. Kiss his son, or he will be angry and you and your ways will be destroyed, for his wrath can flare up in a moment. (Psalm 1:11-12)

The LORD reigns forever; he has established his throne for judgment. He rules the world in righteousness and judges the peoples with equity. (Psalm 9:7-8)

The LORD examines the righteous, but the wicked, those who love violence, he hates with a passion. On the wicked he will rain fiery coals and burning sulfur; a scorching wind will be their lot. For the LORD is righteous, he loves justice; the upright will see his face. (Psalms 11:5-7)

But I tell you that people will have to give account on the day of judgment for every empty word they have spoken. For by your words you will be acquitted, and by your words you will be condemned. (Matt 12:36-37)

For the Son of Man is going to come in his Father’s glory with his angels, and then he will reward everyone according to what they have done. (Matt 16:27)
 
Some passages on Jesus' comments on the Scriptures:

It is written in the Prophets: ‘They will all be taught by God.’ Everyone who has heard the Father and learned from him comes to me. (John 6:45)

Has not Moses given you the law? Yet not one of you keeps the law. (John 7:19)

Then Jesus said to the crowds and to his disciples: "The teachers of the law and the Pharisees sit in Moses’ seat. So you must be careful to do everything they tell you. But do not do what they do, for they do not practice what they preach......Everything they do is done for people to see..." (Matt 23:1-3,5)

If he called them ‘gods,’ to whom the word of God came—and Scripture cannot be broken— what about the one whom the Father set apart as his very own and sent into the world? (John 10:35-36)

Jesus replied. “There is only One who is good. If you want to enter life, keep the commandments.”"Which ones?” he inquired. Jesus replied, “ ‘You shall not murder, you shall not commit adultery, you shall not steal, you shall not give false testimony, honor your father and mother,’ i and ‘love your neighbor as yourself.’” (Matt 19:17-19)
Some passages saying that Jesus fulfills the Scriptures:

Even after Jesus had performed so many signs in their presence, they still would not believe in him. This was to fulfill the word of Isaiah the prophet...Isaiah said this because he saw Jesus’ glory and spoke about him. (John 12:37-38,41)

Jesus found a young donkey and sat on it, as it is written: "Do not be afraid, Daughter Zion; see, your king is coming, seated on a donkey’s colt.” At first his disciples did not understand all this. Only after Jesus was glorified did they realize that these things had been written about him... (John 12:14-16)

This was to fulfill what was spoken through the prophet Isaiah: "He took up our infirmities and bore our diseases." (Matt 8:17)
 
I do all I can to keep myself busy throughout the day. I have cried. I pray. But that lingering feeling always comes to haunt me when my body is too tired to do anything, so the mind also gives in. I recover after sleeping. But right now, I'm feeling helpless.

Why do I have to wait for someone else to take some action when I can only control my own actions?

I fear this feeling of dependence and attachment will not go away.

Thank You.
 

infowarrior1

Hummingbird
ilostabet said:
Going back to the example of casting the first stone, Jesus still judges the woman, but shows her mercy at the same time. He saves her from earthly punishment but by saying ‘Go and sin no more’ he is at the same time imposing a heavy Heavenly judgement of her past actions and a clear instructions for future ones. In other words, His mercy and judgement cannot be separated.
The Cross is how God was able to forgive and redeem us and by extension all of the corrupted Cosmos.

The Cross is also an instrument of Judgment. An instrument of the death penalty.

Jesus experienced the "Second Death" on the Cross during the 3 hours of darkness there. He experienced the entire Judgment for our sins.

We were punished in him, we died in him and we were raised in him.

The Cross reconciled Justice and Mercy in one. And the Cross shows the inseparability of Mercy and Wrath.

God had mercy on us because he had wrath on us in Jesus. We paid for our crimes in Christ. And by the innocent death of Christ had his Innocence attributed to us.

Infinity/0=0

Hence why we are able to be rewarded for our good deeds in service to God.
 

Paracelsus

Crow
Gold Member
Mayhem said:
I do all I can to keep myself busy throughout the day. I have cried. I pray. But that lingering feeling always comes to haunt me when my body is too tired to do anything, so the mind also gives in. I recover after sleeping. But right now, I'm feeling helpless.

