The Harrowing of Hell

Eusebius Erasmus

Kingfisher
Orthodox
From the Scriptures, we know that Jesus preached in Hell after His death:

For for this cause was the gospel preached also to them that are dead, that they might be judged according to men in the flesh, but live according to God in the spirit. (1 Peter 4:6)

Orthodox tradition also holds that John the Baptist preached to those in Hell.

Since Jesus preached to those in Hell, this suggests that some of the damned souls refused to hear the Gospel, and preferred to remain in Hell.

I wonder what this suggests about Hell: are some people so enslaved to their passions that they refuse to accept Heaven, even when tasting hellfire?

What do the Holy Fathers say about this?
 

Uponthisrock

Sparrow
1 Peter 1:9-11
for you are receiving the end result of your faith, the salvation of your souls.
Concerning this salvation, the prophets, who spoke of the grace that was to come to you, searched intently and with the greatest care, trying to find out the time and circumstances to which the Spirit of Christ in them was pointing when he predicted the sufferings of the Messiah and the glories that would follow.

Just for the sake of my own clarification.
Are we suggesting Jesus attempted to save those who were damned or was he simply condemning them?
The passage above makes it clear that they had already heard the words of Christ through the prophets of old.
Forgive me if I am misunderstanding the intent.
 

SoCal9705

Pigeon
From the Scriptures, we know that Jesus preached in Hell after His death:



Orthodox tradition also holds that John the Baptist preached to those in Hell.

Since Jesus preached to those in Hell, this suggests that some of the damned souls refused to hear the Gospel, and preferred to remain in Hell.

I wonder what this suggests about Hell: are some people so enslaved to their passions that they refuse to accept Heaven, even when tasting hellfire?

What do the Holy Fathers say about this?

There is a long tradition that Jesus did not descend to the Hell of the damned, but rather to the abode of the dead, called heall but also known as Sheoul - a place where the souls of the just went to await the Messiah and be released to Heaven. Gehenna is the Hell of the damned and Jesus and John did not go there.
 

RKS

Sparrow

Is Hell a Place of Eternal Torment?​


Some Bible translations use the word “hell” for the Hebrew word “Sheol” and the matching Greek word “Hades,” both of which refer to the common grave of mankind. (Psalm 16:10; Acts 2:27) Many people believe in a fiery hell, However, does the Bible teach otherwise?

  1. Those in hell are unconscious and so cannot feel pain. “There is no work nor devising nor knowledge nor wisdom in Sheol.”—Ecclesiastes 9:10.
  2. Good people go to hell. The faithful men Jacob and Job expected to go there.—Genesis 37:35; Job 14:13.
  3. Death, not torment in a fiery hell, is the penalty for sin. “He who has died has been acquitted from his sin.”—Romans 6:7.
  4. Eternal torment would violate God’s justice. (Deuteronomy 32:4) When the first man, Adam, sinned, God told him that his punishment would simply be to pass out of existence: “Dust you are and to dust you will return.” (Genesis 3:19) God would have been lying if he were actually sending Adam to a fiery hell.
  5. God does not even contemplate eternal torment. The idea that he would punish people in hellfire is contrary to the Bible’s teaching that “God is love.”—⁠1 John 4:8; Jeremiah 7:31.
 

Sitting Bull

Woodpecker
Those in hell are unconscious and so cannot feel pain. “There is no work nor devising nor knowledge nor wisdom in Sheol.”—Ecclesiastes 9:10
Complete non-sequitur ; compare this to someone feeling excruciating pain in this world and this life. It is quite true that "there is no work nor devising nor knowledge nor wisdom" in this state, but that doesn't mean it's unconscious.
Rather, the text means that no work/devising/knowledge will be available to alleviate the pain.

Good people go to hell. The faithful men Jacob and Job expected to go there.—Genesis 37:35; Job 14:13.

The first sentence is blasphemy denying the justice of God. Regarding the second sentence, the faithful expect and are afraid to go there but hope not to, and hope in God's mercy.
 
From the Scriptures, we know that Jesus preached in Hell after His death:



Orthodox tradition also holds that John the Baptist preached to those in Hell.

Since Jesus preached to those in Hell, this suggests that some of the damned souls refused to hear the Gospel, and preferred to remain in Hell.

I wonder what this suggests about Hell: are some people so enslaved to their passions that they refuse to accept Heaven, even when tasting hellfire?

