The Mark Zuckerberg thread

redbeard

Hummingbird
Catholic
Gold Member
This guy is getting roasted...and 2020 is still 3 years away. He hasn't even announced candidacy.

There's no way in hell here's running!
 

TravelerKai

Peacock
Gold Member
I wish she would run. Many black men, even Democrat ones, privately hate her ass deeply for ruining black women and for her pro gay agenda. Not only that, she is just too liberal for even moderates. She has no children and is rumored to be gay or bi. She might actually do much worse than Hillary did. No way racist white women let a black woman beat them to the white house as well.

President Trump would have to be careful debating her though, because she is not Hillary, and would have lots of sassy comebacks and is capable of baiting him into screwing himself into saying something awful. This would be one of those candidates that you match up nicely with and you do not have to do extra shit, just let the demographics carry you and attack their positions.
 

Roosh

Cardinal
Orthodox
To show off his new virtual reality feature, Mark thought it would be a good idea to use a backdrop of hurricane-ravaged Puerto Rico to show how the technology feels "really magical."

Forward to 3:00: https://www.facebook.com/zuck/videos/vb.4/10104094186863501/?type=2&theater

Donning an Oculus Rift headset, Zuckerberg and Rachel Franklin, Facebook’s head of social V.R., embarked on a “magical” tour of the devastated island—where many residents are still without electrical power and much-needed food and supplies—in an attempt to explain how Facebook Spaces related to Facebook’s disaster relief efforts. “We’re in a 360 video in Puerto Rico . . . we’re on a bridge here, it’s flooded,” grinning cartoon Zuckerberg said in the Facebook Live video. “You can get a sense of some of the damage here that the hurricanes have done, and one of the things that’s really magical about virtual reality is you can get the feeling that you’re really in a place.” The background video, provided by NPR, featured flooded streets and Puerto Ricans clearing their homes of debris.

https://www.vanityfair.com/news/201...irtual-reality-tour-of-devastated-puerto-rico
 
Talk about a socially inept dweeb. I pray he runs in 2020. Trump has more game in his little pinky toenail than Zuck has in his whole body. He's so tone deaf it is laughable. Nobody wanted to point out the obviously bad optics either, because he'd know to have a temper, just like Clinton.
 

MajorStyles

Pelican
Catholic
Bacchus said:
Looks like it'll be Oprah then.



So Steadman as the first lady? And that zany gal-pal Gail as Vice President? I can see the ivory-tower libs giving each other high fives, congratulating each other on the idea.

If she ever ran, and somehow managed to win, she'd balloon up to 400 lbs. by the end of year one. And then we'd have a special sit-down interview with Kim Jung Un, where he describes how he was bullied all during high school in Pyongyang. Winfrey holding his hand, assuring him that it's ok and it wasn't his fault.
 

brick tamland

Kingfisher
Link: https://thenextweb.com/eu/2017/06/0...s-all-about-damage-control-now/#.tnw_nAo82bCV

Pirate Bay founder: We’ve lost the internet, it’s all about damage control now
by MÁR MÁSSON MAACK — in EUROPE
Pirate Bay founder: We’ve lost the internet, it’s all about damage control now
7,435
SHARES

At its inception, the internet was a beautifully idealistic and equal place. But the world sucks and we’ve continuously made it more and more centralized, taking power away from users and handing it over to big companies. And the worst thing is that we can’t fix it — we can only make it slightly less awful.

That was pretty much the core of Pirate Bay’s co-founder, Peter Sunde‘s talk at tech festival Brain Bar Budapest. TNW sat down with the pessimistic activist and controversial figure to discuss how screwed we actually are when it comes to decentralizing the internet.

Forget about the future, the problem is now

In Sunde’s opinion, people focus too much on what might happen, instead of what is happening. He often gets questions about how a digitally bleak future could look like, but the truth is that we’re living it.

Everything has gone wrong. That’s the thing, it’s not about what will happen in the future it’s about what’s going on right now. We’ve centralized all of our data to a guy called Mark Zuckerberg, who’s basically the biggest dictator in the world as he wasn’t elected by anyone.

Trump is basically in control over this data that Zuckerberg has, so I think we’re already there. Everything that could go wrong has gone wrong and I don’t think there’s a way for us to stop it.

One of the most important things to realize is that the problem isn’t a technological one. “The internet was made to be decentralized,” says Sunde, “but we keep centralizing everything on top of the internet.”

To support this, Sunde points out that in the last 10 years, almost every up-and-coming tech company or website has been bought by the big five: Amazon, Google, Apple, Microsoft and Facebook. The ones that manage to escape the reach of the giants, often end up adding to the centralization.

We don’t create things anymore, instead we just have virtual things. Uber, Alibaba and Airbnb, for example, do they have products? No. We went from this product-based model, to virtual product, to virtually no product what so ever. This is the centralization process going on.

