The Lack/Decline of Physical Media

Mr Freedom

Sparrow
Read this article and got me thinking:


With everything going online or on the cloud the lack of having an actual DVD, VHS, CD or whatever means that the content that is purchased online with your credit card is not really yours and/or subject to manipulation.

I've noticed more and more laptops being made without DVD drives. There clearly is a push to do away with the days when you could walk into a shop and buy a DVD (physical piece of property) that you would own forever or borrow one from a friend. In order to purchase a movie or game in this day and age it is not as simple as going into a shop and handing over cash in exchange for ownership but now Amazon, Netflix, Hulu and the likes you have to sign up to the terms and conditions of the provider. And Amazon is no longer hiding the fact that the users do not own any of the content that they purchase.

I imagine in the future they will have periodic updates for Movies so that they can remove anything un-pc or deemed to be offensive. 80s movies on netflix edited to fit an entirely PC narrative or kick you off their sites if you upset the powers that be in anyway.

I also find streaming services to be incredibly lazy. There is something unique and more satisfying about watching a movie that you physically bought in a store and that you own forever. I think people should start boycotting these globalist streaming services and go to their local town game store or video store (if there are any still around) and revive the physical media industry.
 

STG

Robin
This is the future.

Today's popular movie is tomorrow's hate speech.

There is value to old encyclopedia sets. 50 years from now you can copy an Old America encyclopedia entry directly onto an internet page and have some "Fact Checker" tell you that the information you posted is wrong.

All information in the digital world is subject to revision and modification.

Do not buy ebooks, digital movies, or games.
 

JiggyLordJr

Kingfisher
Somewhere in the middle is having a copy on an offline usb stick. Many DVDs come with a digital copy attached, as the rippers were thinking ahead at the time. Alas, most of these files end up on torrenting sites, but there’s definitely something to be said about owning a physical copy of media. If it’s a special movie then just having it and displaying it can be a nice memento. Disclaimer, grew up with only discs, VCRs, and cassettes, so I am quite partial to them; reminds me of s simpler time. Feels like things have changed in just the past 10 years; can’t remember the last time I’ve used one, or seen someone else used one. Crazy how quick the transition was.
 
Somewhere in the middle is having a copy on an offline usb stick. Many DVDs come with a digital copy attached, as the rippers were thinking ahead at the time. Alas, most of these files end up on torrenting sites, but there’s definitely something to be said about owning a physical copy of media. If it’s a special movie then just having it and displaying it can be a nice memento. Disclaimer, grew up with only discs, VCRs, and cassettes, so I am quite partial to them; reminds me of s simpler time. Feels like things have changed in just the past 10 years; can’t remember the last time I’ve used one, or seen someone else used one. Crazy how quick the transition was.


Same, when i was a kid, it was VHS, then by middle school it was SVCD then by high school DVD. It was crazy how fast we went from renting blockbuster for the weekend, then to netflix disks to throw back in the mail then to instant streaming...all in my 35 years of living
 

grenade001

Sparrow
Somewhere in the middle is having a copy on an offline usb stick. Many DVDs come with a digital copy attached, as the rippers were thinking ahead at the time. Alas, most of these files end up on torrenting sites, but there’s definitely something to be said about owning a physical copy of media. If it’s a special movie then just having it and displaying it can be a nice memento. Disclaimer, grew up with only discs, VCRs, and cassettes, so I am quite partial to them; reminds me of s simpler time. Feels like things have changed in just the past 10 years; can’t remember the last time I’ve used one, or seen someone else used one. Crazy how quick the transition was.

Are you referring to the ISO file?

I have definitely been torrenting more in the last six months, and placing more focus into having offline storage of my files. I'm late 20s and a decade ago I would never have thought about owning physical copies of movies, music, etc after downloading the files I wanted. I remember even five years ago, the thought of having a 2k title DVD collection to be superfluous. I have been called a "boomer" by people my age for still having the digital mp3 files on my phone for music, and not using Spotify.
 

infowarrior1

Hummingbird
Same, when i was a kid, it was VHS, then by middle school it was SVCD then by high school DVD. It was crazy how fast we went from renting blockbuster for the weekend, then to netflix disks to throw back in the mail then to instant streaming...all in my 35 years of living

Man I still remember MS-DOS. Then Windows 95 and still using Floppy Disks. Before growing up with DVDs.
 

grenade001

Sparrow
If you don't own a physical copy but store your stuff in a Cloud. You don't actually own it. But your media is tucked away in massive server farms out of sight in the basements of whatever Corporation despises you.
I agree with your point. I downloaded the files, and put them onto an external hard drive. I don't trust "the cloud", it has minimal utility in a world with cheap USB drives, and external hard drives. Plus the paltry "free" data limits did not entice me at all.
 

