The God pill

You can never pray too much. I find myself most at peace when my prayers are consistent and more distressed when there not. The devil wants us to be focused on this world instead of God. Once we remember God is in control even when we see "bad things"( there not bad in the grand scheme we just don't understand God's infinite wisdom) we will not go through the emotional roller coaster of those with no faith. Ease or hardship both are tests and both should draw us near to Him.
 

AnonymousBosch

Crow
Gold Member
I gave into temptation and lost. Even as interiorly, my conscience and perhaps my guardian angel + the Holy Ghost is screaming at me to get back on the right path, the evil one is battering me with the opposite errors of presumption and despair and even greater temptations still. It really feels like being under a black magic spell. I am in danger.

I would suggest worrying about presumption after you've sinned is like focusing on fiddling with the safety switch on a gun after you've already shot yourself in the foot.

Let's see if I can explain High Level Catholic Mystic thought (St Catherine of Siena, Bl Julian of Norwich, St Faustina, St Therese of Lisieux) in a simple fashion.

Firstly: stay calm. Yes, you've been wounded by sin. This is a natural part of the journey of the soul towards the Father. This is part of the process of undoing original sin in you - He doesn't will you sin, but, when you naturally choose evil, He isn't interested in punishing you or condemning you, He is only interested in using your free-willed fall to make you better than you were before you fell.

The punishment for sin doesn't come from God. The punishment for sin is subjecting ourselves to an incredibly-painful level of self-scrutiny.

Bl Julian of Norwich:

Sin is the sharpest scourge with which any chosen soul can be struck, which scourge belabours man or woman, and breaks a man, and purges [or 'makes despicable'] a man in his own sight so much that at times he thinks himself that he is not fit for anything but as it were to sink into hell...

It's hugely-important to understand this: the battle isn't God versus the Soul - he has no desire to cast us into Hell - but the Soul against itself, inflamed by the Devil's suggestions.

The battle here is not God's Wrath - he is perfect love - but the wrath that exists within ourselves, particularly, our nature to desire to condemn others or ourselves to Hell, believing the punishment is just.

Here's the writer Grace Jansen discussing Julian's thought:

Julian insists that there is no wrath in God: the wrath is in us, when we choose to separate ourselves from Him. God does not blame us for our sins; he sees the frailty of our nature and our fractured contrariness, and recognizes that sin is both a consequence and an augmentation of our brokenness. He long to help and heal us; he is not angry with us nor does he with to punish us. She puts this in very strong terms: she says there is a sense in which it is inaccurate to speak of God forgiving us for our sins, because to forgive presupposes that there must be something needing to be forgiven, and God does not look upon us in that way. Rather, He sees us as perfect in Christ, our substance entirely united with Him, and longs to unify our sensuality with our substance so that those things which we rightly consider to be sinful will plague and destroy us no longer.

I've spoken of this 'Freedom for Excellence' mode of viewing God at length before, a while back, and this matches my experiential knowledge of God over the last few years. God wants to take us on a journey and heal all that is broken in us that drives us to sin, and he's very compassionate and patient during this - for us - very painful process of showing us the falsehood of every worldly judgment we've ever made in our lives, through which we learn our pettiness, smallness and stupidity, and so, see the increasing wisdom in truly handing our lives over to God. As a bonus, rather than nursing any belief that we are superior to the 'unsaved' willful sinner, we very much realise that the potential exists for them to be us, (and more humbling), for us to be them.

For example, one of the most humbling experiences I went through a few weeks back was to tell my Father about my child abuse - whom I'd perceived as distant and cruel as a Child - and to ask his forgiveness if I ever made him feel unloved or unwanted during my childhood since I wasn't capable after that of showing love to anyone, and since my Mother and Sister were both similarly-abused, that I understood why His loneliness might have made him seek out a family to replace us with.

I spent years thinking he was a Monster and expecting an apology from Him. Instead, I owed Him an apology, because I didn't know the full truth of the situation. The world is not black and white, and the Spiritual Reality is incredibly-complex.

This is why God isn't quick to condemn. Julian again:

I saw truly that our Lord was never angry, and never will be. Because He is God, He is good, he is truth, he is love, he is peace; and his power, his wisdom, his charity and his unity do not allow him to be angry. For I saw truly that is against the property of his power to be angry, and against the property of his wisdom and the property of his goodness. God is the goodness which can never be angry, for God is nothing but goodness.

