The Knees Over Toes Guy

So, your workouts primarily consist of leg work, with some light upper body? Don't mean to question, everybody's workout needs to be tailored to their needs, but isn't your program too leg-heavy?
I bench heavy once a week, and light once a week.
I focus on back on Saturdays.
I hit military heavy once a week, and light once a week.

With my slight build, at my age, I often wonder if I am not over doing it. Both upper and lower body.
 
Of all the great free videos he has posted, this one is the most inspirational. It has changed my outlook on life a little. Maybe we don't have to get old and slow down, we can keep going until our health fades us. We can live into our 60's and 70's with flexibility, mobility, and without chronic joint pain. I am just short of following this routine for 3 months. It has changed how I view weight training and fitness, all of which I started in March of 1994. For the first time ever I actual feel stronger when I am standing or walking. Before I just knew I was stronger because I would lift heavier weights than previously. But there really wasn't any functional difference. Which makes me think of two things...

#1) Lifting weights for decades on end, yet struggling as much as any other person lifting heavy furniture and my mom saying "I thought you lifted weights". Heh, I do, I guess it really isn't doing me any good.

#2) A personal trainer I know decided to redo his ground/brick patio one summer. It wore him out enough he quit lifting for the 2 months it took. He told me after those 2 months he was never in better shape. The manual labor of having to carry bricks, and bend over, and out in the sun gave him better results and a better looking body that decades in the gym had done.

Anyway, without further ado here is the video...

 

fireshark

Woodpecker
Orthodox Inquirer
I literally just came here to see if there was a thread on this guy and his workouts, and to make a thread on it if there wasn't one.

I found his YT channel 3 weeks ago when searching for ways to reduce knee pain when doing squats. I learned his story, learned the methodology of his workout program, and I'm blown away. I'm in my mid-30s now, and this is the year I've started to feel my age a bit. I've always been somewhat unconventional when it comes to workouts, I mainly prefer calisthenics, and aside from a couple years in college, I've never been a gym rat.

I found his whole attitude of building from the ground up by improving quality of life and functional mobility very refreshing. Obviously the guy is strong, but strength is more like a byproduct of his exercises than the sole purpose of them. Even in the calisthenics world where people are much more open to things like mobility and stretching routines, no one has ever integrated everything in such a comprehensive, powerful and meaningful way as this guy has, that I'm aware of.

I don't like getting into programs and not being sure of what I'm doing and causing imbalances or injuries, so I have payed for one month of his program (which is $25 with a coupon code) and just finished my first week. I'm really impressed with it so far.

Zero to Dense to Standards is a 9 month cycle that repeats. He purposely doesn't train with heavy weights for at least 3-6 months out of every year in order to reduce wear and tear on the body.

I've started in Zero, but even in my first week I can do many of the Dense exercises. However in some exercises my mobility is terrible and I'm gonna need at least 4 weeks of Zero for those. I feel considerably better blood flow and less tension in my body since starting back on Monday. I've always has terrible flexibility in my hamstrings and this is the first program that has ever given me hope on that front.

"Lengthening is strengthening" - If you have tight shriveled muscles that never get worked or stretched properly, no amount of giant big boy lifts is going to help you avoid injury or have full mobility, especially into old age. This program really looks like it has the potential to make you bulletproof, improve your life, and likely save you years of pain, inability to do things you love, and future medical bills. I'm testing that now. So far , so good.
 
@fireshark liking my posts today reminded me of this thread. So I want to give an update. I have been piecing together my own workout and changing things as I test with my own body. I have not paid for the program yet, but I feel between my extensive history or working out and watching the free videos I have a decent idea of what I need to do.

4 months in I feel great. I feel like I am in my 20's again. I am more flexible than ever before. My back pain has greatly decreased and only flares up when I have to bend into awkward positions for extended periods of time. I am probably about 2 inches away from my highest vertical leap in my 40's. When I walk I feel stronger. I know my posture is better.

