The Kardiotissa Myrrh-Streaming Icon

Roosh

Cardinal
Orthodox
Originally posted on RooshV.com

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After a three-week stay at Holy Trinity Monastery, culminating with me being received into the Orthodox Church, my brain was overloaded with spiritual knowledge and a list of tasks I wanted to complete to begin learning about my new faith. I was ready and eager to go home. The only stop remaining was to meet Gab founder Andrew Torba on his homestead in Pennsylvania.

When I left the monastery, my godfather told me that the spiritual experiences would diminish. I would have to manage a transition from interacting daily with priests, monks, and seminarians who constantly strove to have Lord Jesus Christ in their hearts, with providential events occurring to me daily, to a bizarro secular world where people cared more about gay people than God. This transition was on my mind as I drove to Northeast Pennsylvania to meet with Andrew Torba and his family.

Torba and I got along immediately. We are both fighting the good fight and have the same enemies. His enemy list, however, is much longer than mine since he is providing a platform that reaches many millions of people each month. We exchanged war stories over dinner and then lunch the next day. During one of our conversations, he asked me if I heard of the myrrh-streaming icon that was in a nearby Orthodox church. I had heard of myrrh-streaming icons before, whereby an icon leaks myrrh, but I was not interested in seeing it because of fatigue. I repeat: I was not interested in seeing a miracle within my new Church because I was tired, and besides, myrrh-streaming icons may not stream continually. Maybe I could visit it during a future trip. When Torba, who is not in the Orthodox Church, mentioned the icon to me a second time, I gently ignored him and changed the subject.

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The day before I was set to drive back home, Torba showed me his land and farm machinery, which made me jealous because I own practically nothing useful besides electronic equipment to conduct internet live streams. I went back to my hotel room and checked my email. I read one from an Orthodox man who suggested that, if I were ever in Northeast Pennsylvania, to check out the Kardiotissa myrrh-streaming icon. I had not publicly shared that I would be in Pennsylvania. Why was I being told to visit this icon by two men within a 24-hour period? I leaned back from the computer screen and thought for some time before concluding that the email suggestion was from God, as was Torba’s. I can only remain turned away from God for so long when he speaks to me, so I picked up the phone and called St. George’s Orthodox Church in Taylor, Pennsylvania. I was invited to Vespers the next day at 6pm to see the icon. I extended my hotel stay and messaged Torba to join me.

I met with Torba in front of the church at the appointed time. I did not expect the icon to be streaming. I simply wanted to venerate the icon and ask the Theotokos to pray for me. Torba and I walked into the church and stood in the back row on the right side. As Vespers began, I looked around the church but did not know where the icon was. I would have to wait until the service was over. As hymn after hymn was sung praising the Theotokos, I wondered what Torba was thinking, since his background was in Protestantism, where the Theotokos often seems relegated to the role of a surrogate baby donor.

After Vespers was completed, the priest said the icon was not streaming and then motioned towards it, located in the center of the church. The usher then released one row of parishioners at a time to get in line to venerate the icon, starting at the front. Our row was eventually released and I waited in line, which moved quickly. When I finally arrived at the icon, I venerated it by kissing the Mother of God’s hand and shoulder through the glass. Then a priestmonk anointed me with the icon’s myrrh on my forehead.

Many of the faithful left but I felt the urge to stay. I circled around the entire church to return to the front to venerate the other icons. Then I sat in a front pew and stared at the Kardiotissa for a minute before the usher came up to me and asked, “Did you see the streaks of myrrh?”

“I didn’t look carefully,” I replied, and stood up. Before I could take a step towards the icon for a closer view, the priest took it out of its glass case and held it in the air at a titled angle. It had just started streaming. A woman in front of me approached the icon and placed her right hand underneath. I watched as a bead formed in the bottom corner of the thin-slabbed wooden icon and dropped onto her hands. The priest turned the icon towards me and I approached with my hand. A drop of myrrh landed in my hands and I immediately made the sign of the cross, giving glory to God for allowing me to experience the miracle. I looked towards the back of the church and saw Torba. I motioned for him to come and he also received a drop of myrrh.

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The Kardiotissa myrrh-streaming icon

I returned to the pews in the back. I could not hold back tears. I knew I was experiencing God’s grace and so began to pray for all those I loved, hoping that my prayer at this moment would have more power. Torba came to sit beside me. I didn’t make eye contact with him so as not to disturb any moment he was experiencing. The grace was heavy so I could not talk, but I managed to whisper to him, “It’s just a piece of wood.”