Although we should be aware that the current effects of centralization, we shouldn’t overlook that it’s only going to get worse. There are a lot of upcoming tech-based services that are at risk of becoming centralized, which could have a huge impact on our daily lives.

We’re super happy about self driving cars, but who owns the self driving cars? Who owns the information about where they can and can’t go? I don’t want to ride in a self driving car that can’t drive me to a certain place because someone has bought or sold an illegal copy of something there.

Sunde firmly believes that this is a realistic scenario as companies will always have to put their financial gains first, before the needs of people and societies. That’s why there needs to be a greater ethical discussion about technology and ownership, if we don’t want to end up living in a corporate-driven dystopia (worse than our current one, that is).

Making a shitty situation slightly more tolerable

Feeling a bit optimistic, I asked Sunde whether we could still fight for decentralization and bring the power back to the people. His answer was simple.

No. We lost this fight a long time ago. The only way we can do any difference is by limiting the powers of these companies — by governments stepping in — but unfortunately the EU or the US don’t seem to have any interest in doing this.

So there’s still some chance for a less awful future, but it would require a huge political effort. However, in order to achieve that, the public needs to be informed about the need for decentralization — but historically that’s not likely to happen.

I would say we, as the people, kind of lost the internet back to the capitalist society, which we were hoping to take it back from. We had this small opening of a decentralized internet but we lost it by being naive. These companies try to sound good in order to take over, that they’re actually ‘giving’ you something. Like Spotify gives you music and has great passion for music, and all of the successful PR around it.

But what it does to us in the long term is more like smoking. Big data and Big Tobacco are really similar in that sense. Before, we didn’t realize how dangerous tobacco actually was, but now we know it gives you cancer. We didn’t know that big data could be thing, but now we know it is. We’ve been smoking all our lives on big data’s products and now we can’t quit.

And just like with tobacco, it’s governments that need to create the restrictions. However, it’s difficult to see how any government — except for big players like US and EU — are supposed to be able to restrict the powerful tech giants.

Sunde feels that as the EU behemoth becomes bigger, it will be more difficult to pass laws that are actually for humans and that give people extended right. Which is unfortunate as the EU technically has the legislative power to make an actual difference when it comes to decentralization.

The EU could say that if Facebook wants to operate within the EU, they have to agree that all of the data has to be owned by the user, and not by Facebook. Which would be quite simple for the EU to do, but of course that would make Facebook really upset.

Then every country would be scared to be the first one to implement the law because Facebook would leave and all of its citizens would be without their tobacco. That’s the problem we’ll always have.

Sunde, however, is slightly optimistic (but not really) as he doesn’t feel that this fight has to necessarily go through monolithic governments to reach some kind of successful result. In fact, it might actually be more likely to succeed on a smaller national level.

In regards to this, Sunde names my beloved Iceland as an example, where the Pirate Party, running on a platform of groundbreaking digital policies, almost got into government. Dramatic changes on a national level, no matter how small the population is, could have great effects in the global community. Basically meaning that countries can lead by example.

Sunde, who’s half Norwegian and half Finnish, says that another good example of leading digital policies on a national level is when Finland made access to the internet a human right in 2010. By giving people these rights, the government had to define what the internet actually is and prevented future discussions about censorship — bolstering people’s rights against further centralization.

If nation states can actually facilitate further decentralization, like Sunde suggests, then we might actually be able to hamper the immense power of big corporations. Countries like Estonia have shown that politicians can come up with digital policies that actually preserve citizens’ right in a digital age.

However, we humans are illogical creatures that don’t necessarily do the things that are good for us: “It’s better for the people, but we don’t want to suffer that one single down-time second of our beloved tobacco.”​
 

Araveug

Robin
Roosh said:
To show off his new virtual reality feature, Mark thought it would be a good idea to use a backdrop of hurricane-ravaged Puerto Rico to show how the technology feels "really magical."

Forward to 3:00: https://www.facebook.com/zuck/videos/vb.4/10104094186863501/?type=2&theater

Donning an Oculus Rift headset, Zuckerberg and Rachel Franklin, Facebook’s head of social V.R., embarked on a “magical” tour of the devastated island—where many residents are still without electrical power and much-needed food and supplies—in an attempt to explain how Facebook Spaces related to Facebook’s disaster relief efforts. “We’re in a 360 video in Puerto Rico . . . we’re on a bridge here, it’s flooded,” grinning cartoon Zuckerberg said in the Facebook Live video. “You can get a sense of some of the damage here that the hurricanes have done, and one of the things that’s really magical about virtual reality is you can get the feeling that you’re really in a place.” The background video, provided by NPR, featured flooded streets and Puerto Ricans clearing their homes of debris.

https://www.vanityfair.com/news/201...irtual-reality-tour-of-devastated-puerto-rico

this is so important for people to see. this guy is so bizarre.

'we're on a bridge here, :icon_biggrin::icon_biggrin: it's flooded:icon_biggrin::icon_biggrin:'
 

Genghis Khan

 
Banned
I was browsing through some other RVF thread (in the lifestyle section) and someone mentioned Bezos was short.