I used to struggle with the Old Testament until I learnt more about what St Thomas calls 'the Mode of the Receiver'. The Old Testament is the Jewish Cultural understanding and interpretation of events, and, culturally, they're unreliable narrators, huge exaggerators and racial supremacists. Look up at what Israeli Rabbis are saying about their bombing of Beirut as being "God's Punishment". They haven't changed, thousands of years later.

God doesn't get angry with us. We get angry and frustrated with ourselves.

For I saw no wrath except on man's side, and he forgives that in us, for wrath is nothing else but a perversity and a lack of opposition to peace and love. And it comes from a lack of power or a lack of wisdom or a lack of goodness, and this lack is not in God, but it is on our side. For we through sin and wretchedness have in us a wrath and a constant opposition to peace and to love... But yet in all this the sweet eye of pity is never turned away from us, and the operation of mercy does not cease.

I can relate to what Julian is saying here. I remember how initially quiet things were when I stopped constantly sinning, and how much downtime I had when I wasn't lining up multiple women a day for sex. There was stillness and silence and it was hugely disconcerting to me, initially, and I remember, even 18 months later, God saying to me "Why is it so hard for you to accept peace?" Also understanding that peace also meant 'my love'. I've come a long way in that time, I can go days on end in a calm state, but, now and then, it's like my very body rebels and I wish for, I guess, spiritual turmoil, like it's what I deserve.

I understand that this is the main battle I have to fight throughout my life: the belief that I deserve Hell for my past rather than God's love, whose mercy is far grander than - to his eyes - my petty little sins.

So, ChainsofPeter, try and step back and look at your injury from a distance. What's really happened?

- Did you think you should have been stronger or better than you were?

Then you now have greater knowledge of your genuine weakness.

- Did you think you were holier than you actually turned out to be?

Then you now have greater knowledge of your true need for humility.

- Do you think what you chose to do is so important as to be beyond God's power to forgive you for it?

Then you now have greater knowledge of the greatness of His mercy.

- Do you think you 'deserve' punishment and that God is somehow wrong for offering you forgiveness, regardless?

Then you now have greater knowledge of his loving desire to heal you from sin.

And in all of these cases, you have greater knowledge of why you need God to save you from yourself. Chin up.

A lot of what we go through during the painful self-scrutiny of sin is really a twisted form of pride, and it has to be unlearnt. Because what we are effectively doing in this moment is standing in court, arguing with our Judge for a harsher sentence? Who does this in the physical world?

Ignore what the Devil is telling you. He's a liar. All he wants to do is extend the pain of you looking into yourself, so you forget God is waiting for you to return to Him. During this, you're not focused on drawing closer to God, but are instinctively pushing yourself away from Him, which is also what the Devil wants. So, ignore him, get to confession. If you're worried about what the Priests 'think' of your sins, well, this is another trap of pride to make you draw out the process: they've heard it all. The battle when you've fallen is simply to admit, yeah, I really am no better than this, and humble yourself to go and formally-apologize to God. Nothing is gained by putting it off fearing a worse fall or a stronger temptation. Every time you confess, you gain more grace.

What God doesn't want is for you to be injured in battle, and lie bleeding out on the field, thinking you don't 'deserve' the medical treatment he's aching to give you.
 
@AnonymousBosch the temptation this week was intense but when I look back at it, I forget what, exactly, the temptation was but once I commit the first sin, I created an avalanche of other sins.

I would have thought that with the Church being persecuted by Her own clerics, that that would be a shocker that would keep me sober minded and on my toes regarding my spiritual life. I had even completed a First Friday three days before the fall. But nope. When that temptation was not resisted, I became a sinner of the sort of sins that I had already reasoned my way out of through many disappointments.

A fellow parishioner contacted me a few days ago to see how I was doing. I described the situation and he asked me "what is it I fear." I replied "damnation" but I think he was trying to get me to think more specifically about my situation.

I know the cure for this situation is Confession, but I've been hesitant to do so for the following reasons: first, embarrassment at confessing the same things to the same priest (he's SSPX), and second, I can't say that I have true contrition. (When I mentioned presumption upthread, I mean that after the first set of sins, I would justify to myself further sins not yet committed). I'm in this odd situation that I am at once a child of Hell but desiring not to further offend Christ's glory. I think though, that God is finding ways to shake me out of this spell because He realizes I can't do it by my own power.
 

