The God pill

Aurini

Ostrich
Leonard D Neubache said:
I don't understand the need so many people have to sort of deify people like Jones or Peterson or Owen Benjamin.

Ah, that eternal need for the summer king. Raise him up to be a deity - then execute him when the good times are over. This is why Jesus had to die on the cross: somebody had to. Only His sacrifice was pure enough; all of the Britney Spears and Owen Benjamins in the world aren't enough to sake our bloodlust for killing deities.

I'm glad I'm off of YouTube. Too much opportunity to be mistaken as a god on there.
 

debeguiled

Peacock
Gold Member
Aurini said:
I'm glad I'm off of YouTube. Too much opportunity to be mistaken as a god on there.

You can be mistaken for a god anywhere, Davis.

That goes for Bosch too.

What with your unlocked levels and all.
 

DeusLuxMeaEst

Pelican
Orthodox Catechumen
Gold Member
I believe I remember AnonymousBosch posting something about this, but has anyone else experienced a series of negative events as you tried to become closer to God?

In my experience I had a somewhat severe ailment out of nowhere where I was unable to stand for longer than a few minutes. It wasn't from rigorous exercise it just appeared one day. I've also had negative and depressive black pilled thoughts in general, like I'm being dragged into negativity.

Could be coincidence, but just wondering if this is a common phenomenon.
 

Dr. Howard

 
Banned
Gold Member
Neo said:
I believe I remember AnonymousBosch posting something about this, but has anyone else experienced a series of negative events as you tried to become closer to God?

In my experience I had a somewhat severe ailment out of nowhere where I was unable to stand for longer than a few minutes. It wasn't from rigorous exercise it just appeared one day. I've also had negative and depressive black pilled thoughts in general, like I'm being dragged into negativity.

Could be coincidence, but just wondering if this is a common phenomenon.

I believe it is common. I've heard it mentioned many times in sermons. To paraphrase a pastor it goes something like this:

"The devil doesn't need to intervene in people that have no relationship with God, they are not a threat and are ignorantly walking right into his arms. However, the closer you get to God, the more the Devil presses in. The more devout you are, the more of a victory it is for the Devil if he can make you fall."

Biblically, just think of the Book of Job. He was a #1 fan of God and so the Devil picked him as the guy to go after the most.

In experience, it seems like the church families that I've seen hit with the most terrible and random tragedies seem to be the strongest with God. At the outset it seems like an awful curse or spite from God. The ones I recall from the last 5 years from devout families are: childhood Leukemia, 2nd bout of Childhood cancer, teenager in a random single care accident, ends up in coma. All diagnoses were considered terminal/permanent disability from doctors.

To an outsider, such tragedy being put on such God loving families would seem like proof that God is evil, indifferent or does not exist. What happened though? 6 months to 2 years later, miraculous and perfect healing in ALL instances. These are not people I read about, these are families I went to church with.

So yes, the closer you get to God, the more difficult and crazy your dark times will seem but also greater will be the victories you have over them with your faith in God.
 

JackinMelbourne

 
Banned
Dr. Howard said:
Neo said:
I believe I remember AnonymousBosch posting something about this, but has anyone else experienced a series of negative events as you tried to become closer to God?

In my experience I had a somewhat severe ailment out of nowhere where I was unable to stand for longer than a few minutes. It wasn't from rigorous exercise it just appeared one day. I've also had negative and depressive black pilled thoughts in general, like I'm being dragged into negativity.

Could be coincidence, but just wondering if this is a common phenomenon.

I believe it is common. I've heard it mentioned many times in sermons. To paraphrase a pastor it goes something like this:

"The devil doesn't need to intervene in people that have no relationship with God, they are not a threat and are ignorantly walking right into his arms. However, the closer you get to God, the more the Devil presses in. The more devout you are, the more of a victory it is for the Devil if he can make you fall."

Biblically, just think of the Book of Job. He was a #1 fan of God and so the Devil picked him as the guy to go after the most.