Why do I have to wait for someone else to take some action when I can only control my own actions?

I fear this feeling of dependence and attachment will not go away.

Thank You.
Sin requires the full consent of the will; habit is well understood to abrogate culpability. Prayer, persistence, and time are all that can help. Above all, remember you are human, like me, like everyone else here - we have a fallen nature, thanks to Adam's original sin, but we are redeemed by the love of God. And remember: for God, all things are possible. Seek first the graces required for eternal life, ask with confidence, and give thanks once you have for God listening. And remember lastly that he answers in his time - not man's - and he does not always answer 'Yes'.
 
Paracelsus said:
Mayhem said:
I do all I can to keep myself busy throughout the day. I have cried. I pray. But that lingering feeling always comes to haunt me when my body is too tired to do anything, so the mind also gives in. I recover after sleeping. But right now, I'm feeling helpless.

Why do I have to wait for someone else to take some action when I can only control my own actions?

I fear this feeling of dependence and attachment will not go away.

Thank You.
Sin requires the full consent of the will; habit is well understood to abrogate culpability. Prayer, persistence, and time are all that can help. Above all, remember you are human, like me, like everyone else here - we have a fallen nature, thanks to Adam's original sin, but we are redeemed by the love of God. And remember: for God, all things are possible. Seek first the graces required for eternal life, ask with confidence, and give thanks once you have for God listening. And remember lastly that he answers in his time - not man's - and he does not always answer 'Yes'.
I was told no and, given an unbearably painful gift for my prayers. Am I allowed to not accept it, at least?
 

Paracelsus

Crow
Gold Member
Mayhem said:
Paracelsus said:
Mayhem said:
I do all I can to keep myself busy throughout the day. I have cried. I pray. But that lingering feeling always comes to haunt me when my body is too tired to do anything, so the mind also gives in. I recover after sleeping. But right now, I'm feeling helpless.

Why do I have to wait for someone else to take some action when I can only control my own actions?

I fear this feeling of dependence and attachment will not go away.

Thank You.
Sin requires the full consent of the will; habit is well understood to abrogate culpability. Prayer, persistence, and time are all that can help. Above all, remember you are human, like me, like everyone else here - we have a fallen nature, thanks to Adam's original sin, but we are redeemed by the love of God. And remember: for God, all things are possible. Seek first the graces required for eternal life, ask with confidence, and give thanks once you have for God listening. And remember lastly that he answers in his time - not man's - and he does not always answer 'Yes'.
I was told no and, given an unbearably painful gift for my prayers. Am I allowed to not accept it, at least?
I think you need to be a bit more precise about what your prayer was, why you're seeking it, and what exactly the problem you're having is.
 
I'm sorry,

Age old, It is about one unrequited love and I don't know what more to say. I'm trying hard to move on after letting her go but time is merciless.

Then I have a tendency to interconnect my prayers and make it more difficult on myself.

Thank you.
 

Paracelsus

Crow
Gold Member
I'm no confessor, brother, so it might be worth consulting a priest or pastor of your denomination at this point. I can tell you I know unrequited love. The only consolation I can give you is that it does pass, in time, and one of the ways to do so is to not think about it.

EDIT: Also, if you wouldn't mind, please don't use me as the source of that quote in your signature. The source is Christ; specifically, the Gospel of Matthew 19:26. Please use that as your source, not me.
 
Paracelsus said:
I'm no confessor, brother, so it might be worth consulting a priest or pastor of your denomination at this point. I can tell you I know unrequited love. The only consolation I can give you is that it does pass, in time, and one of the ways to do so is to not think about it.

EDIT: Also, if you wouldn't mind, please don't use me as the source of that quote in your signature. The source is Christ; specifically, the Gospel of Matthew 19:26. Please use that as your source, not me.
Okay, I should not have gotten carried away by my emotions.

I'll be a better person.

Thank You.

Edit 1: And, I will be more careful next time.

Edit 2: I took notes from this interaction, they will be helpful for my mental growth. Thank you again for this opportunity.
 
Paracelsus said:
I'm no confessor, brother, so it might be worth consulting a priest or pastor of your denomination at this point.
I pray, God, will send me a priest on his on own 'time'. I will patiently wait.

Thank You.
 
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