The God pill

AnonymousBosch

 
Banned
Gold Member
'Manual For Interior Souls' is a classic Contemplative work from the 1890's that I order in early January and that I finally received a copy of last week. I picked it up for the first time last night, and flipping it open was immediately-drawn to a particular chapter.

Contemplative Grades of Prayer are of a different order to the Beginner Grades, and as such I think works like this might be hard for those earlier along on the journey toward God to understand. I watched a randomly recommended Youtube video last night, and the man talking described the different between Religionists (Law of Fear / Freedom of Indifference types) and Mystics (Law of Love / Freedom for Excellence types) as the difference between a view of God based upon an Imagined Fantasy Truth of whom God is based upon their particular religious upbringing versus versus those who know His Truth due to this being continually-formed by an Experiential Knowledge of God. Way back near the beginning of this thread, I discussed sensing an 'engine' theory that generated a constant cycle of spiritual growth, particularly via Lived Experience, so this idea resonates with me very well, as it's here in the 'Manual', 85 years before 'Sources of Christian Ethics' was written.

My Priest has taught me recently that you'll know when you're on the right track with God because the idea will be reinforced everywhere you turn in spiritual reading / listening.

So, saying that, give this a read with an open mind, and understand that this is speaking the truth of God learnt through my very, very hard-won lived experience over the last couple of years. Whilst it's possible it won't resonate currently, at the very least I'd ask those in the Meditative States to use it as a springboard for meditation and ask God to reveal its truth to you, but it's an incredible gift for those who are experiencing fear during these current times.

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((()))

Sparrow
Orthodox Inquirer
I had the worst nightmare last night.

The things that happened during that dream, I would never imagine in a million years that I'd partake in them. Thankfully I wasn't participating, but merely a spectator.

I came upon this forum at a time when I was just getting a hold of myself. It was the peak gaming era, and so I, in vain, tried to replicate the lifestyles that were commonplace around here.

All my life I was searching for God in the wrong places, and it is ever so surprising that my faith only grew stronger at a time Roosh took the forum in a new direction.

I don't want to make this all about me, but I feel that what is happening to me, is probably happening to a million people right now. Logos is rising, while the devil is testing us with the nastiest thoughts, dreams or whatever subconscious weapon he has at hand.

The nightmare was a sexual dream, and it happened after I listened to Roosh's latest podcast.

That was enough for me to realize that something bigger is at work. Although I probably get that realization every single day.
 

AnonymousBosch

 
Banned
Gold Member
Some of us were talking about a sense of being targeted earlier. A friend the other night in dreams after praying a useful prayer. I suffer heavy demonic attacks now and then, which are common for contemplative souls. We feel the battle is ramping up.

Note this article discussing the increase in demonic oppression, including people noting even the unusual level of pushback in the comments:

https://www.lifesitenews.com/opinio...crisis-has-unleashed-intense-demonic-activity

Be strong. Trust in God.
 

Deusleveult

Woodpecker
Trad Catholic
AnonymousBosch said:
Some of us were talking about a sense of being targeted earlier. A friend the other night in dreams after praying a useful prayer. I suffer heavy demonic attacks now and then, which are common for contemplative souls. We feel the battle is ramping up.

Note this article discussing the increase in demonic oppression, including people noting even the unusual level of pushback in the comments:

https://www.lifesitenews.com/opinio...crisis-has-unleashed-intense-demonic-activity

Be strong. Trust in God.

You're spot on when you say that "the battle is ramping up", as well as ((())) saying that "something bigger is at work". I think a lot of people are sensing that, even more so people like us on this forum, truth seekers and more spiritually inclined.

I can't help but think of the name of the street that I'm living now : "Martyrs of the Resistance street".
 

AnonymousBosch

 
Banned
Gold Member
Deusleveult said:
You're spot on when you say that "the battle is ramping up", as well as ((())) saying that "something bigger is at work". I think a lot of people are sensing that, even more so people like us on this forum, truth seekers and more spiritually inclined.

Ah, I can't even begin to explain what I just went through, and that I can sense is still going on.

I was naive to say the battle is 'ramping up'. No. The war is on.

If you don't know about Catholic Spiritual Warfare, get reading.

Don't be afraid, just spiritually 'arm yourself'.
 