In experience, it seems like the church families that I've seen hit with the most terrible and random tragedies seem to be the strongest with God. At the outset it seems like an awful curse or spite from God. The ones I recall from the last 5 years from devout families are: childhood Leukemia, 2nd bout of Childhood cancer, teenager in a random single care accident, ends up in coma. All diagnoses were considered terminal/permanent disability from doctors.

To an outsider, such tragedy being put on such God loving families would seem like proof that God is evil, indifferent or does not exist. What happened though? 6 months to 2 years later, miraculous and perfect healing in ALL instances. These are not people I read about, these are families I went to church with.

So yes, the closer you get to God, the more difficult and crazy your dark times will seem but also greater will be the victories you have over them with your faith in God.

Careful... this could also be from self induced mass hypnosis. If bad events are happening to peers in the church who became "closer to god" (higher status) then subconscious programming can take effect and you might unknowingly cause bad things to happen in order to "progress". Thoughts become reality.

This is similar to the SJW religion's victimology. They always need to be a victim in some sort of way to progress and gain cred in the peer group.
 

AnonymousBosch

 
Banned
Gold Member
debeguiled said:
You can be mistaken for a god anywhere, Davis.

That goes for Bosch too.

What with your unlocked levels and all.

Yeah, it's not like guys could, you know, simply be laughing over a meme.

With the Level 4 thing, Davis. It passes, and is a natural part of the growth of Humility, according to St Thomas and St Anselm. What took me out of Level Four was St Therese of Lisieux and the concepts of Practising the Presence of God, and Abandonment to Divine Providence as a form of Trust. This does involve learning to accept your sinful nature, rather than hating yourself for it, and learning to understand it as a conduit for Grace.

You mentioned ages back not understanding the Catholic need for the Laity to talk about how they're terrible Catholics.

The path is this:

1) To know that one is contemptible;
2) To feel affliction at this knowledge;
3) To confess that one is despicable;

YOU ARE HERE

4) To wish one's neighbors to know this;
5) To patiently endure their saying so;

YOU'RE STARTING TO WALK THERE ^

6) To submit to being treated as worthy of contempt;
7) To like to being so treated.

Thus the importance of Confession. You're vocalising your true wretched nature to another human being in - as God prefers - an act of true humility.

It's an odd process. This probably relates to our discussions back in February. Also, If you remember my discussions about the Worldly Priest thinking I'm 'Special' - or me liking being bossed around by the Fussy Sister at the Monastery - or the Boss at the Racecourse giving me a promotion for my due obedience to his requests without ever once having realised I'm not even employed by him, I'm somewhere in the 5-6 area, though, as the Ego dies, it's always a 'two steps forward, one step back' process, as it tries to flare up things you think you've put to bed out of nowhere.

This is eventually supposed to reveal the Formal Motives of the Three Theological Virtues - Faith, Hope and Charity - in what are called The Sublime Forms:

- The Supreme Truth that reveals;
- Mercy ever ready to help;
- Sovereign goodness, ever lovable for its own sake.

They're supposed to be your guiding stars to lead you through the Third Conversion: the Dark Night of the Soul. Pass successfully through that one, and you experience the same infusion of knowledge as the Apostles experience at Pentecost. Remember how I mentioned the Father at the Monastery always ad libs his homilies, and you can ask him any theological question and get exactly the answer to lead you forward?

Hang in there. He'll lead you forward when He sees you're ready.
 

Kid Twist

 
Banned
JackinMelbourne said:
Careful... this could also be from self induced mass hypnosis. If bad events are happening to peers in the church who became "closer to god" (higher status) then subconscious programming can take effect and you might unknowingly cause bad things to happen in order to "progress". Thoughts become reality.

I think this is a wise warning. I'm big on human bias, most of which is certainly recall bias. I know devoted families that have spun the gamut: terrible happenings to those that remained faithful, crazy shit that caused people to fall away, rich people falling away, others that have been blessed by wealth also maintaining faith, and poor people doing the same with their faith, acting it out virtuously or as a degenerate.

Most of all, the demons don't want you to pray. Think about it too, it's the hardest thing to do in our distracted times. Just being silent and still. I am bad at it too, don't worry for now, but let's strive to get better.