FactusIRX

Woodpecker
I don't subscribe to any movie/tv streaming services. All the essential movies that I like I own on Blu-ray. The rest I have downloaded and are on my computer.

I use a streaming service for music, but I'm trying to get away from that.
 

Bartimaeus Rex

Robin
Gold Member
Are you referring to the ISO file?

I have definitely been torrenting more in the last six months, and placing more focus into having offline storage of my files. I'm late 20s and a decade ago I would never have thought about owning physical copies of movies, music, etc after downloading the files I wanted. I remember even five years ago, the thought of having a 2k title DVD collection to be superfluous. I have been called a "boomer" by people my age for still having the digital mp3 files on my phone for music, and not using Spotify.

I still use a late 2000s era mp3 player in the gym, haven’t seen anyone else with one in years. A coworker told me a few years ago “Dude you HAVE to get Spotify, it’s soo easy”. No, I don’t think I do lol.
 

MRAll134

Kingfisher
I have a huge DVD/Blu-ray collection and book library. The good thing about owning physical media, outside of having it in your hand, is that they sometimes gain value over time - because of rarity. I sold a copy of Tarsem Singh's The Fall for $50, after buying it at a thrift store for $2. But, you kind of need to know what you are looking for.
 

MKE-Ed

Robin
Read this article and got me thinking:


With everything going online or on the cloud the lack of having an actual DVD, VHS, CD or whatever means that the content that is purchased online with your credit card is not really yours and/or subject to manipulation.

I've noticed more and more laptops being made without DVD drives. There clearly is a push to do away with the days when you could walk into a shop and buy a DVD (physical piece of property) that you would own forever or borrow one from a friend. In order to purchase a movie or game in this day and age it is not as simple as going into a shop and handing over cash in exchange for ownership but now Amazon, Netflix, Hulu and the likes you have to sign up to the terms and conditions of the provider. And Amazon is no longer hiding the fact that the users do not own any of the content that they purchase.

I imagine in the future they will have periodic updates for Movies so that they can remove anything un-pc or deemed to be offensive. 80s movies on netflix edited to fit an entirely PC narrative or kick you off their sites if you upset the powers that be in anyway.

I also find streaming services to be incredibly lazy. There is something unique and more satisfying about watching a movie that you physically bought in a store and that you own forever. I think people should start boycotting these globalist streaming services and go to their local town game store or video store (if there are any still around) and revive the physical media industry.
Sadly, the days of owning your own movies are quickly becoming a thing of the past. Back in the 1990s and early 2000s, I was really big into collecting movies on VHS and then DVDs. I lost interest collecting movies around 2011 due to time limitations and other requirements of my time. About a year ago I had to visit two Best Buy stores in two Midwest cities and while I was there I decided to check out their movie selection. I was shocked to see how few movies they had for sale. I asked the store clerks about this and I was told that very few people today actually buy movies any more and that most people get their movies streamed through Netflix and Amazon.

Call me old fashioned, but I prefer to actually own my on copy of a movie. They can still be purchased, but they only make a very limited number of movies. I usually like to look at used book stores for used copies that you can get at good prices.
 

MRAll134

Kingfisher
Call me old fashioned, but I prefer to actually own my on copy of a movie. They can still be purchased, but they only make a very limited number of movies. I usually like to look at used book stores for used copies that you can get at good prices.

For indie films, they might print 10-15k DVD copies. For the bigger releases (movies made for > 2 + million dollars), they probably print 100xs that.
 
If there is music or movies important to you, I would look into buying them on CD or DVD or at least files on a hard drive you own. Same for books. When everything is streamed, the few oligarchs controlling the streaming can air brush anything they want out of popular existence.

Thrift stores have DVDs for a dollar or two and same for CDs. And lots of cheap CDs and DVDs on eBay. For someone like me who started out paying quadruple that for a cassette tape, and ten times that for a VHS tape, it seems like a bargain.

I do not think the oligarchs are clever enough to have orchestrated this, but it sure does not hurt their feelings that it is happening. It is mainly due to laziness. I feel really, really, sad for anyone whose whole universe of entertainment and culture is whatever NetFlix puts in front of them each month.
 
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