The Incoming Food Shortages

William Faulkner

Woodpecker
Orthodox
I live in Australia and in a state that still has (and is scaling up) vaccine mandates/passports and is still masking kids.
We already have food shortages and have had them ever since a tyrant was elected to head the state. Shelves are empty and items that are on the shelves are limited to 1 per customer.
The tyrant party is focused on climate change though, so they can hate themselves slightly less when they drive a car or use electricity.
Really amazing just how full blown totalitarian Australia has gone. Dan Brown and Scomo are tyrannical dictators. They should be tarred and feathered. Same with Canada.
 

Enigma

Hummingbird
Orthodox Inquirer
Gold Member
Canned chicken in bulk packs (2 packs or even six packs) is the lowest priced source of shelf stable meat. Meat can be preserved by freezing, drying, or canning. Obviously freezing exposes you to the risk of losing power. Dried meat is expensive, and while I like beef jerky now and then, I wouldn't prefer it as a staple. That leaves canned meat as the best option.

If you look at the price per pound, canned chicken comes out the best. Canned chicken is very good with rice and other casserole type dishes. Canned beef is surprisingly good with rice as well, and canned hams would be good with beans or split peas. However, these cost more per pound. Finally, there's Spam, which I personally like. However, again, this is more expensive than the chicken. All of these should be good on the shelf for 3-5 years.

Generic canned luncheon meat (Spam) is roughly the same price or cheaper than canned chicken breast per pound, if you shop somewhere like Aldi's. And it has WAY more calories.

Just going on what's in my cabinet:

Brookdale (Aldi's) Canned Luncheon Meat = 1080 calories per 12 oz (180 calories per serving x 6 servings)
Hormel's Canned Chicken Breast = 270 calories per 12 oz (45 calories per serving x 6 servings)

The chicken has about 25% more protein, but that only comes out to 12 grams for 12 oz.
 

Thomas More

Crow
Protestant
Generic canned luncheon meat (Spam) is roughly the same price or cheaper than canned chicken breast per pound, if you shop somewhere like Aldi's. And it has WAY more calories.

Just going on what's in my cabinet:

Brookdale (Aldi's) Canned Luncheon Meat = 1080 calories per 12 oz (180 calories per serving x 6 servings)
Hormel's Canned Chicken Breast = 270 calories per 12 oz (45 calories per serving x 6 servings)

The chicken has about 25% more protein, but that only comes out to 12 grams for 12 oz.
I hadn't considered the calories. Spam wins on a calorie per dollar basis. Also, canned chicken has a lot of weight in juice. Spam is solid processed meat product. Spam has a high level of fat vs protein, but in a crisis situation, that would be just what's needed.

You're lucky to have an Aldi's nearby. I don't have them in my area, but I do have Walmart. I don't like off brand Spam, so I have to compare the price for the brand name product with Great Value brand canned chicken.
 

Mountaineer

 
Banned
Orthodox Catechumen
Gold Member
Do you think Europe will really have such a dire situation? There are still many large wheat exporters like Germany and France and I think Romania, Bulgaria, and Hungary could step up production. Where I'd be really concerned is places like Africa and the Middle East first, and then I'd be concerned about Southeast Asia and Central America next.
Central America? I thought that a country like Mexico produces enough to have a surplus.
 

Don Quixote

Ostrich
Orthodox Inquirer
Central America? I thought that a country like Mexico produces enough to have a surplus.
Mexico is somewhat dependent on the United States. They do produce quite a bit of food but when it comes to really important items like beef and corn they get it from us. The other Central American countries will be worse off than Mexico though.
 

LSD

Pigeon
Protestant
I'm sorry you must endure that prison colony. I pray for Australians all the time. Stay strong brother, it's one of the worst places in the world right now. I have no idea how I could survive there, except to find ways to live in the outback or something...?
We have a high standard of living and a strong welfare state, just like Scandinavian prisons, but not a single right (no right to remain silent even).
That combined with the fact Australia has never had to fight or die for freedom, keeps the population sedated and compliant with anything the government does since they do not want their comforts gone.

I do not know whether I should leave the country or move to the outback. I imagine that the outback is just as tyrannical as the cities or is headed that way.
My family is here though and I do not know how I could move away from them.