I think this is the biggest challenge in the technological ages: constant possibility for attention seeking and consumption. They want you hooked. This was not as possible as late as the 1990s, even.
 

bobmjilica

Sparrow
Dr. Howard said:
Here is an unpopular opinion:

I am suspicious/unsure of E. Michael Jones. I don't claim to be the most literate man on the planet but he sure does seem to have burst on the internet/manosphere scene. My suspicion comes from the rise being as meteoric as Jordan Peterson.

Suspicion 2 comes from my personal mistrust of things coming out of anything in the Catholic higher up.

On the other side, he is critical of Vatican 2, which is great. The SPLC dislikes him, which is also usually a good sign.

Last, his criticism of Jews seems to be a bit obsessive. Borderline "The Jews burnt my toast this morning" type of blame. It seems too simple.

I don't think he just 'burst on the scene'. If you look at his body of work he's been doing the same thing with the same message for over 30 years. His production quality is shit, and he tends to ramble. (He is not that charismatic).
I think he's legit. When he talked about logos and the fact that 'a man has as many masters as he has vices' it struck me on a very deep level. We're rediscovering things that we knew in the past. The 'logos vs antilogos' world view is also 100% true.
Do I think he's a God? No. Is he right about everything? No. Old people say weird stuff sometimes. But he has been doing the same shit for the last 20-30 years. He was railing against globohomo when many of you were in diapers. At the end of the day he's on the side of life and order. He's a good guy.
 

Tail Gunner

Hummingbird
Gold Member
bobmjilica said:
He has been banned from over 30 countries for being against sodomy.

That says everything that you need to know, plus the video shows that he rejects the doctrine of dispensationalism (which places Israel on a pedestal).
 

N°6

Hummingbird
I didn’t release Stephen Anderson was the banned pastor. I watched his you tube sermons years ago. My you tube algorithm seems to put me across banned personalities.
 

MichaelWitcoff

Hummingbird
Orthodox
bobmjilica said:
Any of you know baptist pastor Steven Anderson? What are your thoughts? He has been banned from over 30 countries for being against sodomy.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=v8yRUa9O570

His documentary "Marching To Zion" is well-made and something I encourage people to watch. Apart from that, he's a complete lunatic. The Dimond brothers did a pretty eviscerating takedown of his "ministry," though to be fair they are pretending to be Catholic monks when they are actually not (so anything they say should be taken with a grain of salt).

If you want to see their video on him, you can watch the whole thing here:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3lwwfCpvXnc&t
 

Roosh

Cardinal
Orthodox
The Byrds turned Ecclesiastes 3:1-8 into a song:



I knew the song growing up, but didn't know it was nearly a word-for-word adaption from the Bible:

To everything there is a season,
A time for every purpose under heaven:

A time [a]to be born,
And a time to die;
A time to plant,
And a time to pluck what is planted;
A time to kill,
And a time to heal;
A time to break down,
And a time to build up;
A time to weep,
And a time to laugh;
A time to mourn,
And a time to dance;
A time to cast away stones,
And a time to gather stones;
A time to embrace,
And a time to refrain from embracing;
A time to gain,
And a time to lose;
A time to keep,
And a time to throw away;
A time to tear,
And a time to sew;
A time to keep silence,
And a time to speak;
A time to love,
And a time to hate;
A time of war,
And a time of peace.

https://www.biblegateway.com/passage/?search=ecc+3:1-8&version=NKJV
 

monster

Pelican
Roosh said:
The Byrds turned Ecclesiastes 3:1-8 into a song:

Actually Pete Seeger did. The Byrds popularized it with their cover, but the melody and rhythm are identical. All of the Byrds best songs were covers, usually Dylan.
 

Rigsby

Pelican
Gold Member
“In my beginning is my end. … In my end is my beginning”

https://www.catholicworldreport.com...eginning-is-my-end-in-my-end-is-my-beginning/

“In my beginning is my end.” This line opens “East Coker,” the second section of T.S. Eliot’s poetic masterpiece, Four Quartets. It is followed by a haunting, elegiac reflection on the fragile and transitory nature of life as seen in the cycle of life and death in nature. What is the meaning of our short lives? What hope is man given in this passing world? In whom shall we trust for our salvation?


