The Incoming Food Shortages

Maddox

Woodpecker
Protestant
I wonder if there's a way around food prepping in the US. Won't hotels have enough food to serve their guests during a catastrophe like this? I would think they'd have contracts in place with vendors where they are guaranteed food. If they can't serve their guests, they won't have guests. So that would be a top priority for them.

For those of us who don't own a house or have storage for 20-gallon-sized buckets in our apartments, or own chickens and rabbits, maybe this is an alternative.

And if US hotels can't provide this, why not just cross the border into Mexico? As long as other countries don't have the same issue, there's no good reason to stay here and try to weather this crap.
 

nordle

Sparrow
Catholic
If there are food shortages, there is historical precedent of the hotels having enough food for the extremely rich. During the siege of Paris, Christmas 1870, the animals in the zoo were sold for top dollar in the most exclusive hotels while the poor starved. But these are top tier hotels with very high prices already. I would not like to rely on a third party in this manner, myself.

During a food crisis in the states, you won't be the only gringo going south of the border and it would probably not be a pretty or easy sight.
 

Easy_C

Peacock
I wonder if there's a way around food prepping in the US. Won't hotels have enough food to serve their guests during a catastrophe like this? I would think they'd have contracts in place with vendors where they are guaranteed food. If they can't serve their guests, they won't have guests. So that would be a top priority for them.

For those of us who don't own a house or have storage for 20-gallon-sized buckets in our apartments, or own chickens and rabbits, maybe this is an alternative.

And if US hotels can't provide this, why not just cross the border into Mexico? As long as other countries don't have the same issue, there's no good reason to stay here and try to weather this crap.



The Crossing the border plan generally requires you to have your ducks in a row long before crap happens. See: Ukraine.

Hotel point has been addressed. Unfortunately, other countries are likely to have the same issues due to globalized supply chains.


I wrote a post a few months ago regarding the other obstacles. Short version is that you need to network effectively of figure out who you know that is like minded, and doesn't mind you using their property as a rally point.
 

rainy

Pelican
Other Christian
Best bet for meat I am hearing is rabbits. My in laws were discussing this and apparently they’re relatively easy to raise, can eat hay grass, and can be processed in a matter of minutes. If they’re young it’s nutritious whole meat that tastes like chicken.
My wife’s grandparents in Bulgaria always had rabbits on hand. Very easy to raise and care for.

Best soup I ever had was rabbit soup, in that village.
 

get2choppaaa

Hummingbird
Orthodox
I plan on raising a decent garden this year. In terms of food shortages, this is scary stuff. I keep thinking about the sensitivity factor to austerity in the US. We're not familiar with austerity, therefore, if there's even a modest decrease in living standards I think the reaction will be bad.
Finally buying a house surrounded in the country surrounded by corn where my wife and I can have a large garden and lambs, goats, pigs, chickens, rabbits, and citrus trees.
 

Easy_C

Peacock
I’ve had to back off the larger plot due to pricing reasons. Instead I’ve got a plot sufficient for a larger garden, chickens, and rabbits in one of those little micro-towns (post office, little general store, and a police station with a single car) surrounded by farmland.

I’m not realistically going to be able to support myself off of it but I’ve got two other considerations:

- I can’t both work my full time job and maintain a large enough plot yet

- Within my area the safest place to be is going to be in a cluster of like minded people. This particular town is one where most of the twenty or so houses show both signs of kids and some form of patriotic iconography. Everyone there is going to be at least not geriatric and likely on the same page, so my job is to subtly convey my skills.
 

get2choppaaa

Hummingbird
Orthodox
I’ve had to back off the larger plot due to pricing reasons. Instead I’ve got a plot sufficient for a larger garden, chickens, and rabbits in one of those little micro-towns (post office, little general store, and a police station with a single car) surrounded by farmland.