Tens of thousands of Orthodox Christians have experienced myrrh-streaming icons firsthand, and it’s not hard to find their stories, but to be there myself, to watch drops of liquid fragrance come forth from inert wood and paint bearing an image of the Theotokos; to watch the earthly intersection between the Uncreated and Created, only possible because of the providential steps that allowed me to be present in Taylor, Pennsylvania, made me feel an overflowing love for God and the Mother of God, for it had only been three weeks since I was received into the Church. I saw how God was allowing my faith to start strong, and how lucky Torba was for seeing this miracle when he wasn’t even in the Church, and what sort of plan God had for us both.

“God arranged this,” I said to Torba. “He wanted us to see this together.” I stared at a large Orthodox cross in the front of the church, trying to retain the feeling of grace, but the tears soon ended and back out into the world I went, retaining only a memory of what had happened.

Less than four months later, the Lord God showed me the wonderworking Kursk Root icon and then another myrrh-streaming icon, the Hawaiian Iveron icon. The more I see and the more grace that falls upon me, the more unworthy I feel, the sinner that I am.

Read Next: 12 Things I Learned From Visiting Holy Trinity Monastery In New York
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Prores

Sparrow
Orthodox
That’s wonderful, glory to God. I got a chance to see the myrrh streaming Iveron icon a few months ago and it was very powerful. No one wanted to leave the church, the further you got away from the icon, the more of the coldness of the world you could feel. There was a crowd around the icon of the Theotokos bowing and praying for many hours.

I saw a man from another parish there who I’ve had some disagreements with ( and would generally avoid ) and I felt a great love for him. I looked at him and just saw an icon of Christ. It was like love and grace was flowing into the church and blessing all of those there who would accept it.

Like Roosh, I wasn’t sure if it would be an edifying experience and didn’t expect what happened. But we only expect what we already know, and it was outside of my previous experiences.
 

MrBAD

Chicken
Orthodox
My mother passed away unexpectedly in early November 2017. It was only about 8 months after I had begun my Orthodox instruction classes. But I had no feelings of peace about her passing. I prayed for her soul continuously, lit candles for her every Sunday. And still, no peace. Time went on, I was received into the Church. In October of 2019 my Orthodox cousin and his wife came to visit me from Texas and to be our witnesses as my wife and I had our marriage blessed by the Church. During his stay we visited St Tikhons monastery in Elysburg PA. While there a seminary student told us about a wonder working icon of the Theotokos in the chapel. So we went in to see and venerate them. And I prayed to the Theotokos to help my mother's soul find peace. And as we left the chapel a great sense of relief passed over me. And I knew that her soul was at peace. For the first time in 2 years I had peace over her soul. It is just a piece of wood. But sometimes it takes a piece of wood to illicit the faith we need in the mercy of God.
 
Originally posted on RooshV.com

I wondered what Torba was thinking, since his background was in Protestantism, where the Theotokos often seems relegated to the role of a surrogate baby donor.

I thank God that such a disagreement isn't damnable at the very least. Given that Torba is shown to be saved as you are saved.

I think I like Torba and other saved Protestants may have some things wrong. But God is gracious. And his Holy Spirit isn't withheld from us.

I will have to deal with the facts when I get there if I don't manage to get it right here.
 

Cleotis

Sparrow
Orthodox Inquirer
I did click on the link in Roosh’s article to website of St. George’s Orthodox Church in Taylor, Pennsylvania. I was dismayed to find the most conspicuous feature of the church’s homepage is the following list of “restrictions, changes, and guidelines”, prominently displayed front, bold, and center in large, unmistakable letters:

Fr. Leasure's letter opened the church doors effective June 7. Restrictions, changes, and guidelines include:
  • Social distancing is in effect.
  • Only every 2nd row of pews are used.
  • Families may sit together.
  • Others should separate by at least 6 feet.
  • Seating is limited.
  • Wearing a mask is required.
  • If you feel ill stay home.
  • Hand sanitizers are available and should be used.
  • Pews and surfaces are sanitized before services.

Right above that (in smaller, unobtrusive font):

Ask about our delicious home made perogie, ethnic and lenten food sales.
We have a beautiful catering hall for weddings and other events.
Click here for more information.
Call 570-562-2090 570-562-1170​

It just struck me as … oh, I don’t know … incongruous (?) that this church is blessed to be home to a renown myrrh-streaming, miracle working icon of Our Lady that Roosh wrote so poignantly about and had such. a beautiful grace-filled experience with. Yet, if we’re judging strictly from their website, it would seem the church still has much more worldly priorities priorities: namely, (1) enforcing insane COVID rules that are even austere compared with what the vast majority of churches in the U.S. currently have (2) pierogies and homemade ethnic food, (3) advertising their beautiful catering hall (!) rental as though they were some kind of civic/social organization like an Elks Club Lodge, a Knights of Columbus, an American Legion post, the VFW, etc. It’s disconcerting that people could experience a supernatural event like this, but the focus on COVID rules still indicates a lack of supernatural faith that ought to be the resulting fruit from it, just doesn’t seem to jive, at all. It’s disconcerting.
 