AnonymousBosch

Crow
Gold Member
@AnonymousBosch the temptation this week was intense but when I look back at it, I forget what, exactly, the temptation was but once I commit the first sin, I created an avalanche of other sins.

I would have thought that with the Church being persecuted by Her own clerics, that that would be a shocker that would keep me sober minded and on my toes regarding my spiritual life. I had even completed a First Friday three days before the fall. But nope. When that temptation was not resisted, I became a sinner of the sort of sins that I had already reasoned my way out of through many disappointments.

A fellow parishioner contacted me a few days ago to see how I was doing. I described the situation and he asked me "what is it I fear." I replied "damnation" but I think he was trying to get me to think more specifically about my situation.

I know the cure for this situation is Confession, but I've been hesitant to do so for the following reasons: first, embarrassment at confessing the same things to the same priest (he's SSPX), and second, I can't say that I have true contrition. (When I mentioned presumption upthread, I mean that after the first set of sins, I would justify to myself further sins not yet committed). I'm in this odd situation that I am at once a child of Hell but desiring not to further offend Christ's glory. I think though, that God is finding ways to shake me out of this spell because He realizes I can't do it by my own power.

@Chains of Peter

I would recommend confession, regardless. Once the demons have an open door, they start messing with us, and we start evidencing the kind of demonic doublethink you're describing: you're at once terrified of damnation, but similarly terrified of offending God by doing what you're told to do to avoid damnation. I've read multiple spiritual directors suggest not to worry about questions of perfect contrition when people are scrupulous in this manner, and to just get the graces from confession that will remove this fuzzy, confused mental state. God will forgive you. St Teresa of Avila suggests there are two other ways the Devil agitates us beyond tempting us with sin: 1) getting us upset enough that we neglect our prayer and sacramental life; and 2) by lowering our opinion of God's goodness.

You might prone to scruples, so I'd give this a read.

https://scrupulousanonymous.org/wp-.../Ten_Commandments_for_the_Scrupulous_2013.pdf

With your Priest, if you think confessing to Him will lower his opinion of you, great. You should want to be counted as despicable amongst men, because this humility is a great protection from the Devil. So, if you find the experience humiliating, offer your humiliation up to God for your spiritual advancement. There was a period where I regularly saw a Priest who had a very low opinion of me for confession, and learning to not justify my behaviour and using his hatred of me to humble myself resulted in fantastic spiritual gains.

I'd strongly advise confessing this fear of humiliation to your Priest. Every sin and spiritual issue confessed to your confessor frustrates the demonic, as per St Ignatius' 13th Rule for Spiritual Discernment:

Thirteenth Rule. The thirteenth: Likewise, he acts as a licentious lover in wanting to be secret and not revealed. For, as the licentious man who, speaking for an evil purpose, solicits a daughter of a good father or a wife of a good husband, wants his words and persuasions to be secret, and the contrary displeases him much, when the daughter reveals to her father or the wife to her husband his licentious words and depraved intention, because he easily gathers that he will not be able to succeed with the undertaking begun: in the same way, when the enemy of human nature brings his wiles and persuasions to the just soul, he wants and desires that they be received and kept in secret; but when one reveals them to his good Confessor or to another spiritual person that knows his deceits and evil ends, it is very grievous to him, because he gathers, from his manifest deceits being discovered, that he will not be able to succeed with his wickedness begun.

So, talk about the issue, like a man.

And yes, God wants you to learn that you are weak, so that you always turn to him. You have to learn to be resolute in your pursuit of him, which means, yes, you will fall many, many times, but just get right back up, get to confession, place your trust in Him, and try again. All the Saints were fully aware of their weakness, and spoke of how they could do nothing good under their own power. It's not false modesty. I originally found this idea confronting at the beginning of my spiritual journey. Now? It's the truth. We all are weak, fallen creatures, and, as Blessed Julian of Norwich suggested in my last post on the subject: he expects us to be weak, which allows him to be our strength. God is a Good Father. The Old Law passed away. We are not in a Master / Slave relationship but Father / Children.

This 'get back on the horse' after a fall theme, I've seen repeated by various Classic Spiritual Writers in the last few days, and this is all long before Vatican II.