Really amazing just how full blown totalitarian Australia has gone. Dan Brown and Scomo are tyrannical dictators. They should be tarred and feathered. Same with Canada.
I do not actually hate Scomo. I do not care if he is enriching himself and his friends or being incompetent, he at the very least leaves me alone. I hate Labor more since their policies directly bother me. Such as vax mandates mainly, also trying to increase the already insane gun control (toy NERF guns must be registered with the police) and giving the police even more insane powers (certain tattoos are illegal, not swastikas yet, but motorcycle club logos), along with being the cause of the empty shelves and more.
 

Easy_C

Peacock
Keep a look at the expiration dates on food.

For storage the most cost efficient is to bulk order staples and use Myler + DE + Buckets to seal them. You can get a 20lb bag of rice for $12 at CostCo. Beans can be purchased retail for 1.25/lb at Dollar Tree.

So for $1,000 pre-tax you can get 1,000 lbs of rice and 320lbs of beans. It’ll take probably $400 or so for the storage supplies (near infinitely reusable).

Compare that to what it would cost to store that much food from one of those “Patriot Prepped” Places and let me know.
 

bubs

Robin
Protestant
Even if you live in a city/small apartment consider buying a chest freezer to stockpile quality meats and frozen veggies. Spring is coming, hit up local farmers markets and start talking and networking with the vendors to see where they are located (hopefully within an hour or so drive) and if you can become a regular customer to buy meats, eggs etc directly from them. Cut out the Big grocery and box stores as your source of food.
 

Easy_C

Peacock
Even if you live in a city/small apartment consider buying a chest freezer to stockpile quality meats and frozen veggies. Spring is coming, hit up local farmers markets and start talking and networking with the vendors to see where they are located (hopefully within an hour or so drive) and if you can become a regular customer to buy meats, eggs etc directly from them. Cut out the Big grocery and box stores as your source of food.
Dehydrating is an option as well. Rolling blackouts are a possibility and if you have everything in a freezer you lose it after a few days.
 

MartyMcFly

Ostrich
Other Christian
Even if you live in a city/small apartment consider buying a chest freezer to stockpile quality meats and frozen veggies. Spring is coming, hit up local farmers markets and start talking and networking with the vendors to see where they are located (hopefully within an hour or so drive) and if you can become a regular customer to buy meats, eggs etc directly from them. Cut out the Big grocery and box stores as your source of food.
You will likely have to haggle though to make sure they don't cheat you by stating their food is special because it is 'organic' and locally-grown.' Be sure to have local supermarket prices on hand to show them in case they try to charge a 200-300% markup vs. supermarkets. I think a lot of small farmers (and other businessmen) try to hustle people in the cities at farmer markets.

If they can get guaranteed business, they should be willing to negotiate fair prices.
 

TrifeLife

Woodpecker
You will likely have to haggle though to make sure they don't cheat you by stating their food is special because it is 'organic' and locally-grown.' Be sure to have local supermarket prices on hand to show them in case they try to charge a 200-300% markup vs. supermarkets. I think a lot of small farmers (and other businessmen) try to hustle people in the cities at farmer markets.

If they can get guaranteed business, they should be willing to negotiate fair prices.
The prices for meat, milk, grain, veggies that you find on your Kroger coupon page don't reflect the cost of producing food in a community scale setting. They are a result of government subsidies for things like corn and soy, economies of scale gained by Big Agriculture, and the deleterious agricultural practices that they utilize to maximize production. It's a lot cheaper to spray 100 acres of GMO mono-cropped produce with pesticides and herbicides than it is to replace these processes with labor and produce food without toxic chemicals or degradation to the land. There are parallels when it comes to raising livestock and dairy. There are prices that local producers must charge to remain economically viable. When one decides to accept those prices and pay up, they are in a sense investing in their local community and cutting out their support for the agriculture industrial complex. Whether or not this trade off is worth it is a personal choice one must make.
 

Easy_C

Peacock
Luxurious - in addition to coffee & tea. I recommend cigarettes. Consider how tobacco is traded inside the big house
Forgot to mention that.

It's obviously a lower priority, but alcohol and tobacco are good stocking items. I recommend keeping a pack or two of cigarettes and a small flask of drinking alcohol in your bug out bag. Both have practical uses beyond just consumption, will do a lot for your morale if you end up having to hike several days back home, and have enormous barter value (especially if you don't mind talking to the bums).
 
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