This inspired me to clean up my diet more. The only carbs I consume are fruit, veggies, and brown rice. So my body fat percentage is probably the lowest it has been since my mid 30's.

This has thus inspired me to think bigger and dream bigger and stress less.

With my thin frame and long joints, I believe lifting about 30 minutes each workout, 6 times a week is the best. But this might change.

Mondays I take off, due to working 2 jobs and needing to rest after the weekends.
Tuesday - Heavier legs (more focus on lifting) but still only 30 minutes worth.
Wednesday - Pushing (Bench, Military) 30 minutes
Thursday - Jumping drills/sprints / calves
Friday - Pulling (Pullups/Rows/Curls) 30 minutes
Saturday - Jump testing (max jumps and then some lifting)
Sunday - Push/Pull, which is Bench/Pullups but with lighter weight/higher reps.
 
Another week update, quickly.

Most importantly, if anyone is having knee pain or discomfort, walk backwards. 3 times a week for 15 minutes if you can. It works, it is an old remedy in the Eastern World for knee health and it works.

Every week I feel better with these exercises. More flexibility and less joint/back pain.

With my long and thin build I was a natural one foot jumper. Two foot jumpers are usually shorter legs with a thicker build. Long lean guys are often one foot jumpers. After college I didn't play basketball for about 4 years. In that time I just lifted weights. When I played again I could no longer jump off one foot. I didn't mind, I could jump higher off two feet from lifting weights. But it never came back, it always felt awkward.

KneesOverToes requires you jump off all four plants, so I was forced to jump off one foot. And it was really weak when I started in March and continued to be weak for the first 3 months. Finally it started to get better. Today for the first time since I was 22 I jumped higher off one foot than off both feet.
 

PUA_Rachacha

Woodpecker
Another week update, quickly.

Most importantly, if anyone is having knee pain or discomfort, walk backwards. 3 times a week for 15 minutes if you can. It works, it is an old remedy in the Eastern World for knee health and it works.

Every week I feel better with these exercises. More flexibility and less joint/back pain.

With my long and thin build I was a natural one foot jumper. Two foot jumpers are usually shorter legs with a thicker build. Long lean guys are often one foot jumpers. After college I didn't play basketball for about 4 years. In that time I just lifted weights. When I played again I could no longer jump off one foot. I didn't mind, I could jump higher off two feet from lifting weights. But it never came back, it always felt awkward.

KneesOverToes requires you jump off all four plants, so I was forced to jump off one foot. And it was really weak when I started in March and continued to be weak for the first 3 months. Finally it started to get better. Today for the first time since I was 22 I jumped higher off one foot than off both feet.
Can you be more specific on the ATG exercises that you're performing as part of your routine, with links to YT videos if possible?
 
Can you be more specific on the ATG exercises that you're performing as part of your routine, with links to YT videos if possible?
I started to feel very tired and strained my back doing routine things, so I realized I was over training. I have a very bad habit of over training and a body that is very suspect to over training + I am in my 40's. I have to watch it.

I do mostly the same leg workout 3 times a week. One is if I have to workout indoors and the other is if I can workout outdoors.

Outdoors (preferred)
- ROKP - reverse out knee pain. I run uphill backwards.
- Sprint uphill. Usually 3 or 4 of these. Enough to get the blood flowing good.
- Vertical Jumps - jump off all 4 plants until I feel tired. This is usually after 4 rounds of 4 plants.
- ATG Split Squat x1
- Nordics x1
- Seated hyperextensions x1
- Tibialis raises x1
- Calve raises and knee over toe calve raises x1

Indoors
- Lunge jumps x2
- One leg sprint exercise x3
- Vertical Jumps with ankle weights (so I don't hit the ceiling) x3
- High box squats x1
- Ramp board squats x1
- ATG Split Squats x1
- Nordics x1
- Single leg hip flexor raises x2
- Seated hyperextensions x1
- Tibialis raises x1
- Calve raises and knee over toe calve raises x1

And then once a week I do pushing exercises (bench, military) and another day I do back (pullups, backrows).

He has great videos on how to do these exercises on his Youtube channel.
 