Wutang

Hummingbird
Gold Member
Pretty sure this is the first time I've seen an American politician at the federal level mention Pelagius. Been keeping my eyes on Hawley since I saw this a while back:

https://www.nationalreview.com/magazine/2019/07/08/josh-hawleys-virtue-politics/

What, exactly, you might ask, does Pelagius have to do with American politics? At a recent commencement address at the King’s College, a small Christian school in Manhattan, Hawley identified the British monk as an early proponent of a “particular philosophy of freedom” that has come to dominate American culture and politics for decades: “It is a philosophy of liberation from family and tradition, of escape from God and community, a philosophy of self-creation and unrestricted, unfettered free choice.”

Sounds like there's lots of secular Pelagius running around these days. The more I read about the various major theological issues that have cropped up through out church history, the more I see how they aren't just abstract philosophical debates but have actual earthly, pragmatic consequences. The realism vs. nominalism debate is another big seemingly merely theoretical debate that has had gigantic consequences on society. Nominalism has been influenced everything about modern culture.
 

Jones

Woodpecker
The Latin Mass performing priest here is skeptical and not buying into the media narrative.

He sent out an e-mail with a, "Reality Check" attachment, showing the number of worldwide deaths from January 1 to April 2.

51,465 deaths by Coronavirus.
123,288 deaths by Seasonal Flu.
248,726 deaths by Malaria.
271,922 deaths by Suicide.
342,303 deaths by Traffic Fatality.
426,269 deaths by HIV/AIDS
634,213 deaths by Alcohol
1,267,629 deaths by Smoking
2,082,595 deaths by Cancer
2,836,025 deaths by Hunger
10,778,021 deaths by Abortion.

He had been continuing to do a maximum 10-person attendance Holy Mass for 10 days after the provincial government ordered a shutdown of everything but non-essential businesses.

Just yesterday, there was a press conference ordering churches to close.

He is now dealing with a complaint filled to the Public Health Department because of his decision to offer the receiving of the Eucharist to the Faithful.
 

Scrapper

Woodpecker
Other Christian
The Real Jesus
The man depicted in Western art is nothing like the one described in the Bible.
BY STEPHEN FLURRY • APRIL 10, 2009

This is the time of year newsmagazines often grace their covers with a pale, tender-skinned, soft-spoken, long-haired, womanish figure wearing a beard. It’s supposed to be Jesus. But these erroneous depictions of Christ look nothing like the Jesus described in your Bible.

The real Jesus was a powerfully built, masculine man—a rugged outdoorsman. He was a man who was master of every situation. He was a people-person and a dynamically persuasive teacher. He was a man of upstanding character—an upholder and promoter of God’s perfect law of liberty.

Isn’t it time you became acquainted with the Jesus of the Bible?

Christ’s Family

Prior to His 3½-year ministry, Jesus Christ was brought up in a large family as the oldest of five brothers and at least three sisters (Matthew 13:54-56). Traditional Christianity depicts Jesus’s stepfather as some kind of uneducated, deadbeat dad who was baffled by his stepson’s remarkable genius. Joseph was supposedly married to a superior woman.

The real Joseph, however, was the loving head, provider, protector and primary educator of this extraordinary family. He was a “just” man, Matthew wrote, with sterling character. Upon learning that Mary was pregnant, Joseph initially intended to secretly dissolve the engagement for the sake of his own reputation—and Mary’s.

But while Joseph “thought on these things,” an angel appeared unto him and said that Mary had conceived of the Holy Spirit. In response to the angel’s instructions, Joseph obeyed God, risked his upstanding reputation in the community, took a pregnant woman to be his wife and accepted her firstborn son as one of his very own.

In northern Galilee, Jesus became known as the son of Joseph (John 6:42). As a teenager and young adult, Jesus worked outdoors, developing into a master craftsman on his stepfather’s carpentry crew.

“And the child grew, and waxed strong in spirit, filled with wisdom: and the grace of God was upon him” (Luke 2:40). This was due, in large part, to the indomitable influence of His mentor and stepfather, Joseph.

When Jesus was 12, for example, Joseph took his wife and children to Jerusalem to observe the Passover and the feast of Unleavened Bread. Only males were required to go to Jerusalem for the three annual festival seasons (Exodus 23:14-17). But Joseph was a successful businessman and family man—so he took the entire family.

It was during this trip to Jerusalem that Jesus wound up in the temple reasoning with the doctors of the law. Having learned to be an exceptional student under His father’s direction, Luke’s account says that Jesus was “hearing” and “asking questions” (Luke 2:46). He was listening and learning from some of the most distinguished educators of His day—this was no ordinary 12-year-old.

His parents, having lost track of Jesus on the way home, returned to Jerusalem to find Him in the temple. They were “amazed.” The teachers of the law were “astonished at his understanding.”