Father Augustine Baker, author of 'Sancta Sophia':

Let, then, nothing deter the soul from persevering faithfully in her resolution. No, let not even the sight of her daily defects, imperfections, or sins dishearten her; but let her be encouraged even from her falls, and from the experience of her own weakness, to run more eagerly and to adhere more firmly to God, by whom she will be enabled to overcome all obstacles.

Walter Hilton, author of 'The Scale of Perfection':

But if it should happen sometimes, as likely it will, that through some of these temptations and thy own frailty, thou stumble and perhaps fall down, and get some harm thereby, or that thou for some time be turned a little out of the way, as soon as possibly may be, come again to thyself and get up again and return to the right way, using such remedies for thy hurt as the Church ordains. And do not trouble thyself overmuch or long with thinking unquietly on thy past misfortunes and pain; abide not in such thoughts, for that will do thee more harm, and give advantage to thy enemies. Therefore, make haste to go on in thy trevail, and work again, as if nothing had happened.

You have to remember, God is very, very good, and it gives him great joy to forgive us:

St Teresa of Avila, Universal Doctor of the Church in 'The Way of Perfection', speaking on the Phrase 'Our Father':

O Son of God and my Lord! How is it that you give so much all together in first words? Since you humble Yourself to such an extreme in joining with us in prayer and making Yourself the Brother of creatures so lowly and wretched, how it is that You give us in the name of Your Father everything that can be given? For You desire that He consider us His children, because Your word cannot fail. You oblige Him to be true to Your word, which is no small burden since in being Father he must bear with us no matter how serious the offenses. If we return to Him like the prodigal son, He has to pardon us. He has to console us in our trials. He has to sustain us in the way a Father like this must. For, in effect, He must be better than all the fathers in the world because in Him everything must be faultless. And after all this He must make us sharers and heirs with you.

I'd also highly recommend this episode of this podcast series on Ven Bruno Lanteri: "Refuse to Accept Discouragement". His motto was 'Begin again.'

https://www.discerninghearts.com/ca...en-bruno-lanteri-with-fr-timothy-gallagher-2/

From the episode description:

He speaks of what is at the heart of what turns discouragement into hope – that it is very important to have a deep sense of the goodness of God. Ven. Lanteri encourages all of us even today to recall God’s mercy, faithfulness, and love in the circumstances and challenges found in the context of our vocation, whether in the married, single, or religious life. Order in our spiritual practice, used in a flexible manner, is essential to living out our vocation.

So, hang in there mate. Yes, it's humiliating to realise we still choose sin at times. A common trick of the demons is discouragement: to make you think your current state is your permanent, fixed state. So, ignore any self-condemnations that you 'don't deserve forgiveness'. Trust in God's mercy. Just get to confession, and begin again. As many times as it takes. Be resolute. You'll gradually find God works with you to rid yourself of the issues that holds you back, particularly the more attention you choose to pay attention to him rather than the world.

God bless.
 
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Lazuli Waves

Woodpecker
Speaking as somebody whose alcohol intake is limited to about one glass of wine or apple cider per month...

The Bible doesn't prohibit alcohol but encourages moderation in this (as in all appetites.) I would suggest you read the book of Proverbs, which has a lot to say about this subject that offers helpful guidelines for handling your appetites.

Alcoholic beverages are much stronger in modern times than in the ancient world, so it took some intentional effort to get drunk, especially in the Jewish world, where drunkenness was frowned upon. A total prohibition on alcohol is a very Puritan sort of approach that didn't exist before a few hundred years ago, and can often cause more harm than good as it sets up alcohol as a "forbidden fruit" that, say, teenagers will be drawn toward. There's definitely a middle ground between prohibition and drunkenness.

I suggest you read 1 Corinthians 8; though it specifically discusses meat offered to idols, substitute that with alcohol and you'll get a handle on the Bible's teaching in regards to helping others not stumble in areas of weakness. Sure, Christians don't always do a great job of this, but I don't think you should dismiss the entire faith just because sometimes Christians get drunk.



I have to say, of all the things in the Bible to get mad about, the wedding at Cana is a new one for me.

The wedding miracle is meant to evoke the creation of Man and Woman in Genesis, as Jesus' miracle blesses the wedding and marriage in general. It also illustrates (from an Orthodox or Catholic perspective) Mary's ability to intercede to Jesus on behalf of others. By making wine, Jesus is showing grace in a significant way; not having wine would have been a major faux pas and source of shame for the host whose responsibility was to provide for his guests, even at a celebration continuing several days. On top of that, wine was usually watered down with 2-3 parts water, one part wine, so it was a good deal less potent that what we drink today.