Cartographer

Pelican
Gold Member
This is really cool stuff. I just started doing some of the exercises yesterday. The trail I walk nearby is usually empty. Of course, the day I decide to walk backwards for 15 minutes it's suddenly got more people than I've ever seen. :laughter:

I've always felt weird while squatting too, but sometimes I feel like I hit the sweet spot and I'll notice I'm extending past my toes. I've usually stayed with high reps and light weight or used the leg press because of it. The guy's leap is insane...not to mention how he can stop so quickly. Looking forward to pulling that move out in a pickup game someday.
 
This is really cool stuff. I just started doing some of the exercises yesterday. The trail I walk nearby is usually empty. Of course, the day I decide to walk backwards for 15 minutes it's suddenly got more people than I've ever seen. :laughter:

I've always felt weird while squatting too, but sometimes I feel like I hit the sweet spot and I'll notice I'm extending past my toes. I've usually stayed with high reps and light weight or used the leg press because of it. The guy's leap is insane...not to mention how he can stop so quickly. Looking forward to pulling that move out in a pickup game someday.
Yes, it took about 25 years of trying to squat every way imaginable and hurting myself deadlifting before I realized my legs were too long in proportion to my upper body thanks to KOT videos.

I owe this man so much. It is like I finally found what works for me after 3 decades of beating my head against the wall. I hope I can save others the decades of frustration and depression that comes with failing at weightlifting because the “experts” can’t understand that not all the traditional lifts work for everyone.
 
Yes, it took about 25 years of trying to squat every way imaginable and hurting myself deadlifting before I realized my legs were too long in proportion to my upper body thanks to KOT videos.

I owe this man so much. It is like I finally found what works for me after 3 decades of beating my head against the wall. I hope I can save others the decades of frustration and depression that comes with failing at weightlifting because the “experts” can’t understand that not all the traditional lifts work for everyone.

I guess for those who are on the fence or not understanding what I am saying, think of it like this...

Could Kevin Durant even preform a back squat with a bar on this back? I doubt he could, if he could it would look so awkward and so risky that everyone would tell him to rack the weight. If he were to add this lift, along with traditional deadlifts to his routine, he would not only miss out on exercises that would be greater benefit to him but also would eventually get injured. How does that do him any good.

And Kevin Durant is one of the best and highest paid athletes in the world.

This is probably true for a lot of guys in the NBA. They have very long limbs because it is a huge advantage in basketball. Being tall is a must, but having longs limbs and a shorter torso WITH the NBA height is what really sets them apart. They can reach and take up larger amounts of space than someone more conventionally built. And those guys are some of the best athletes in the world and incredible strong, just not in traditional lifting measures.

All in all, if you put a broomstick on your back in the back squat location and you can correctly perform a squat to at least parallel, and you can deadlift the broomstick off the floor keeping your back from rounding and without hitting your knees, then the traditional lifts will probably work great for you. I would high recommend these tried and true ways of gaining strength. After years of struggling and getting hurt, I realized I couldn't pass these tests due to my long limbs. The broomstick would hit my knee caps on a deadlift. The squat would require me to either over extend my lower back or to put all the weight directly on my knees. So I have been blessed to find alternative programs that are working way better for me and my lanky build.
 
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get2choppaaa

Ostrich
I guess for those who are on the fence or not understanding what I am saying, think of it like this...

Could Kevin Durant even preform a back squat with a bar on this back? I doubt he could, if he could it would look so awkward and so risky that everyone would tell him to rack the weight. If he were to add this lift, along with traditional deadlifts to his routine, he would not only miss out on exercises that would be greater benefit to him but also would eventually get injured. How does that do him any good.

And Kevin Durant is one of the best and highest paid athletes in the world.

This is probably true for a lot of guys in the NBA. They have very long limbs because it is a huge advantage in basketball. Being tall is a must, but having longs limbs and a shorter torso WITH the NBA height is what really sets them apart. They can reach and take up larger amounts of space than someone more conventionally built. And those guys are some of the best athletes in the world and incredible strong, just not in traditional lifting measures.