From that point forward, Scripture says, “Jesus increased in wisdom and stature, and in favor with God and man” (verse 52).

The real Jesus grew up in a well-balanced, God-fearing household where His physical father served as head and His mother as a submissive and loving helpmeet and homemaker.

Jesus as Master

In his Trumpet column last week, Robert Morley wrote about the dearth of male teachers in elementary and primary schools today. “Why is society robbing young boys of the masculine role models they need?” he asked. When Morley was a boy, his favorite teachers were the stronger, more authoritative male role models he could look up to.

Isn’t it the same for you? Think back on the male teachers who impacted your life most when you were younger.

Now think about Jesus Christ—the greatest orator and teacher who has ever lived. Why should we imagine Him to be an effeminate weakling who somehow moved the masses while speaking in hushed tones?

“Follow me,” He supposedly whispered to the fishermen, tax collectors and businessmen of His day and, of course, they promptly dropped everything to learn a new profession.

That is not the Jesus of your Bible. The real Jesus “waxed strong” physically and spoke with such powerful conviction and clarity that He astonished the masses! “For he taught them as one having authority, and not as the scribes” (Matthew 7:29).

Jesus Christ did not teach or even look like the self-righteous religious figures of His day. After the miracle of the loaves and fishes, the Jewish commoners wanted to make Jesus a king (John 6:15). His wildly popular impact early on in His ministry enraged the jealous chief priests and Pharisees. “If we let him thus alone, all men will believe on him: and the Romans shall come and take away both our place and nation,” they reasoned in John 11:48. They demanded their officers to apprehend this persuasive scholar. But none of the officers would lay hands on Him.

“No man ever spoke like this man!” they said in John 7:46 (Revised Standard Version).

Jesus Christ simply did not fit into the mold of what people thought a religious leader should look and sound like. He was a hard-working, rugged-looking, masculine family man. He loved construction and numerous other outdoor activities like sailing, hiking and camping. He was an avid reader and studier—conversant in every imaginable topic.

And He loved people. He socialized so much His critics accused Him of being a glutton and winebibber! In actual fact, Jesus was the friendliest man who ever lived. He loved being among crowds. He interacted with Samaritans, the blind and lame, the elderly, and women and children. He broke bread with Pharisees, tax collectors and sinners.

Then there were His students—the disciples. Most of those who dropped everything in order to follow the Messiah later sacrificed their very lives for this impressive, God-fearing man. “Did not our heart burn within us, while he talked with us by the way, and while he opened to us the scriptures?” His disciples lamented after Jesus was gone (Luke 24:32).

Jesus lived the abundant life (John 10:10). He practiced what He preached. And in living in accordance with all of God’s holy laws, He left for us a perfect example to follow (1 Peter 2:21).

Strive to follow those steps set before us by Jesus Christ—the real Jesus, as depicted in the pages of your Bible.
 
ScrapperTL said:
Traditional Christianity depicts Jesus’s stepfather as some kind of uneducated, deadbeat dad who was baffled by his stepson’s remarkable genius.

I have never seen or heard of any Christian expressing such a dim view of St. Joseph. Well over half the Christian world looks to him as the patron saint of fathers - an archetype of patriarchal virtue.

If anyone's portraying St. Joseph as a deadbeat, it's definitely not traditional Christianity. And I have yet to see even a liberal Christian stoop so low either, thank God.
 

kel

 
Banned
It doesn't have as much to do with Christianity as the teaser at the end of the last episode suggested, but still I think Stefan Molyneux's latest episode of Sunset in the Golden State belongs here:

 

Rob Banks

Pelican
In his last podcast, Roosh was talking about spiritual experiences (such as having nightmares when he moved into his mountain house only to discover later that it was a former crack house).

I am new to Christianity. How much weight should I be putting into experiences like this?

Last night, I had an experience like this. If I describe it, it will sound silly, but in the moment it seemed very clear what God was trying to tell me (and it was bad news).
 

Sooth

Pelican
Gold Member
Rob Banks said:
In his last podcast, Roosh was talking about spiritual experiences (such as having nightmares when he moved into his mountain house only to discover later that it was a former crack house).

I am new to Christianity. How much weight should I be putting into experiences like this?

Last night, I had an experience like this. If I describe it, it will sound silly, but in the moment it seemed very clear what God was trying to tell me (and it was bad news).

Can you describe it? God doesn't give bad or perverse dreams although He will allow it if that's what it takes.
 

AnonymousBosch

 
Banned
Gold Member
Rob Banks said:
In his last podcast, Roosh was talking about spiritual experiences (such as having nightmares when he moved into his mountain house only to discover later that it was a former crack house).