...

My selected words from East Coker:

http://www.davidgorman.com/4Quartets/2-coker.htm


In my beginning is my end. In succession
Houses rise and fall, crumble, are extended,
Are removed, destroyed, restored, or in their place
Is an open field, or a factory, or a by-pass.
Old stone to new building, old timber to new fires,
Old fires to ashes, and ashes to the earth
Which is already flesh, fur and faeces,
Bone of man and beast, cornstalk and leaf.
Houses live and die: there is a time for building
And a time for living and for generation
And a time for the wind to break the loosened pane

And to shake the wainscot where the field-mouse trots
And to shake the tattered arras woven with a silent motto.

In my beginning is my end.


...


As in their living in the living seasons
The time of the seasons and the constellations
The time of milking and the time of harvest
The time of the coupling of man and woman

And that of beasts. Feet rising and falling.


...


The wounded surgeon plies the steel
That questions the distempered part;
Beneath the bleeding hands we feel
The sharp compassion of the healer's art
Resolving the enigma of the fever chart.

Our only health is the disease
If we obey the dying nurse
Whose constant care is not to please
But to remind of our, and Adam's curse,
And that, to be restored, our sickness must grow worse.


...


There is a time for the evening under starlight,
A time for the evening under lamplight

(The evening with the photograph album).
Love is most nearly itself
When here and now cease to matter.
Old men ought to be explorers
Here or there does not matter
We must be still and still moving
Into another intensity
For a further union, a deeper communion
Through the dark cold and the empty desolation,

The wave cry, the wind cry, the vast waters
Of the petrel and the porpoise.

In my end is my beginning.


...


If you ever make it round my way, we'll have a visit to the church where Elliot is laid to rest in East Coker itself - it's not too far.

I'll read you the entire Four Quartets that is kept in a book inside the church. It may take half an hour or so. It is a meditation on life and death. On birth and rebirth within life. Of death within life itself. It is a prayer, of sorts. The reverberation from within those holy walls giving a gravitas to the words...

All you need to do is close your eyes. Drink in the smell of the old wood. Revel in the beauty of the stained glass works.

Be transported.

sta1.png



...


Then we'll go to the pub a few minutes walk away and drink a few real ales in Elliot's memory, before making our way back...


sta2.png



T. S. Eliot

1888-1965


sta3.png




'in my beginning is my end....in my end is my beginning'
 

infowarrior1

Crow
Protestant
For all Christians to watch out for:


To minimize false converts. Avoid doing this. But do it the way as it is taught in Scripture.

Otherwise you have "Christians" who will end up not manifesting the fruits of the spirit.
 

Hermetic Seal

Pelican
Orthodox
Gold Member
I remembered seeing a video by E Michael Jones several years ago where he talked about the destruction of ethnic European areas of American cities. That was the first I'd heard of him. I'd credit his sudden popularity to people like Roosh and Owen discovering him and that having a ripple effect through others in the dissident media who wanted to talk to him, too.

Definitely doesn't seem as fake as Jordan Peterson, who became a celebrity after a high-profile news story elevated him from nobodyhood.

As a guy who spent much of his youth in laser-light-shows-and-fog-machine churches, I am definitely fed up with the "carnal means" of trying to lure people in. What that usually amounts to is getting Christians from other, less exciting churches to defect, rather than actually attracting people who aren't Christians, who generally think the flashy megachurch model is silly and totally lacking self-awareness.
 

Teedub

Crow
Gold Member
Jordan Peterson isn't 'fake', he simply became a figure in the national consciousness because there was/is an appetite for an academic who wasn't on board with the PC agenda. Now that's been seemingly sated, his popularity has declined.

As an aside, that 'Turn' song is brilliant. Makes me think of Vietnam films, what a great era that was for American music! Now we've got throwaway 'songs' by Ariana Grande (would kiss) about being sore from sex... what a shame. Modernity is a test, it has to be.
 
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