All in all, if you put a broomstick on your back in the back squat location and you can correctly perform a squat to at least parallel, and you can deadlift the broomstick off the floor keeping your back from rounding and without hitting your knees, then the traditional lifts will probably work great for you. I would high recommend these tried and true ways of gaining strength. After years of struggling and getting hurt, I realized I couldn't pass these tests due to my long limbs. The broomstick would hit my knee caps on a deadlift. The squat would require me to either over extend my lower back or to put all the weight directly on my knees. So I have been blessed to find alternative programs that are working way better for me and my lanky build.
Glad you've got something that works and I think this guys content is helpful for a lot of people, seems like it's been a game changer for you.

As far as squat and deadlift go, plenty of lanky lifters lift big weights. I think someone who actually knee how to coach the squat or deadlift could have helped significantly.

Usually back pain from these two movements had to do with abdominal weaknesses and the ubiquitous butt wink in the squat, or allowing the bar to drift too far forward of your midline in the deadlift while not knowing how to maintain a proper bracing technique with the obliques and abs.

There is a guy, named Collier Wolliam (he pulls Sumo) who fits the build you talk about and deadlifts over 900 lbs.

Not trying to poo poo your routine, just think it's worth noting that a lot of people don't know how to properly execute the squat or deadlift relative to their biomechanical leverages and hurt themselves because of it. I did this myself for a long time before I learned to sit back and squat with a more vertical shin or to deadlift with a better brace technique and to understand the correct form.

Also something you could implement for knee pain is sled dragging. Most People don't have any clue how good that is for your stength and also at providing traction for your back while still developing glutes hams and calves and also building the knee and quads if you reverse drag.

I did see the KOT guy on a podcast. His program isn't for me, but he does seem genuinely enthusiastic about wanting to help people and apparently what he does is helpful to a lot, so I can appreciate that.
 
Glad you've got something that works and I think this guys content is helpful for a lot of people, seems like it's been a game changer for you.

As far as squat and deadlift go, plenty of lanky lifters lift big weights. I think someone who actually knee how to coach the squat or deadlift could have helped significantly.

Usually back pain from these two movements had to do with abdominal weaknesses and the ubiquitous butt wink in the squat, or allowing the bar to drift too far forward of your midline in the deadlift while not knowing how to maintain a proper bracing technique with the obliques and abs.

There is a guy, named Collier Wolliam (he pulls Sumo) who fits the build you talk about and deadlifts over 900 lbs.

Not trying to poo poo your routine, just think it's worth noting that a lot of people don't know how to properly execute the squat or deadlift relative to their biomechanical leverages and hurt themselves because of it. I did this myself for a long time before I learned to sit back and squat with a more vertical shin or to deadlift with a better brace technique and to understand the correct form.

Also something you could implement for knee pain is sled dragging. Most People don't have any clue how good that is for your stength and also at providing traction for your back while still developing glutes hams and calves and also building the knee and quads if you reverse drag.

I did see the KOT guy on a podcast. His program isn't for me, but he does seem genuinely enthusiastic about wanting to help people and apparently what he does is helpful to a lot, so I can appreciate that.
My back literally gave out deadlifting a 90% of a 3 rep max set. Nothing spectacular. I simply cannot keep my back in the correct position and lift a bar off the floor and up my shins without having to travel through my knee cap. I was slightly going out of position to get around my knee and unaware of this fact. Eventually after 5 years of doing the lift one day out of no where my back gave out. It was scary and I have had back pain since. This was in 2006. I still struggle to just pick up random 50 to 100 lbs. things off the floor.

I wish I had a hex bar to work with, but now I am getting much better results doing ATG Split Squats and Nordics anyway.

I do agree on coaching, I would highly recommend it to everyone trying to learn these very complex and risky (if not done correctly) lifts.

Yes, ATG has sled dragging and is highly recommended for knee pain. I don't have access to a sled so I run up hills backwards. Actually ATG recommends doing the sled while pulling it backwards, much like me running up hills backwards.