I’m not realistically going to be able to support myself off of it but I’ve got two other considerations:

- I can’t both work my full time job and maintain a large enough plot yet

- Within my area the safest place to be is going to be in a cluster of like minded people. This particular town is one where most of the twenty or so houses show both signs of kids and some form of patriotic iconography. Everyone there is going to be at least not geriatric and likely on the same page, so my job is to subtly convey my skills.
Yep in in the same boat. Can't afford upkeep of anything more than 2 acres (what I got) while keeping the corporate gig an hour away in town. I am just leveraging the benefits that this will offer in local trade as well as lifestyle skills for my kids.

This is enough my wife can manage most of the stuff and I can use the weekends to do the heavy work.

We will be sufficient such that we can have basic staples (eggs /fruit/goat milk) and have the option for occasional meat from the lambs/rabbits ect...

The fact that I'm surrounded by corn fields adds an extra layer of food and resources.

Frankly it's as much to get my kids out of the city where they are getting messed with for being white, and to give me some better lifestyle goals. We wanted 5 acres so we could have a cow... But there's already a pin on site. We can always fence in the property and put a cow on property... But would have to regularly add hay feed which would be rather expensive.
 

john_Jea

Sparrow
Other Christian
I’ve had to back off the larger plot due to pricing reasons. Instead I’ve got a plot sufficient for a larger garden, chickens, and rabbits in one of those little micro-towns (post office, little general store, and a police station with a single car) surrounded by farmland.
You could potentially rent some land in the area to keep pigs, goats or whatever you are interested in to get a feel for it without the big investment. It won't be as secure in a SHTF scenario but something to consider.

I would suggest something you can raise over the summer like pigs.
 

MeaningfulMan

Woodpecker
Catholic
I plan on raising a decent garden this year. In terms of food shortages, this is scary stuff. I keep thinking about the sensitivity factor to austerity in the US. We're not familiar with austerity, therefore, if there's even a modest decrease in living standards I think the reaction will be bad.
Expect gaslighting from liberals and their consumers;
- Why food lines are a good thing!
- 5 Reasons why Eating Less is More
- Complaining about Food Lines is White Supremacy
- Orgy in the Bread Line; My Experience
- Fighting for Trans Rights while waiting for Soup
 

Helmsman

Robin
Protestant
Torba: Another food chain plant on fire this weekend. Are you paying attention yet? PREPARE.

They are gearing up for another Holodomor. Prepare.



Soybean storage silo fire. The plant isn't offline. This kind of thing happens when handling large amounts of organic material. I volunteered at a VFD that covered a wood products plant. They constantly had small fires in their conveyors and silos and only called us if it was big. They had in-house resources. Part of doing business. In fact, in this article the plant manager says the fire will not have any effect on operations.

Plane crashing into a plant in GA? Suspicious. All those meat-packing fires? Very suspicious. This? Not at all.
 

paternos

Robin
Catholic
Interesting book I recently came across from the 1960's on leftist's planned famine in the United States as a tool.

This book is amazing, passionate writer, great knowledge on the farming sector and written in 1966 describing the coming on the socialist state.

It's incredible the world kept functioning for 50 years, this is not because of the government, but in spite of the government.

The things he wrote about farming we see today in several sector as energy.

Europe has been squeezing out oil producers, coal miners and even nuclear is fully socialized. France the NR1 nuclear energy producer has been shutting down plants for "checks" in the last months.

1240x-1.jpg

Similar trend in the last 20 years in Oil.
Oil-production-in-OECD-Europe.png

The same for coal


coal consumption and production.png
The same for Gas
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The same for birthrates with their range of options from condoms, pills and killing unborns.

doepkefig1.png

And in this thread we discuss food. How the governments/ rulers are completely controlling the farming industry already in 1966 it was big time, today is on a totally different level.

While output grew in farming for the last century caused by improved technology. They now see to go all the way to destroy farming outputs. Wether it's fertilizers, environment, municipal buyouts, solar panel fields, employment law constraints (who will work 12 hours a day milking cows?) or "organic small farm propaganda".

It seems they are going full on here now in Europe. In my opinion something very dark is taking place.

I think they want us dead.
 