What do the Holy Fathers say about this?
Yes, there are some who are so enslaved to their passions that they refuse to accept Heaven, even when tasting hellfire. One is "locked-in" after death, and so are the demons who made their choice in Eternity. They know the decision they made condemned them to hell, and they would make the same decision all over again. They can't stand to be in the presence of the "perfect good", like a spouse who's cheated, they have to leave the room.

The Lord didn't preach "to those in Hell" but "to them that are dead" which is a big difference. The Saints were never in Hell.

As an aside... After His death, but before His Resurrection, when The Lord preached to those who were dead, I like to think that the first person He preached to was St. Joseph, the man The Lord knew as "father." It seems like that would be an extremely joyful reunion, and all the Prophets and the Patriarchs would be cheering it on. I'm not basing that on the saying or teaching or vision of any Saint, it's just a simple idea that makes me smile.
 
There is a long tradition that Jesus did not descend to the Hell of the damned, but rather to the abode of the dead, called heall but also known as Sheoul - a place where the souls of the just went to await the Messiah and be released to Heaven. Gehenna is the Hell of the damned and Jesus and John did not go there.

Your post brought to mind how Abraham saw Christ: "Your father Abraham rejoiced that he would see my day. He saw it and was glad.” So the Jews said to him, “You are not yet fifty years old, and have you seen Abraham?” Jesus said to them, “Truly, truly, I say to you, before Abraham was, I am.” John 8:56-58

In Greek the verbs "rejoiced" and "saw" are in the aorist tense, which does not define a particular time such as past or present but indicates the event happened once and was not ongoing. So this was a single, specific event.

In a sense patriarchs like Abraham knew Christ the same way they knew God's law, even though neither Moses or Jesus had yet been physically born. Abraham would have been aware of his sin and dependence on God's mercy and, like Job, must have been aware he needed a Redeemer, someone to plead his cause and erase his sin, even if he didn't know exactly how God would accomplish that.

The passage from John indicates even more: there was a specific event when Abraham saw Jesus face to face and rejoiced.
 

Is Hell a Place of Eternal Torment?​


Some Bible translations use the word “hell” for the Hebrew word “Sheol” and the matching Greek word “Hades,” both of which refer to the common grave of mankind. (Psalm 16:10; Acts 2:27) Many people believe in a fiery hell, However, does the Bible teach otherwise?

  1. Those in hell are unconscious and so cannot feel pain. “There is no work nor devising nor knowledge nor wisdom in Sheol.”—Ecclesiastes 9:10.
  2. Good people go to hell. The faithful men Jacob and Job expected to go there.—Genesis 37:35; Job 14:13.
  3. Death, not torment in a fiery hell, is the penalty for sin. “He who has died has been acquitted from his sin.”—Romans 6:7.
  4. Eternal torment would violate God’s justice. (Deuteronomy 32:4) When the first man, Adam, sinned, God told him that his punishment would simply be to pass out of existence: “Dust you are and to dust you will return.” (Genesis 3:19) God would have been lying if he were actually sending Adam to a fiery hell.
  5. God does not even contemplate eternal torment. The idea that he would punish people in hellfire is contrary to the Bible’s teaching that “God is love.”—⁠1 John 4:8; Jeremiah 7:31.

Search for thread titled "Hell" in the Faith General forum. There is a full discussion there.

You took a few scriptures the wrong way and misunderstood the reality. To one of your points, "God is love," that means he must punish the wicked. How would God love his chosen people if he allowed the wicked to prosper and oppress them forever, and never avenged the blood of his martyred saints? Your concept of love is weak, romantic and effeminate. The love of God, which is the only true and pure love, comes from a perfectly holy being and is bound together with His perfect justice.

Here are a few scriptures to show you that hell is real and is a place of eternal fire.

Matthew 25:41,46. Then he will say to those on his left, ‘Depart from me, you cursed, into the eternal fire prepared for the devil and his angels... And these will go away into eternal punishment, but the righteous into eternal life.

Jude 1:7,13. Just as Sodom and Gomorrah and the surrounding cities, which likewise indulged in sexual immorality and pursued unnatural desire, serve as an example by undergoing a punishment of eternal fire...
Wild waves of the sea, casting up the foam of their own shame; wandering stars, for whom the gloom of utter darkness has been reserved forever.