It seems you are both in very good physical health (no injuries) and well built for traditional lifts. At least what I read from your posts. Anyone in your situation, anyone reading this, should stick to conventional lifts if you can. They have stood the test of time for a good reason. I wish I could do them. I guess I did do them for 25 years and I realize I was about to be done working out until I just stumbled upon his youtube channel and now I can do things I haven't been able to do since my 20's.
 
I also want to make this point very clear...

I am not a paid subscriber to his program nor am I affiliated with his company whatsoever. I just have found something that has unlocked years of frustration and depression.

I don't pay for his program for two main reasons...

#1) I don't have any knee injuries, which seems to be his main focus. So my training is taking his exercises and putting together a plan that is more about functional strength, measured through vertical leap and sprinting ability.

#2) I have financial issues, well detailed in other discussions, and I prefer to not spend my money on it right now.

Also, your first step should be to get a lifting coach and try traditional deadlifts and squats. These are time tested king of body exercises for a reason. I am a huge fan of them and I believe they work extremely well for most people. Unfortunately I don't seem to be one of them.
 

fireshark

Woodpecker
Orthodox Inquirer
I completed 1 month of the paid program ($25 w/coupon) and then cancelled my subscription for now. Overall, I'm very happy with it. I only cancelled in the interest of being frugal because the price increases to $50 after the first month. While cancelling will end your access to the daily planning / training app (mostly a convenience thing) and access to an online coach, there's nothing stopping you from simply taking notes of all the workout plans and using them yourself, which is what I plan to do for at least the next 3-6 months. Because you get unlimited access to all the plans and training info, and you can have your form critiqued at least once by a coach, I'd say its very well worth paying for at least 1 month. During my month I also noticed that Ben made some alterations to some of the programs, so it may be worth joining again for another month down the road just to see how he has tweaked things. (surprisingly they said I could join again in the future for $25 initially)

Regarding the program itself, there's three levels - Zero, Dense and Standards, in that order. I started at the bottom with the Zero program, which is 12 weeks. Initially I thought I might try to speed ahead and just do 3-4 weeks, but I realized after a couple weeks that's probably not a good idea.

Zero is largely focused on simple bodyweight exercises and stretching, and wow does my body need the stretching. That's the biggest reason why I'm not speeding ahead. On some of the stretches I'm still nowhere close to the Standard level. that being said, I've noticed massive changes in my overall level of flexibility. For the first time since probably high school, I can bend straight down and touch my toes without bending my knees at all, and do it repeatedly with zero pain. (holding it for an extended time is still difficult without a warmup) For someone who has done serious gymnastics training or similar it's probably nothing really special, but I've been fairly athletic all my life and played team sports up into high school and never had coaching this effective when it comes to stretching. I've definitely caught the stretching bug. At first it was really difficult, but now I look forward to the tension and release that comes from serious stretching. You can literally feel your body changing sometimes.

On the subject of the right knee pain I had going in, I'd say it's 90% gone. The crazy thing is that the exercises he has you doing are much more radical on your knees than simple squats, and yet, after the first 10 days or so, I had zero pain. I never pushed through serious pain or forced myself against my judgment. I can tell that my knee still needs time to strengthen. One day of the training I had this crazy pop, pop, pop all at once in my right knee. It wasn't painful at all and my knee has felt stronger ever since. Something appears to be changing in there. The pain in my knee has gone from a very noticeable pain during both workouts and during daily life, to totally pain free during workouts, and only very occasional dull pain during daily life. I feel pretty confident that it will be totally healed within a reasonable amount of time.

Before starting this program I was a little worried that my upper body (I've always been a harder-gainer and it's very difficult for me to make large changes in my upper body, especially) would completely lapse, and while I'd be bulletproof and flexible, my upper-body would revert back to a toothpick (its natural state due to having very long arms), but I'm very pleased to report that I've actually made serious gains in my upper body size and strength, as well. The program has a rings and band routine 2 days a week, which I also supplement with an upper body focused calisthenics routine 1 day a week. I've never trained with rings on a regular basis, so it's probably the rings themselves that have made the biggest difference, but I also credit the program for being so effective with what is actually a fairly minimal workload in terms of upper body. I'm sure that may change in Dense or Standards, as I know he introduces more weights later, including weight bench stuff.