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Mountaineer

Ostrich
Gold Member
I hate to ask this question but is there any possibility of this being a trick? The miracle icon I mean. I can imagine that someone of ill will could prepare the icon with a tiny nozzle and reservoir. I would not stand it if that were to be a work of a trickster. Are there any documented occurrences of fake miracle icons?
 

christie2

Sparrow
Woman
This is a valuable and beautiful miracle to read about.

I understand Cleotis and Mountaineer"s concerns too.


I am currently struggling with some witnessing of creepiness/corruption and the lens I view the rest of the world, including my faith, becomes tarnished.

It is a test, Cleotis and Mountaineer!!


It is very good that you are both cautious and redpilled to question, and for very good reasons--you both have discerning observations--- but there comes a point where surrendering to the possibility of Good and Grace can still obliterate any doubts and suspicion of priests and churches and the coming down of the Holy Spirit.

Just let the doubts and suspicions stay silent and be open to the Spirit.

If these thoughts truly bother you, it could mean you are called to go help that Church in person. Called to show brave leadership by your example.

I see both in this article and thread comments. The miracle he
experienced and the distrust of forum redpillers.

Really opening yourself up to believing and being open, is such a humbling and trusting thing to do.
Being stronger than what is perceived as creepy or corrupt, will reward you with many miracles and protection and Love from God. I just wrote that for myself, I think.

It is all a test!! The tests come more rapidly and harder the more you submit. Its crazy.

Thanks to Roosh for sharing. (Please don't include this comment in your website with this article, please just leave the comment here, thank you.)
 

Cavalier

Robin
Orthodox Catechumen
I did click on the link in Roosh’s article to website of St. George’s Orthodox Church in Taylor, Pennsylvania. I was dismayed to find the most conspicuous feature of the church’s homepage is the following list of “restrictions, changes, and guidelines”, prominently displayed front, bold, and center in large, unmistakable letters:



Right above that (in smaller, unobtrusive font):



It just struck me as … oh, I don’t know … incongruous (?) that this church is blessed to be home to a renown myrrh-streaming, miracle working icon of Our Lady that Roosh wrote so poignantly about and had such. a beautiful grace-filled experience with. Yet, if we’re judging strictly from their website, it would seem the church still has much more worldly priorities priorities: namely, (1) enforcing insane COVID rules that are even austere compared with what the vast majority of churches in the U.S. currently have (2) pierogies and homemade ethnic food, (3) advertising their beautiful catering hall (!) rental as though they were some kind of civic/social organization like an Elks Club Lodge, a Knights of Columbus, an American Legion post, the VFW, etc. It’s disconcerting that people could experience a supernatural event like this, but the focus on COVID rules still indicates a lack of supernatural faith that ought to be the resulting fruit from it, just doesn’t seem to jive, at all. It’s disconcerting.
Maybe they have to follow COVID rules or be closed by the Commie State. As far as advertising pierogies and their catering hall, churches need funds to operate.
 

Edelweiss

Sparrow
Orthodox Inquirer
Maybe they have to follow COVID rules or be closed by the Commie State. As far as advertising pierogies and their catering hall, churches need funds to operate.
This.

I attend a Russian Orthodox Church in Germany (I am catholic but enquiring about Orthodoxy) and on the website they state similar rules, even registration online before attending Liturgy
However, in the church in reality, other than a poster on the door stating the rules again, they are not applied, no social distancing, I never registered, almost no masks (a few have them, but it is their personal choice), communion with one and same spoon, packed liturgy where you can't move around in the Church, no control, nothing.
I see families with 2-3 children every Sunday (something you seldom see on the secular streets of Germany). Even the Vespers are well attended.

Whereas in my Catholic Church: no entrance without prior registration, you are then assigned a seat with your name on it, like in a theatre, masks all the time, even the priest...Needless to say, I am converting! (obviously not due to "sanitary rules" alone)
 

Ah_Tibor

Kingfisher
Woman
Orthodox
I hate to ask this question but is there any possibility of this being a trick? The miracle icon I mean. I can imagine that someone of ill will could prepare the icon with a tiny nozzle and reservoir. I would not stand it if that were to be a work of a trickster. Are there any documented occurrences of fake miracle icons?

Yes. There was the court case in Blanco, TX (with the monks who were not particularly monastic) where it was done with an eye dropper.

I would say most, if not all, are pious fakes. The prayers, the suffering, and the outpouring of emotion are real. It is often hard to get people to go to Vespers or a Moleben but weeping icons will bring out hundreds of people.