I am new to Christianity. How much weight should I be putting into experiences like this?

Last night, I had an experience like this. If I describe it, it will sound silly, but in the moment it seemed very clear what God was trying to tell me (and it was bad news).

Describe the experience. There are rules for Spiritual Discernment that may be of help. I'll post them when I have time.
 

Roosh

Cardinal
Orthodox
Rob Banks said:
In his last podcast, Roosh was talking about spiritual experiences (such as having nightmares when he moved into his mountain house only to discover later that it was a former crack house).

I am new to Christianity. How much weight should I be putting into experiences like this?

Last night, I had an experience like this. If I describe it, it will sound silly, but in the moment it seemed very clear what God was trying to tell me (and it was bad news).

Orthodox does not accept signs from our dreams, meaning we don't plan our lives according to them. Through our dreams we accept there are unseen forces that are influencing us for both good or bad. I interpret dreams on more of a "Hmm that's interesting" level.
 

Rob Banks

Pelican
AnonymousBosch said:
Describe the experience. There are rules for Spiritual Discernment that may be of help. I'll post them when I have time.

OK, so in another thread I talked about what I'm going through with my wife (her being gone and it being my fault). I don't want to go into that too much because there's already a whole thread about it, but basically the best advice I received was to get right with God and trust Him to keep her close to me spiritually (if he so chooses).

In the past, she has been absent for long periods of time but remained in contact with me and her spirit was still with me, if that makes any sense. She would always eventually come back.

This time, though, her attitude has been different (colder, seemingly more indifferent). I convinced myself not to worry about it or read into it too much.

But Friday afternoon, I went to sleep with a jacket on because I was so cold. That night, I woke up still cold. I started the fireplace (which is the heating system I have where I'm living right now) and got under the covers, and I was still cold. It was very weird. It was an intense cold that I never really felt before unless I'm outside during winter and not warmly dressed. It hit me that it was likely a sign that my wife's spirit was no longer with me and that it was time to move on.

I know it sounds silly. I don't really have the words to describe it. It wasn't just that I was cold, it was also an intense feeling like something/someone was missing or gone.

This was not the first time I felt this intense cold. I've been feeling it a lot over the last week or so (but never before that). It did cross my mind that this could be due to loneliness, missing her, etc., but I never put two and two together that it could be a sign that her spirit is gone.

A forum member I was talking to about this recently told me "I don't think you should be meeting other women while you're still married. If God decides there's someone else for you, it will hit you like a ton of bricks and there will be no doubt in your mind that it's time to move on."

It is really confusing to me why God would be telling me so strongly that she is worth fighting for, even that I owe it to her to fight for her and bring her to God (after all the bad things I did to her), but at the same time He is sending me signals like this, letting me know her spirit is no longer with me and to move on.

I don't mean to hijack this thread with my own personal issues. I already have a thread for that and I've gotten some very good advice. I just felt like it was necessary to describe the situation, otherwise the experience I had wouldn't make any sense out of context.
 

AnonymousBosch

 
Banned
Gold Member
Rob Banks said:
It is really confusing to me why God would be telling me so strongly that she is worth fighting for, even that I owe it to her to fight for her and bring her to God (after all the bad things I did to her), but at the same time He is sending me signals like this, letting me know her spirit is no longer with me and to move on.

I'm about to head out for an hour or so, so I'll write more when I get back.

Just briefly:

- you are too early along in your spiritual life to be able to tell what a 'sign' from God is and to discern the will of the holy spirit, including thinking your current separation is a negative state that needs to be immediately-resolved; so I would advise you to pay no mind to this train of thought any further;

- the evil spirit can disguise itself as a good spirit, which is why there are rules for discernment for this kind of situation, which deal with internal thoughts and impulses;

- God can't ever contradict himself: if you were legally-married in His eyes, His will would be to resolve the issues in the marriage, not tear it asunder.

- you don't need to 'do' anything but learn that you can't rely on your own strength at all, and, so, understand the only who resolves this situation is God. Your part in this is understanding you are being trialled to mortify the negative parts of you that damaged your marriage, through falls, humiliations, frustrations and trials, all of which you accept as his providence with a spirit of acceptance, gratitude and love, for these trials will sanctify you. Whilst this sounds horrific to our fallen human nature, the true misery is prolonged by fighting against it.

Understand He will also send you sensible consolations to strengthen you in this battle, but they aren't to be desired for their own end.

Back in a bit.
 