Finally, I think because Zero is seen as this kind of lightweight stretching / rehab routine, people who are fairly fit already might think they can bomb through it and add lots of extra sets and exercises to it, but I still find that it's fairly easy to over train in the beginning. If you're a pro athlete, ok, you probably can, but this routine will absolutely leave you dead tired in the first 2 weeks. Part of that is probably because it's so different from anything I've personally done before, but also because it's deceptively intense. Anyone who has seen Ben knows the guy is intense. :squintlol:
 
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I completed 1 month of the paid program ($25 w/coupon) and then cancelled my subscription for now. Overall, I'm very happy with it. I only cancelled in the interest of being frugal because the price increases to $50 after the first month. While cancelling will end your access to the daily planning / training app (mostly a convenience thing) and access to an online coach, there's nothing stopping you from simply taking notes of all the workout plans and using them yourself, which is what I plan to do for at least the next 3-6 months. Because you get unlimited access to all the plans and training info, and you can have your form critiqued at least once by a coach, I'd say its very well worth paying for at least 1 month. During my month I also noticed that Ben made some alterations to some of the programs, so it may be worth joining again for another month down the road just to see how he has tweaked things. (surprisingly they said I could join again in the future for $25 initially)

Regarding the program itself, there's three levels - Zero, Dense and Standards, in that order. I started at the bottom with the Zero program, which is 12 weeks. Initially I thought I might try to speed ahead and just do 3-4 weeks, but I realized after a couple weeks that's probably not a good idea.

Zero is largely focused on simple bodyweight exercises and stretching, and wow does my body need the stretching. That's the biggest reason why I'm not speeding ahead. On some of the stretches I'm still nowhere close to the Standard level. that being said, I've noticed massive changes in my overall level of flexibility. For the first time since probably high school, I can bend straight down and touch my toes without bending my knees at all, and do it repeatedly with zero pain. (holding it for an extended time is still difficult without a warmup) For someone who has done serious gymnastics training or similar it's probably nothing really special, but I've been fairly athletic all my life and played team sports up into high school and never had coaching this effective when it comes to stretching. I've definitely caught the stretching bug. At first it was really difficult, but now I look forward to the tension and release that comes from serious stretching. You can literally feel your body changing sometimes.

On the subject of the right knee pain I had going in, I'd say it's 90% gone. The crazy thing is that the exercises he has you doing are much more radical on your knees than simple squats, and yet, after the first 10 days or so, I had zero pain. I never pushed through serious pain or forced myself against my judgment. I can tell that my knee still needs time to strengthen. One day of the training I had this crazy pop, pop, pop all at once in my right knee. It wasn't painful at all and my knee has felt stronger ever since. Something appears to be changing in there. The pain in my knee has gone from a very noticeable pain during both workouts and during daily life, to totally pain free during workouts, and only very occasional dull pain during daily life. I feel pretty confident that it will be totally healed within a reasonable amount of time.

Before starting this program I was a little worried that my upper body (I've always been a harder-gainer and it's very difficult for me to make large changes in my upper body, especially) would completely lapse, and while I'd be bulletproof and flexible, my upper-body would revert back to a toothpick (its natural state due to having very long arms), but I'm very pleased to report that I've actually made serious gains in my upper body size and strength, as well. The program has a rings and band routine 2 days a week, which I also supplement with an upper body focused calisthenics routine 1 day a week. I've never trained with rings on a regular basis, so it's probably the rings themselves that have made the biggest difference, but I also credit the program for being so effective with what is actually a fairly minimal workload in terms of upper body. I'm sure that may change in Dense or Standards, as I know he introduces more weights later, including weight bench stuff.