I looked him up, he's 5ft7.

Google suggested Zuckerberg's height.

Zuckerberg is 5ft7 too!!!

Wtf? Dude always came across as some lanky 6ft tall awkward white nerd (like James Damore). Turns out he's actually pretty short.

Jesus, if he does end up running for president, he'll look so tiny compared to Trump. Can you imagine Zuckerberg and Trump on stage together during debates. Assuming the media doesn't pull some camera angle bullshit, that'll destroy any chances Zuckerberg has of winning, assuming he had any.

Fuck, Barron Trump will make him look like a midget.

Americans are probably the last people on Earth to elect a man below 6ft.
 

monster

Pelican
Genghis Khan said:
I was browsing through some other RVF thread (in the lifestyle section) and someone mentioned Bezos was short.

I looked him up, he's 5ft7.

Google suggested Zuckerberg's height.

Zuckerberg is 5ft7 too!!!

Wtf? Dude always came across as some lanky 6ft tall awkward white nerd (like James Damore). Turns out he's actually pretty short.

Jesus, if he does end up running for president, he'll look so tiny compared to Trump. Can you imagine Zuckerberg and Trump on stage together during debates. Assuming the media doesn't pull some camera angle bullshit, that'll destroy any chances Zuckerberg has of winning, assuming he had any.

Fuck, Barron Trump will make him look like a midget.

Americans are probably the last people on Earth to elect a man below 6ft.

Putin's only 5' 6"
 

delicioustacos

Woodpecker
Gold Member
They made him stand on a box. They made the other people stand in a hole. He had to look tall in pictures. Before he said anything he had to practice it with lawyers. I don’t want to be president — I just want people to fucking like me for once. Sheryl. Sheryl’s idea, Sheryl’s hustling and planning and the phone ringing with her Facebook® Messenger® video calls nine times a day with some big new idea meant to peel him off his job so she could take it. Rehabilitate your image.

Lean in to this, you bitch: they hate me. They fucking hate me. CNBC was a disaster. Even with the reporter the team liked. Even though the team made calls to Comcast about the NBC family of networks’ place in the algorithm. The team gave him his answers and he’d worked until it was natural and then Sheryl had called in the car to the studio. She changed one word. I really think this is an important nuance, Mark. Somehow her new adverb dismantled the logic of the paragraphs in his head. He half forgot it all. On TV with a chasm of not words underneath screaming for a split second and he knew he looked like an alien pulling levers to drive a weird wax robot dwarf. Suckup reporter leering back, eyes like a waterhead Weimaraner. She looked not entirely relieved to no longer have to fuck Matt Lauer. He blew it. The PR team was here now. In the conference room. View of the open workspace he sat in for pictures and the news was a disaster. This was with them sugarcoating it. Jesus Christ, I built something that lets you talk to everyone you love. Anywhere, anytime, for free and they fucking hate me. People give you the data, and you use it for something they might like. They hate me for it.

She sent him to every state in the country. Sheryl. Big bristly truck drivers with stubble that rasped you when you hugged them for the camera. Women’s fat baby arms straining at old bra straps the color of cigarette smoke on a ceiling. The people were prepped by the team. Told to not talk to the press by the team. Signed papers. When he walked in smiling saying folks he could see they were shocked by his smallness. Looking into the top of his scalp for bald spots to tell their friends about. A year shaking church potluck hands swollen up like they’d been stuck in a beehive. Junkies and ex convicts and churches. He loved it. Hadn’t expected to. He could never get away from the team. Except once. One twilight on the Wisconsin dairy farm. She was maybe eighteen, seeing to the calves, and he cleared his throat and she said how big are you. When he told her she said: I do gymnastics and the little guys are stronger. Her hair was like corn silk. Her skin made his arm hairs stand up. They had fifteen minutes together. The others talked like he was money. She talked like he was a person. She was a Future Farmer of America.

The stock was tanking. The phone was ringing. The New York Times said it was his fault Trump was president. I need some air, he said. He walked out breathing loud and waving them all away, to the kiosk out front where a stunned attendant gave him his mountain bike.

The Harley salesman was shocked he was real. I’m five foot seven, he said. Do you have one good for guys my size. They did, they made one just for him. He had one credit card. Some special kind you could buy a battleship with. Can you throw a couple grand cash in there for me. The bank called when the salesman rang it up. It was the first time the card had been used.

He cried a little kissing the babies goodbye. Trying to explain to the nanny who spoke only Cantonese that this was important. That he could interrupt language immersion. The nursemaid looked on, uncomprehending. A face like a mealworm. Priscilla hired the background cast of The Dark Crystal for the house. I love you, he told them. I love you more than anything. I promise I’ll come back for you.

Mark climbed through the Mojave where the rain brought tiny white flowers like stars. When he crossed the state line he stopped to take off his helmet. Nothing ever felt as good as that wind. Wisconsin was 1800 miles.

(source)
 
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