The Louis CK thread

Thot Leader

Kingfisher
Gold Member
Roosh said:
I listened to the bootleg set and while there were some funny moments (mostly in the beginning), Louis' style of humor makes him come across as a disturbed man. Many of his jokes seem to be about genitalia, murder, or degradation.

bbgun said:
I'd like to feel sorry for him, but a big part of his act is self-flagellating white guilt. No thanks.

Yup. His schtick always seemed to be, "I joke around about degenerate stuff but I'm actually a nice guy. To prove it, here are some jokes about how white people suck and how men are trash. I'm like a teddy bear with a dirty sense of humor, you should like and trust me". Once the veil gets lifted, you can see how this type of person deliberately constructs a public image in order to cover up their true nature as thoroughly and believably as possible (also see: Bill Cosby).

In our celebrity worshipping culture we've come to see comedians as philosphers rather than clowns (I think this began with George Carlin who did have a lot of good insight into the nature of society, which paved the way for guys like Bill Hicks). Louis is still a worthwhile entertainer, but now we're forced to see him as just that, a source of entertainment and nothing more. One more step in lifting the veil/taking the redpill/whatever metaphor you prefer. Ultimately a good thing.
 

Aurini

Ostrich
Thot Leader said:
Roosh said:
I listened to the bootleg set and while there were some funny moments (mostly in the beginning), Louis' style of humor makes him come across as a disturbed man. Many of his jokes seem to be about genitalia, murder, or degradation.

bbgun said:
I'd like to feel sorry for him, but a big part of his act is self-flagellating white guilt. No thanks.

Yup. His schtick always seemed to be, "I joke around about degenerate stuff but I'm actually a nice guy. To prove it, here are some jokes about how white people suck and how men are trash. I'm like a teddy bear with a dirty sense of humor, you should like and trust me". Once the veil gets lifted, you can see how this type of person deliberately constructs a public image in order to cover up their true nature as thoroughly and believably as possible (also see: Bill Cosby).

In our celebrity worshipping culture we've come to see comedians as philosphers rather than clowns (I think this began with George Carlin who did have a lot of good insight into the nature of society, which paved the way for guys like Bill Hicks). Louis is still a worthwhile entertainer, but now we're forced to see him as just that, a source of entertainment and nothing more. One more step in lifting the veil/taking the redpill/whatever metaphor you prefer. Ultimately a good thing.

"Philosophers rather than clowns" - more than just that; cult leaders.

Even Carlin, and Bill Hicks, both of whom I greatly respect and admire, had their flaws. If you rewatch them today, they tend towards viewing certain institutions as monolithic, and utterly missed how their own Libertarian ideas could be used against them. How Libertarianism could be twisted into Libertinism.

When people read Plato (on the rare occasion that they do) they read him within context, and consider his ideas without swearing blind allegiance to them. I've been enjoying some of Quintus Curtius' translated books of philosophy, and while I find them inspiring, I'm not driven to blindly adhere to Stoic philosophy.

But comedians - possibly because of the charisma, or it could be the absolute lack of spiritual direction in most peoples' lives - get treated like messiahs, their words sacrosanct.

I don't put this upon them, but upon the audience. We need to do better.
 

questor70

Ostrich
Aurini said:
But comedians - possibly because of the charisma, or it could be the absolute lack of spiritual direction in most peoples' lives - get treated like messiahs, their words sacrosanct.

Comedians tend to use comedy as a crutch for serious psychological issues. This is why most comedians lead self-destructive lifestyles. The attraction to the audience is watching them self-immolate as they use their own life anecdotes (real or exaggerated) as material.

After all, comedy is tragedy+time. So a comedian's commodity is tragedy. A comedian who isn't leading a tragic life or is at least isn't miserable with life in general for one reason or another is going to struggle for material.

The older you get the more you see the same patterns repeat over and over again. For instance, Nikki Glaser has a new Netflix special on. I'd link to the Netflix trailer but it's X-rated talk in the first few seconds (unflagged by Youtube of course). I didn't really know who she was but I stumbled on an interview with her on the Joe Rogan show where she went off on how disappointing her carousel-riding has been. She's trying to be humorous of course, but she is portraying herself as a victim of men who are commitment-phobes. Joe Rogan doesn't explain to her that guys won't commit to sluts, but he does explain to her that guys aren't just pump-and-dumpers but that she is "a lot of work". She's looking at it from a frame of female entitlement, that she's worth commitment simply due to having two X chromosomes when in fact she has to prove her worth by not being such a crude loudmouth. This actually NEUTERED her comedy because it exposed it for what it is, a psychological coping mechanism.

Someone who uses comedy this way isn't looking to improve their lives. They are only looking for simple validation. A sort of, hey, look how we're all in the same boat. Let's all bond through collective misery. It's sort of a fatalistic attitude to life.

But that's the appeal. If you relate to a comedian doing this sort of schtick, it also validates your own common gripes with life, so you can proceed to do nothing about them.

But the reason the Nikki Glaser thing really made me think is that her act is literally identical to Amy Schumer. It's the same attempt to pretend that being an open and unashamed female slut is blazing a trail for female sexual liberation. And how is this different from the Ted Talk that Donovan Sharpe dissected? Whether it's a Ted-Talk or a stand-up act you're attempting to validate your behavior because underneath it all you really know it's not good for you. It's a way to let yourself off the hook.
 
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