Finally, I think because Zero is seen as this kind of lightweight stretching / rehab routine, people who are fairly fit already might think they can bomb through it and add lots of extra sets and exercises to it, but I still find that it's fairly easy to over train in the beginning. If you're a pro athlete, ok, you probably can, but this routine will absolutely leave you dead tired in the first 2 weeks. Part of that is probably because it's so different from anything I've personally done before, but also because it's deceptively intense. Anyone who has seen Ben knows the guy is intense. :squintlol:
Great summary of your experiences on the program, thank you.

I am very tempted to buy the program simply because the great results I have had by piecing together his exercises from his videos. I think I might still be over doing it. I believe in one of the videos he said he only works out about 30 minutes a day, 5 days a week. Not counting stretching, though due to him being so advanced the lifts he does works the stretching as well.

I think that is the big thing with the program, the lifts are so difficult that they are very taxing on the body. A ATG Split Squat v. a normal squat, is much more intense. It requires such a high degree of focus due to the balance act and each time you are pushing yourself to get better. I am sleeping so much more and I still feel tired, which tells me I might be over doing it.

I am also tempted by his upper body routine. I do the dumbbell military press he has on his video about bulletproofing his shoulders. That works way better than the standard military press. I have always struggled in the weight room. I started lifting in 1994 because everyone and their dog told me that if I wanted to play college basketball I needed to get bigger. I have never stopped, and I have done probably every program under the sun. Tried most every supplement that is legal, including Androsteindione, which was legal way back in 2001 when I used it, bought it at GNC. And I have never had good results. I have a feeling if I bought some rings and just did the workout he describes and ditch the bench press that I would get better results. Not great results, but at least it would look like I lifted weights in my arms.

Thank you!
 

fireshark

Woodpecker
Orthodox Inquirer
I am very tempted to buy the program simply because the great results I have had by piecing together his exercises from his videos. I think I might still be over doing it. I believe in one of the videos he said he only works out about 30 minutes a day, 5 days a week. Not counting stretching, though due to him being so advanced the lifts he does works the stretching as well.

I am also tempted by his upper body routine. I do the dumbbell military press he has on his video about bulletproofing his shoulders. That works way better than the standard military press. I have always struggled in the weight room. I started lifting in 1994 because everyone and their dog told me that if I wanted to play college basketball I needed to get bigger. I have never stopped, and I have done probably every program under the sun. Tried most every supplement that is legal, including Androsteindione, which was legal way back in 2001 when I used it, bought it at GNC. And I have never had good results. I have a feeling if I bought some rings and just did the workout he describes and ditch the bench press that I would get better results. Not great results, but at least it would look like I lifted weights in my arms.

Starting out it was taking me nearly an hour for every workout, but now I'm down to about 40 minutes on average, 5 days a week, sometimes adding the 6th day for pullups and chin-ups depending on my energy and soreness level.

The only supplement I use now is creatine in my shakes 4-5 times a week. Rings are pretty incredible. I don't think there is any comparable tool that works so many upper body muscles at one time and offers the same range of motion. Nothing is ever a silver bullet all on its own, but some things do work better for different people.
 
Question for you guys doing the program and who may have lower back pain: has this program helped in that regard?
I have a lot of lower back problems. This program has seemed to help.

#1) It replaces traditional bar squats and deadlifts for ATG Split Squats and ramp board squats, which takes the pressure off the lower back.

#2) There are different kinds of hyperextensions. I do seated hyperextensions but I have to make sure to keep it to one set and not push it too hard. If I do I have back spasms the next few days after working out.
 

Don Quixote

Pelican
Orthodox Inquirer
He mainly focuses on the knee, but his exercises also strengthen and stretch the ankle and hip. Stretching along with it (static stretches) will make these joints more flexible and in doing so will improve your posture and thus your back.

So the only joints left would be shoulder/elbow/wrist. Here is one he did on shoulders...

The problem is I can't understand what he is saying, or what I should actually do. It looks like he is just doing a normal overhead press with dumbbells.
 
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