Everything you said is just an opinion. There's a scholar who specializes in ancient alcohol, and he says they watered down some wines, but not the best. There are others say that wine was not watered down during that time, but before in Ancient Greek and Roman cultures.

"I have to say, of all the things in the Bible to get mad about, the wedding at Cana is a new one for me."

Yes, I am mad at the possibility that a holy book features pregnant women drinking alcohol. You don't know that the alcohol was watered down, especially if it was "the best wine." This isn't new. Muslims wouldn't

The major versions of Christianity can't even agree on what constitutes "The Bible." The different versions of the Bible all have errors. People are said to be an age at one point, then a different age at another. It's been edited and spliced together from different sources. Everyone particular person interprets it differently. The major churches change their opinions over time, church fathers and saints disagree on things.
 

Hermetic Seal

Kingfisher
Gold Member
Getting all angry about a completely speculative situation with nothing actually in the text to evidence what you're getting upset about suggests that you're just using this as an excuse for a more deep-seated anger over God and the Bible. Your objections over alcohol make you sound like a Muslim looking for excuses to get mad at what Christians believe. You also didn't address at all my scriptural references, instead retorting with "that's just your opinion, man!"

You don't sound like you really want any answers or explanations. You sound like you're repeating objections you've read from somewhere else which might as well be right off of the New Atheist Bingo Card. For complaints about supposed contradictions and textual issues, see Christian Think Tank's Common Objections Page.

There are basically two opinions on what constitutes the canon: the Catholic and Orthodox one (which includes the deuterocanonical books) and the Protestant one (which doesn't.) And those apocryphal books are mostly ancillary and aren't heavily referenced either way. So that's a grand total of two versions of the canon (excluding heretical sects like Mormons and Jehovah's Witnesses.)

Catholics and Orthodox would agree with the problems of personal, subjective interpretation, constant ideological drift is pretty much a Protestant phenomenon, and the core of tradition of Patristic Consensus comes from what the Church Fathers share in common rather than disagreements over tertiary issues. None of these are intractable or dealbreaking issues.
 

Wutang

Hummingbird
Gold Member
Not sure where to post this, but Roger Stone is speaking at a church on August 30 where he's talking about recommitting to his faith. I had no idea he was even a Christian at any point.


Stone will tell his story about re-committing himself as a Christian at a Mt. Juliet church on Aug. 30, amid being convicted in an investigation of collusion to protect the president's campaign only to be pardoned in July.

"I was unfairly persecuted by a politically motivated prosecutor during that period," Stone said. "I prayed to God to deliver me from persecutors during that period. I was reborn as a Christian.

"I was raised a Catholic and admit I fell away ... Now I want to talk about it because no matter what your problem is, God can deliver you too."
 

infowarrior1

Hummingbird
Getting all angry about a completely speculative situation with nothing actually in the text to evidence what you're getting upset about suggests that you're just using this as an excuse for a more deep-seated anger over God and the Bible. Your objections over alcohol make you sound like a Muslim looking for excuses to get mad at what Christians believe. You also didn't address at all my scriptural references, instead retorting with "that's just your opinion, man!"

You don't sound like you really want any answers or explanations. You sound like you're repeating objections you've read from somewhere else which might as well be right off of the New Atheist Bingo Card. For complaints about supposed contradictions and textual issues, see Christian Think Tank's Common Objections Page.

There are basically two opinions on what constitutes the canon: the Catholic and Orthodox one (which includes the deuterocanonical books) and the Protestant one (which doesn't.) And those apocryphal books are mostly ancillary and aren't heavily referenced either way. So that's a grand total of two versions of the canon (excluding heretical sects like Mormons and Jehovah's Witnesses.)

Catholics and Orthodox would agree with the problems of personal, subjective interpretation, constant ideological drift is pretty much a Protestant phenomenon, and the core of tradition of Patristic Consensus comes from what the Church Fathers share in common rather than disagreements over tertiary issues. None of these are intractable or dealbreaking issues.

Also just be aware that he is completely unbiblical in regards to women:



Those are his sources:

Feminism and the Bible, Mardi Keyes, IVP: 1995. [This small booklet is the best thing I have read on this subject! Outstanding work...I recommend it to all thoughtful folk.]