2 Thessalonians 1:9. They will suffer the punishment of eternal destruction, away from the presence of the Lord and from the glory of his might

Mark 9:43. And if your hand causes you to sin, cut it off. It is better for you to enter life crippled than with two hands to go to hell, to the unquenchable fire.

Daniel 12:2. And many of those who sleep in the dust of the earth shall awake, some to everlasting life, and some to shame and everlasting contempt.

Luke 3:17. His winnowing fork is in his hand, to clear his threshing floor and to gather the wheat into his barn, but the chaff he will burn with unquenchable fire.

Isaiah 66:24. And they shall go out and look on the dead bodies of the men who have rebelled against me. For their worm shall not die, their fire shall not be quenched, and they shall be an abhorrence to all flesh.

Revelation 14:9b-11. If anyone worships the beast and its image and receives a mark on his forehead or on his hand, he also will drink the wine of God's wrath, poured full strength into the cup of his anger, and he will be tormented with fire and sulfur in the presence of the holy angels and in the presence of the Lamb. And the smoke of their torment goes up forever and ever, and they have no rest, day or night, these worshipers of the beast and its image, and whoever receives the mark of its name.

Isaiah 33:14. The sinners in Zion are afraid; trembling has seized the godless: “Who among us can dwell with the consuming fire? Who among us can dwell with everlasting burnings?
 
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RKS

Sparrow

What Is the Lake of Fire? Is It the Same as Hell or Gehenna?​

The lake of fire is a symbol of eternal destruction. It is the same as Gehenna, but it is different from hell, which is the common grave of mankind.

Not a literal lake​

The five Bible verses that mention “the lake of fire” show it to be a symbol rather than a literal lake. (Revelation 19:20; 20:10, 14, 15; 21:8) The following are cast into the lake of fire:

  • The Devil. (Revelation 20:10) As a spirit creature, the Devil cannot be harmed by literal fire.—Exodus 3:2; Judges 13:20.
  • Death. (Revelation 20:14) This is not a literal entity but represents a state of inactivity, the absence of life. (Ecclesiastes 9:10) Death cannot literally be burned.
  • “The wild beast” and “the false prophet.” (Revelation 19:20) Since these are symbols, doesn’t it seem reasonable to conclude that the lake they are thrown into is also a symbol?—Revelation 13:11, 12; 16:13.

A symbol of eternal destruction​

The Bible says that the lake of fire “means the second death.” (Revelation 20:14; 21:8) The first kind of death mentioned in the Bible resulted from Adam’s sin. This death can be reversed by resurrection and will eventually be eliminated by God.—1 Corinthians 15:21, 22, 26.

There is no release from the symbolic lake of fire-

The lake of fire represents a different, or second, kind of death. Although it too represents a state of total inactivity, it is different in that the Bible says nothing about a resurrection from the second death. For example, the Bible says that Jesus has “the keys of hell and of death,” showing that he has the authority to release people from the death brought by Adam’s sin. (Revelation 1:18; 20:13, King James Version) However, neither Jesus nor anyone else has a key to the lake of fire. That symbolic lake represents eternal punishment in the form of permanent destruction.—2 Thessalonians 1:9.

Identical to Gehenna, the Valley of Hinnom​

Gehenna (Greek geʹen·na) is mentioned 12 times in the Bible. Like the lake of fire, it is a symbol of eternal destruction. Although some translations render this word as “hell,” Gehenna is different from hell (Hebrew sheʼohlʹ, Greek haiʹdes).

The Valley of Hinnom
The word “Gehenna” literally means “Valley of Hinnom,” referring to a valley just outside Jerusalem. In Bible times, the city residents used this valley as a garbage dump. They kept a fire constantly burning there to destroy refuse; maggots consumed anything that the fire did not reach.

Jesus used Gehenna as a symbol of everlasting destruction. (Matthew 23:33) He said that in Gehenna “the maggot does not die and the fire is not put out.” (Mark 9:47, 48) He thus alluded to the conditions in the Valley of Hinnom and also to the prophecy at Isaiah 66:24, which says: “They will go out and look on the carcasses of the men who rebelled against me; for the worms on them will not die, and their fire will not be extinguished.” Jesus’ illustration describes, not torture, but complete annihilation. The worms and fire consume carcasses, or dead bodies, not living people.