Rob Banks

Pelican
AnonymousBosch said:
...
- God can't ever contradict himself: if you were legally-married in His eyes, His will would be to resolve the issues in the marriage, not tear it asunder.
...

At the time we got married, I was an atheist and insisted we get married in front of a civil judge and not in a church.

I also had crazy ideas about non-monogamy that I tried to push on her. She is from a very traditional background and, for the most part, refused to go along with it, but it took a heavy toll on the marriage.

The marriage was also done primarily for legal reasons (for her to obtain a green card), but we did have a very deep connection and desired to have a family together one day.

(I did not go abroad to a random country looking for a wife. She is from the same South American town where my mother was born. My mother and her father went to school together as kids.)

In your opinion, does this invalidate the marriage in God's eyes?

Feel free to respond via PM. I don't want to make this thread all about me and my personal issues.

P.S. You say "God can't contradict himself" and that if the marriage was legitimate, God would want to fix it.

This doesn't seem to leave a lot of room for the (in my mind, very real) possibility that the marriage was legitimate but my wife has now made up her mind to move on, and that it is simply too late to fix. Or that it's too late to fix because her father disapproves of me. Or a number of possible outcomes where the marriage was legitimate but can't be fixed no matter what I do.
 

AnonymousBosch

 
Banned
Gold Member
I'll answer it publicly, Rob, because what I'm saying is applicable not just for you, including someone who might stumble across this later.

Rob Banks said:
Or a number of possible outcomes where the marriage was legitimate but can't be fixed no matter what I do.

This is what I was talking about before: Heh, I remember thinking I had to do things to, and deciding for God what I believed was and wasn't possible for Him to do.

If you're faithful, and you learn to trust in Him, what is broken can easily be repaired, but it requires patience, trust and acceptance that His will happens in His time, not ours. I didn't know this when I was first justified, and had to learn it through experience.

For example, I'd been given Infused Knowledge that there was a curse over my family. I was obviously eager to get it removed. I tried and tried to find Priests who might take it seriously, and after about 3 months of this, I wondered why God would give me this information if I could do nothing about it.

So, I accepted his Will, and said to him that I trusted it would be resolved when He wanted it to be resolved, and then worried no more about it.

9 months of active, hard mortification later, what seemed like random circumstances put in the company of a Priest who not only recognized the problem and knew you how to petition Jesus to break it; but was also a specialist in the reparation of childhood sexual abuse via the teachings of St Thomas. He not only worked with me, he worked with my Sister and the process brought her back to the Church, and I have utter surety that, in time, God will bring my Father back to him via this Priest.

God is even more efficient than that: Since my background is in Psychology and Psychiatry, I understand the teachings enough to be able to help this Priest with his work, when he'd been asking God to send him a helper, and trusted it would be done. See how efficient God is? One thing I've noticed is when your wish is answered, he's also taking care of someone else at the same time.

I'm simply incapable of praising Him to the level He deserves.

God has called you back: this is the first justification. Understand that God is currently sounding your depths: He wants to see if you trust Him in various ways, and don't wander away if you don't immediately or always get what you think will make you happen, incorrectly-judging that this frustration of your personal will means that He doesn't love you. Many people turn to God when things get hard, then quickly abandon him when comfort returns. Others never really learn it's not about external acts of perceived holiness, but an inwards conversion of heart, so they're not called closer to Him. God wants a more complex, loving relationship, which is why he's very patient and kind at correcting our faults, and it's a gradual process towards sanctification.

With 'kind', yes, some of what comes will be painful: like St Peter, you will overestimate what you can do for God, not understanding your limitations. Through your falls, you will learn who you really are without God: see St Peter denying Jesus three times then crying with shame as he realises his betrayal. Then Jesus forgives him, and asks him "Peter, do you love me?" Understand each humiliating revelation of your sinful, fallen nature is really an opportunity to come back to him and tell him you're sorry and that you love Him, and thereby learn to trust Him more. And no, I'm not telling anyone to actively-will sin. It'll happen readily-enough.

You have to be very careful about judging the value of anything that happens to you going forward: you will learn that even negative and painful situations are invitations to trust Him more. You might be without your wife for months, or years. Either way, tell God: Thy will be done. Obviously, Mass isn't on the cards at the moment, but keep up regular prayer and meditation, and do spiritual reading where you can.

I would suggest saying this prayer regularly for your Wife and her Father so as to combat demonic temptations to bitterness, unforgiveness and despair:

Lord Jesus, I forgive n. and n. in your name, and I ask you to bring down your blessings upon them.
 
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