[*]Apology to Women: Christian Images of the Female Sex, Ann Brown,IVP: 1991. (The best book I have seen on this subject.)

[*]Woman in the Bible by Mary J. Evans, IVP:1983.

[*]A Dictionary of Women in Church History, Mary L. Hammack, Moody:1984. [Incredible book--lists snapshot bios of outstanding extra-biblical women, by period: Ancient Church History (ad 33-590, 47 entries), Medieval (ad 590-1500, 50 entries), Reformation (ad 1500-1650, 70 entries), Expansion and Denominationalism (ad 1650-1800, 80 entries), Revivals, Missions, Further Expansion (ad 1800-present, 580 entries).]

[*]Essays on Women in Earliest Christianity, volume 1, Carroll Osburn (eds), College Press: 1993.

He plays word games with the Greek when it comes to this subject. Beware.

Catholics and Orthodox would agree with the problems of personal, subjective interpretation, constant ideological drift is pretty much a Protestant phenomenon, and the core of tradition of Patristic Consensus comes from what the Church Fathers share in common rather than disagreements over tertiary issues. None of these are intractable or dealbreaking issues.

A lot of the problems is especially true because of the lack of proper Gatekeeping. Lots of False Teachers can pretend to be Orthodox until they end up in positions of power and put all their cronies in the Right Places before turning the Church Apostate.

Sure Patristic Consensus is good. However that doesn't necessarily stop the Termites that has managed to penetrate the top levels of the Vatican itself for example.
 

ginsu

Woodpecker

I really don't understand the thought that lifting or working out is for the ego/materialism. It is like that with people who are fully immersed in modern life, constantly on the phone and thinking about aquiring more sex. But if you have moved past that its actually a good way to transcend your own body and like a meditation. It requires complete focus or risk injury. Why did god give us the potential to become more fit/strong/attractive if he didn't want us to strive for this. I think its a beautiful pursuit to until the end of your time try to strive to keep your body in the best state possible and yes this also means aesthetically there is nothing wrong with looking good and strong, its inspiring. And after each workout i feel cleansed.

I understand that this is because we are designed to do hard manual labour around the farm, or to hunt and gather food. The lifting weights is just the best cope of modern life until you can become a homesteader/hunter.
 
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I'm listening to a podcast where someone is saying that when you pray for something God keeps you waiting partly so that things will get worse before He steps in, in order to test your faith. But what if right from the start you have no doubts at all? Will He still keep you waiting or will He be so pleased with your faith that He delivers the goods right away?
 

gework

Ostrich
Gold Member
 
I don't think it's a coincidence that the more active I became, the more religious I became.

It wasn't until I did a few powerlifting meets that St. Paul's athletic references in the New Testament started to make sense to me. When you're chasing a trophy, it works it's way into every decision you make. You're careful about what you eat, how much you sleep, what kind of activities you do before the most important workouts, being consistent with a gym schedule, etc.

It made me realize that this is how I should have been approaching religion my whole life: making each choice based on whether it would take me closer to God or further away from him. And there are so many obvious parallels: fasting is like dieting, a prayer rule is like a workout schedule.

I don't train seriously anymore, just do a bit of stone lifting and other activities that I enjoy, but those lessons stayed with me.
 

bomp

Pigeon
RCIA introductory meeting at the local parish is in two days. I haven't registered and am still being indecisive. Does the fact that I don't feel an overwhelming urgency imply that I'm not ready? I don't think it would be ideal to just keep reading Christian books indefinitely, but years of being a NEET pulls me in that direction and the memevirus precautions are offputting.
 

redbeard

Hummingbird
Moderator
RCIA introductory meeting at the local parish is in two days. I haven't registered and am still being indecisive. Does the fact that I don't feel an overwhelming urgency imply that I'm not ready? I don't think it would be ideal to just keep reading Christian books indefinitely, but years of being a NEET pulls me in that direction and the memevirus precautions are offputting.
With most RCIA classes, signing up for the class doesn't mandate that you MUST receive the sacraments or else. I know people who have done RCIA twice just because they weren't ready the first time. I definitely recommend going, even if at least to check it out.

The better question is, how do you feel about that specific parish? Have you been attending regularly? If this is a church you want to belong to, go for it.
 
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