The Bible gives no indication of any return from Gehenna. “The lake of fire” and “the fiery Gehenna” both represent permanent, everlasting destruction.—Revelation 20:14, 15; 21:8; Matthew 18:9.

How “tormented day and night forever and ever”?​

If the lake of fire is a symbol of destruction, why does the Bible say that in it the Devil, the wild beast, and the false prophet “will be tormented day and night forever and ever”? (Revelation 20:10) Consider four reasons why this torment does not refer to literal torture:

  1. For the Devil to be tortured eternally, he would have to be kept alive forever. However, the Bible says that he will be brought to nothing, or put out of existence. — Hebrews 2:14.
  2. Everlasting life is a gift from God, not a punishment.—Romans 6:23.
  3. The wild beast and the false prophet are symbols and cannot experience literal torture.
  4. The context of the Bible indicates that the torment of the Devil is everlasting restraint or destruction.
The word used for “torment” in the Bible can also mean “a condition of restraint.” For example, the Greek word for “tormentors” used at Matthew 18:34 is rendered as “jailers” in many translations, showing the connection between the words “torment” and “restraint.” Likewise, the parallel accounts at Matthew 8:29 and Luke 8:30, 31 equate “torment” with “the abyss,” a figurative place of complete inactivity or death. (Romans 10:7; Revelation 20:1, 3) In fact, several times the book of Revelation uses the word “torment” in a symbolic sense.—Revelation 9:5; 11:10; 18:7, 10.
 

What Is the Lake of Fire? Is It the Same as Hell or Gehenna?​

The lake of fire is a symbol of eternal destruction. It is the same as Gehenna, but it is different from hell, which is the common grave of mankind.

Not a literal lake​

The five Bible verses that mention “the lake of fire” show it to be a symbol rather than a literal lake. (Revelation 19:20; 20:10, 14, 15; 21:8) The following are cast into the lake of fire:

  • The Devil. (Revelation 20:10) As a spirit creature, the Devil cannot be harmed by literal fire.—Exodus 3:2; Judges 13:20.
  • Death. (Revelation 20:14) This is not a literal entity but represents a state of inactivity, the absence of life. (Ecclesiastes 9:10) Death cannot literally be burned.
  • “The wild beast” and “the false prophet.” (Revelation 19:20) Since these are symbols, doesn’t it seem reasonable to conclude that the lake they are thrown into is also a symbol?—Revelation 13:11, 12; 16:13.

A symbol of eternal destruction​

The Bible says that the lake of fire “means the second death.” (Revelation 20:14; 21:8) The first kind of death mentioned in the Bible resulted from Adam’s sin. This death can be reversed by resurrection and will eventually be eliminated by God.—1 Corinthians 15:21, 22, 26.

There is no release from the symbolic lake of fire-

The lake of fire represents a different, or second, kind of death. Although it too represents a state of total inactivity, it is different in that the Bible says nothing about a resurrection from the second death. For example, the Bible says that Jesus has “the keys of hell and of death,” showing that he has the authority to release people from the death brought by Adam’s sin. (Revelation 1:18; 20:13, King James Version) However, neither Jesus nor anyone else has a key to the lake of fire. That symbolic lake represents eternal punishment in the form of permanent destruction.—2 Thessalonians 1:9.

Identical to Gehenna, the Valley of Hinnom​

Gehenna (Greek geʹen·na) is mentioned 12 times in the Bible. Like the lake of fire, it is a symbol of eternal destruction. Although some translations render this word as “hell,” Gehenna is different from hell (Hebrew sheʼohlʹ, Greek haiʹdes).

The Valley of Hinnom
The word “Gehenna” literally means “Valley of Hinnom,” referring to a valley just outside Jerusalem. In Bible times, the city residents used this valley as a garbage dump. They kept a fire constantly burning there to destroy refuse; maggots consumed anything that the fire did not reach.

Jesus used Gehenna as a symbol of everlasting destruction. (Matthew 23:33) He said that in Gehenna “the maggot does not die and the fire is not put out.” (Mark 9:47, 48) He thus alluded to the conditions in the Valley of Hinnom and also to the prophecy at Isaiah 66:24, which says: “They will go out and look on the carcasses of the men who rebelled against me; for the worms on them will not die, and their fire will not be extinguished.” Jesus’ illustration describes, not torture, but complete annihilation. The worms and fire consume carcasses, or dead bodies, not living people.