I don't mean to derail this thread. (Ready for the angry reacts.) I also do not mean to offend anyone, or accuse anyone in particular of forgery. I think this the thought process behind stuff like the moon landing, too. "YES we killed countless people in rockets, so wouldn't it better to pull off this event that unites people in peace and harmony and puts America back on top?"
 

Roosh

Cardinal
Orthodox
I hate to ask this question but is there any possibility of this being a trick? The miracle icon I mean. I can imagine that someone of ill will could prepare the icon with a tiny nozzle and reservoir. I would not stand it if that were to be a work of a trickster. Are there any documented occurrences of fake miracle icons?
I would say most, if not all, are pious fakes.
"Immediately the father of the child cried out and said with tears, 'Lord, I believe; help my unbelief!'"
 

Ah_Tibor

Kingfisher
Woman
Orthodox
"Immediately the father of the child cried out and said with tears, 'Lord, I believe; help my unbelief!'"

Thank you, Roosh. I am always willing to be wrong. I am speaking from my own experiences.

(My own church claims to have a weeping icon that started up when the plandemic started.)

I think there is a danger with putting a lot of one's faith in small "miracles" because there can be a loss of faith if it turns out not to be true. I struggled a lot with this growing up-- Orthodox seem to be particularly suspectible to small things, ranging from "take the wrapper off or it's not blessed" to "snakes like this church."

Some of it is just human and I think accepting our irrational nature is part of maturing.

I am glad you enjoyed your time in PA. It's a good place to be.
 

IconWriter

Sparrow
Woman
Orthodox
Myrrhstreaming, even myrrh-GUSHING icons are real manifestations of God's grace. I've witnessed them several times, up close, and have close friends, who are nuns and priests, who have also. There is no way these can be faked. I had one in my home. They are picked up, examined, held. They are heavily fragrant (like a million roses) and the oil keeps flowing, sometimes soaking the clothing of the person holding and the cloth underneath on a stand. We don't understand it, but we humbly accept it. Prayers are answered and miracle healings occur. If these events are bothersome to unbelievers wait until they learn of the Holy Fire miracle at Pascha. God can bless what He wants to bless and how He wants to bless.
 

Elicola

Pigeon
Why does a myrrh streaming matter? If you have faith in the creator, then a little bit of myrrh is nothing. You should not need another miracle to have faith. If that icon turns out to be fake, it should not weaken your faith.

I worry that obsession with miraculous icons crosses the line from veneration to idolatry.
 

Maria530

Chicken
Woman
Orthodox
Myrrhstreaming, even myrrh-GUSHING icons are real manifestations of God's grace. I've witnessed them several times, up close, and have close friends, who are nuns and priests, who have also. There is no way these can be faked. I had one in my home. They are picked up, examined, held. They are heavily fragrant (like a million roses) and the oil keeps flowing, sometimes soaking the clothing of the person holding and the cloth underneath on a stand. We don't understand it, but we humbly accept it. Prayers are answered and miracle healings occur. If these events are bothersome to unbelievers wait until they learn of the Holy Fire miracle at Pascha. God can bless what He wants to bless and how He wants to bless.
Amen ☦️
 

Maria530

Chicken
Woman
Orthodox
Why does a myrrh streaming matter? If you have faith in the creator, then a little bit of myrrh is nothing. You should not need another miracle to have faith. If that icon turns out to be fake, it should not weaken your faith.

I worry that obsession with miraculous icons crosses the line from veneration to idolatry.
God works in mysterious ways my dear, perhaps the myrrh streaming icon can help strengthen the faith of one person while melting the cold heart of the person standing next to them and making them into a believer. We don’t know why he gives us the gift of myrrh streaming icons but we humbly accept it☦️
 
I'm glad you felt encouraged by this experience, Roosh. I like you. Your live streams keep me company. I agree with you about the rampant corruption in this world - and how it continues to grow worse. I agree that the (((Khazarian Mafia))) and their lord Satan are behind it all. And yet, behind Lucifer is God - allowing him and his demons to perpetrate unthinkable evil on His image bearers.

I don't know about the Orthodox church, but in the Protestant churches, excuses for God all always made. Since He is light and no darkness resides in Him, he could not possibly be responsible for all the bad stuff. Even in Reformed circles, where they freely confess "whatsoever happens was pre-ordained by God TO happen." For God is sovereign over ALL things. From our human perspective, we have free will. Arminians worship free will.

But just as other animals, plants and organisms do what they do because of their programming, I believe humans do the same. You feel called to earn your salvation, whereas I feel called to thank god for saving me. Christ Jesus paid for my sins on the cross and then the Holy Spirit drew me to Himself in my 20s. Justification, Sanctification and soon Glorification. https://www.gty.org/library/bibleqnas-library/QA0141/what-does-it-mean-to-work-out-your-salvation
 
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