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budoslavic

Eagle
Orthodox
Gold Member

Alarming Signs Farmers Reduce Fertilizer May Wreck Crop Yields​

There is growing concern farmers worldwide are reducing chemical fertilizer, which may threaten yields come harvest time, according to Bloomberg. The repercussions could be huge: Lower yields may exacerbate the food crisis.

There are alarming signs commercial farmers in top growing areas in the world are decreasing the use of essential nutrients — nitrogen, phosphorus, and potassium.

Revealed last week, SLC Agricola SA, one of Brazil's largest farming operations, managing fields of soybeans, corn, and cotton fields in an area larger than the state of Delaware, will reduce the use of fertilizer by 20% and 25%.

Coffee farmers in Brazil, Nicaragua, Guatemala, and Costa Rica, some of the largest coffee-producing countries, are expected to spread less fertilizer because of high costs and shortages. A coffee cooperative representing 1,200 farmers in Costa Rica predicts coffee output could slip 15% next year because of soaring fertilizer costs.

The International Fertilizer Development Center (IFDC) warned a reduction in fertilizer use would shrink yields of rice and corn come harvest time. Farmers in China, India, Bangladesh, Indonesia, and Vietnam — the largest rice-producing countries — are spreading less fertilizer, and may result in a 10% reduction in output, equating to about 36 million tons of rice, or enough food to feed a half billion people.

More fertilizer equals more food production; Less fertilizer equals lower food production. It's a simple concept to understand and may suggest an even larger food crisis is on the horizon.

The US won't be spared. Chairman of the Kansas Wheat Commission Gary Millershaski said his "biggest fear" this spring is that farmers in North America skip out on applying nitrogen to wheat plantings. He said, if farmers did, this might suggest harvests would be a "lower class of wheat."

In March, Tony Will, the chief executive of the world's largest nitrogen fertilizer company CF Industries Holdings Inc., warned: "My biggest concern is that we end up with a very severe shortage of food in certain areas of the world."

Rockefeller Foundation President Rajiv Shah provided Bloomberg Television's David Westin with a timeline of when the "massive, immediate food crisis" begins. He said, "in the next six months."
 

budoslavic

Eagle
Orthodox
Gold Member

Rockefeller Foundation President Starts Countdown Until All Hell Breaks Loose​

Rockefeller Foundation President Rajiv Shah told Bloomberg Television's David Westin a "massive, immediate food crisis" is on the horizon.

He said global fertilizer supply disruptions caused by the Russian invasion of Ukraine would have an "even worse" impact on the crisis, slashing crop yields worldwide.

Shah said debt relief and emergency aid for emerging market countries are needed to mitigate the effects of the food crisis.

Shah's appearance on Bloomberg is interesting because of the foundation's repetitive talk about the need for the global food supply to be reset to a more sustainable one. The foundation has closely aligned views with the World Economic Forum (WEF), advocating for a 'global reset'.

WEF founder Klaus Schwab famously said in early 2020, months after the virus pandemic began, "The pandemic represents a rare but narrow window of opportunity to reflect, reimagine, and reset our world to create a healthier, more equitable, and more prosperous future."

While Schwab and other global elites have been calling for a global reset, Rockefeller Foundation's managing director of Food Initiative Sara Farley has echoed the same message.

Farley's note published on WEF's website titled "How to reimagine our food systems for a post-COVID world" outlined the need to "redesign supply chains with nutrition and human health in mind."

Rockefeller Foundation's senior vice president of Food Initiative Roy Steiner recently said, "the world is spending far too much on foods that are bad for people and bad for the planet."

And what could Steiner likely be referring to? Ah yes, possibly cattle farming and how it uses massive amounts of natural resources, such as water and feed, to produce meat. WEF has advocated the need for the global food supply to inject insects into human diets.

Shah's timeline for the next food crisis is an ominous warning that elites will use the events as a perfect opportunity to implement their plan to begin the transformation of the food supply system. Meat becomes a delicacy for the rich while the working-poor are stuck eating insects and berries. The great reset is well underway.
 
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