The Bible gives no indication of any return from Gehenna. “The lake of fire” and “the fiery Gehenna” both represent permanent, everlasting destruction.—Revelation 20:14, 15; 21:8; Matthew 18:9.

How “tormented day and night forever and ever”?​

If the lake of fire is a symbol of destruction, why does the Bible say that in it the Devil, the wild beast, and the false prophet “will be tormented day and night forever and ever”? (Revelation 20:10) Consider four reasons why this torment does not refer to literal torture:

  1. For the Devil to be tortured eternally, he would have to be kept alive forever. However, the Bible says that he will be brought to nothing, or put out of existence. — Hebrews 2:14.
  2. Everlasting life is a gift from God, not a punishment.—Romans 6:23.
  3. The wild beast and the false prophet are symbols and cannot experience literal torture.
  4. The context of the Bible indicates that the torment of the Devil is everlasting restraint or destruction.
The word used for “torment” in the Bible can also mean “a condition of restraint.” For example, the Greek word for “tormentors” used at Matthew 18:34 is rendered as “jailers” in many translations, showing the connection between the words “torment” and “restraint.” Likewise, the parallel accounts at Matthew 8:29 and Luke 8:30, 31 equate “torment” with “the abyss,” a figurative place of complete inactivity or death. (Romans 10:7; Revelation 20:1, 3) In fact, several times the book of Revelation uses the word “torment” in a symbolic sense.—Revelation 9:5; 11:10; 18:7, 10.

You've done a lot of mental gymnastics, but what is your point? That we should fear God less?

Let's take your point of view for a minute and imagine the lake of fire, the place of everlasting burning which is mentioned far more than 5 times in the Bible, is "symbolic." You still do not want to go there.
 
From the Scriptures, we know that Jesus preached in Hell after His death:



Orthodox tradition also holds that John the Baptist preached to those in Hell.

Since Jesus preached to those in Hell, this suggests that some of the damned souls refused to hear the Gospel, and preferred to remain in Hell.

I wonder what this suggests about Hell: are some people so enslaved to their passions that they refuse to accept Heaven, even when tasting hellfire?

What do the Holy Fathers say about this?

"After Jesus died his blessed soul went down into the part of hell called Limbo. Limbo is a place of rest, where the souls of the just who died before Christ were detained. The souls of the just were detained in Limbo because they couldn't go up to the Kingdom of Heaven till Christ had opened it up for them" (A Catechism of Christian Doctrine).
 

Is Hell a Place of Eternal Torment?​


Some Bible translations use the word “hell” for the Hebrew word “Sheol” and the matching Greek word “Hades,” both of which refer to the common grave of mankind. (Psalm 16:10; Acts 2:27) Many people believe in a fiery hell, However, does the Bible teach otherwise?


  1. Good people go to hell. The faithful men Jacob and Job expected to go there.—Genesis 37:35; Job 14:13
Correct.
Hell=Sheol=Hades=Inferus='the grave'.

The eternal lake of fire is the "second death" - the stand-alone term referring to the everlasting destruction of the soul, from which no redemption is possible. Adam & Eve, the people of Sodom/Gomorrah, Korah, Dathan, Abiram, Judas Iscariot, and Ananias & Sapphira were examples of those that went straight to the "second death" (Gehenna) upon their execution.

Hell is not the lake of fire:
Revelation 20:14 (KJV) "And death and hell were cast into the lake of fire. This is the second death."
 
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Eusebius Erasmus

Kingfisher
Orthodox
There is a long tradition that Jesus did not descend to the Hell of the damned, but rather to the abode of the dead, called heall but also known as Sheoul - a place where the souls of the just went to await the Messiah and be released to Heaven. Gehenna is the Hell of the damned and Jesus and John did not go there.

Did everyone go to Sheol before Christ's death and resurrection, or did some righteous -- like Enoch and Elijah -- go directly to Heaven?
 

RKS

Sparrow
Christ’s resurrection is said to be “a guarantee to all men” that God will resurrect others. (Acts 17:31; 24:15) This would not be true if God had already been resurrecting righteous men to heaven all through the preceding centuries.

Jesus Christ, who resided in the heavens with his Father for untold centuries prior to his coming to earth. said: “No man has ascended into heaven but he that descended from heaven, the Son of man.” (John 3:13) Speaking of John the Baptist, Jesus said: “Among those born of women there has not been raised up a greater than John the Baptist; but a person that is a lesser one in the kingdom of the heavens is greater than he is.” (Matt. 11:11) Accordingly, Elijah, not being greater than John, could not be in heaven.
 

Uponthisrock

Sparrow
Luke 16 starting at 19 speaks of the rich man and the poor Lazarus.
This rich man is clearly in some form of eternal torment and is aware of his failings. He does not try to say he is wrongly tormented, he has full knowledge of the truth.
There is a large chasm between Abraham this poor man Lazarus and the rich man.
Some would call this place for the "good" people Abraham's bosom.
There's two locations in this story.
Neither of which are Heaven or Hell.
Hell comes into play after the second coming.
I would be very careful for anyone who thinks this incident is nothing more than a parable. This is Jesus speaking of a real incident.
There is real suffering that is eternal for those who turned away from God.
 

Eusebius Erasmus

Kingfisher
Orthodox
Luke 16 starting at 19 speaks of the rich man and the poor Lazarus.
This rich man is clearly in some form of eternal torment and is aware of his failings. He does not try to say he is wrongly tormented, he has full knowledge of the truth.
There is a large chasm between Abraham this poor man Lazarus and the rich man.
Some would call this place for the "good" people Abraham's bosom.
There's two locations in this story.
Neither of which are Heaven or Hell.
Hell comes into play after the second coming.
I would be very careful for anyone who thinks this incident is nothing more than a parable. This is Jesus speaking of a real incident.
There is real suffering that is eternal for those who turned away from God.

Very perceptive, thank you.

Does Christ's death, resurrection, and glorious ascension cause this chasm between the righteous and the unrighteous to be affected in any way?
 

SoCal9705

Pigeon
Did everyone go to Sheol before Christ's death and resurrection, or did some righteous -- like Enoch and Elijah -- go directly to Heaven?

No one could have gone to Heaven before the Resurrection. The souls of the just went to Sheoul where they were content. Jesus "descended" there after the Crucifixion, announced the good news, and at the Resurrection they were released into Heaven.
 
Jesus paid the full penalty of the 2nd death(Lake of Fire) during the 3 hours of darkness on the Cross after which our LORD said "It is finished"(John 19:30).

Then he entered the bowels of death to overcome that afterwards, preaching to the spirits in prison and harrowing Hades in the process.
 

The Penitent Man

Woodpecker
God does not even contemplate eternal torment.
So does Satan go to eternal torment in hell? Does God forgive him and the fallen angels because He is such a nice guy? What you are asserting is that God is a foolish judge not true to His Word.

Don’t make the Lord your God into a dupe. This is blasphemous. Do you take the words of Jesus Christ for granted?

“If your hand or your foot causes you to stumble, cut it off and throw it away. It is better for you to enter life maimed or crippled than to have two hands or two feet and be thrown into eternal fire.

Hell is real, and it is eternal. It is the “second death.” This is made abundantly clear throughout the Bible, New Testament especially.

Orthodox tradition also holds that John the Baptist preached to those in Hell.

Huh? Here’s what the Son of God said, sounds pretty final to me:

22 “The time came when the beggar died and the angels carried him to Abraham’s side. The rich man also died and was buried. 23 In Hades, where he was in torment, he looked up and saw Abraham far away, with Lazarus by his side. 24 So he called to him, ‘Father Abraham,have pity on me and send Lazarus to dip the tip of his finger in water and cool my tongue, because I am in agony in this fire.’

25 “But Abraham replied, ‘Son, remember that in your lifetime you received your good things, while Lazarus received bad things,but now he is comforted here and you are in agony.26 And besides all this, between us and you a great chasm has been set in place, so that those who want to go from here to you cannot, nor can anyone cross over from there to us.’

27 “He answered, ‘Then I beg you, father, send Lazarus to my family, 28 for I have five brothers. Let him warn them,so that they will not also come to this place of torment.’

29 “Abraham replied, ‘They have Moses(I) and the Prophets; let them listen to them.’

30 “‘No, father Abraham,’he said, ‘but if someone from the dead goes to them, they will repent.’

31 “He said to him, ‘If they do not listen to Moses and the Prophets, they will not be convinced even if someone rises from the dead.’”

Doesn’t appear that any extra preaching was going to do the job for the condemned.
 
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