The Motorcycle Thread

Bluey

Woodpecker
Buck Wild said:
Picked up my bike on Saturday. Don't have my insurance yet so I just rode it around my neighborhood for a bit---felt amazing. Honestly can't remember the last time I was this excited about a hobby.


Obligatory photos:

Those are a nice bike. Would've loved one to the 1000cc ones before they stopped making them.
 
So good to see thread like this. I ride bikes for ~8 years already. 3 hard crashes which killed one bike completelly, and 2 small incidents with very little damage. But getting into motos was a life changing turn and no regrets. Beeing into this and having a bike literally saved my life. My present bike with some minimal mods- k1200r. Have it for 6 years now. Next year will be looking for something more compatable for long distances.
Who else with beemers there? :angel:
 

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Bluey said:
Buck Wild said:
Picked up my bike on Saturday. Don't have my insurance yet so I just rode it around my neighborhood for a bit---felt amazing. Honestly can't remember the last time I was this excited about a hobby.


Obligatory photos:

Those are a nice bike. Would've loved one to the 1000cc ones before they stopped making them.

The s1000 was a beast of a bike back in the day.

On a different note, my folks are visiting at the moment, finally got the balls together to show Dad my bikes. I had always assumed he would go mental about bikes but I guess this was a hang up from when I was younger. He seemed interested in general and even took a few pics. That made me happy.

For my AT I’ve put a couple of number boards in it which are replicas of the 92 Paris Dakar ones and i put certain number on them as a tribute to the cars he used to race with the same number back in the day.

Today I took the big ktm over the high pass on the way back home, it handles so amazing off road, almost as well as on road, even with the road/off road mix tyres. I love that big orange crazy bike.

Ps. Welcome to the club @buck wild
 

Buck Wild

Kingfisher
Finally got my insurance and registration figured out on Friday. Went for a 40-minute ride this morning around town and resolved to practice the basics every chance I got at every red light, turn, etc. Smooth braking, upshifting/downshifting, subtle clutch-throttle manipulation. Finally starting to get the hang of the basics. Ducked out onto some bigger routes heading back and took the bike up to 50 mph---it was exhilarating. Really starting to get why people love this hobby so fucking much. I've steadfastly refused to get a car over the years so this is really it for me.

Need to work on my countersteering and making tighter turns. Any suggestions on this (or other good newbie skills to learn) would be greatly appreciated.

And thanks for all the encouragement guys---it's a big part of why I love this place :)
 

roberto

Pelican
Gold Member
Social Engineer said:
So good to see thread like this. I ride bikes for ~8 years already. 3 hard crashes which killed one bike completelly, and 2 small incidents with very little damage. But getting into motos was a life changing turn and no regrets. Beeing into this and having a bike literally saved my life. My present bike with some minimal mods- k1200r. Have it for 6 years now. Next year will be looking for something more compatable for long distances.
Who else with beemers there? :angel:

I have a baby Beemer- F650. Love it, it does everything I need.
 
Buck Wild said:
Need to work on my countersteering and making tighter turns. Any suggestions on this (or other good newbie skills to learn) would be greatly appreciated.

50mph? Haha, brings back memories. I remember riding my first bike home after buying it, I managed to get it up to 50mph on the highway and I was terrified (thrilled, but terrified). Now I hit that in first gear when I'm really cranking it (30 years later, mind you). Don't think about the speed, just think about being smooth.

As for turns and steering, I can not stress enough the importance of looking ahead as far as possible in order to accurately judge how you should be making your turn. Knowing in advance lets you set your speed before entering the turn. Your goal should be maintaining a steady speed through the turn, since altering your speed will change the steering geometry.

It is a technique that can be practiced and honed forever; even now I find that when I'm focusing on seeing as far ahead as possible, my entry and exit speeds are higher, and my turns smoother.
 

Bluey

Woodpecker
Ski pro said:
Bluey said:
Buck Wild said:
Picked up my bike on Saturday. Don't have my insurance yet so I just rode it around my neighborhood for a bit---felt amazing. Honestly can't remember the last time I was this excited about a hobby.


Obligatory photos:

Those are a nice bike. Would've loved one to the 1000cc ones before they stopped making them.

The s1000 was a beast of a bike back in the day.

On a different note, my folks are visiting at the moment, finally got the balls together to show Dad my bikes. I had always assumed he would go mental about bikes but I guess this was a hang up from when I was younger. He seemed interested in general and even took a few pics. That made me happy.

For my AT I’ve put a couple of number boards in it which are replicas of the 92 Paris Dakar ones and i put certain number on them as a tribute to the cars he used to race with the same number back in the day.

Today I took the big ktm over the high pass on the way back home, it handles so amazing off road, almost as well as on road, even with the road/off road mix tyres. I love that big orange crazy bike.

Ps. Welcome to the club @buck wild

Oh yeah, from what I heard though the SV1000 was a lot tamer to ride than the TL1000 before it. But you'd kind of expect that with the TL1000 being based on a racing bike!
 

roberto

Pelican
Gold Member
ed pluribus unum said:
Buck Wild said:
Need to work on my countersteering and making tighter turns. Any suggestions on this (or other good newbie skills to learn) would be greatly appreciated.

50mph? Haha, brings back memories. I remember riding my first bike home after buying it, I managed to get it up to 50mph on the highway and I was terrified (thrilled, but terrified). Now I hit that in first gear when I'm really cranking it (30 years later, mind you). Don't think about the speed, just think about being smooth.

As for turns and steering, I can not stress enough the importance of looking ahead as far as possible in order to accurately judge how you should be making your turn. Knowing in advance lets you set your speed before entering the turn. Your goal should be maintaining a steady speed through the turn, since altering your speed will change the steering geometry.

It is a technique that can be practiced and honed forever; even now I find that when I'm focusing on seeing as far ahead as possible, my entry and exit speeds are higher, and my turns smoother.

Toi add to this- practice taking corners without letting up. Look 'through' them as mentioned. If you try to scrub speed in a panic things can go south quickly.

The way it was described to me is that the bike is like a gyroscope. To keep it upright you need to rev it. This also has implications when pulling out at juntions- rev it more and slip the clutch more to stop yourself heading for the verge the other side.

Practise taking a corner at close to what you feel is your limit, and then opening up, not letting off or braking. Counter intuative, but you'll see it's what you should do. Then it's a case of practice, practice, practise.
 
Buck Wild said:
Finally got my insurance and registration figured out on Friday. Went for a 40-minute ride this morning around town and resolved to practice the basics every chance I got at every red light, turn, etc. Smooth braking, upshifting/downshifting, subtle clutch-throttle manipulation. Finally starting to get the hang of the basics. Ducked out onto some bigger routes heading back and took the bike up to 50 mph---it was exhilarating. Really starting to get why people love this hobby so fucking much. I've steadfastly refused to get a car over the years so this is really it for me.

Need to work on my countersteering and making tighter turns. Any suggestions on this (or other good newbie skills to learn) would be greatly appreciated.

And thanks for all the encouragement guys---it's a big part of why I love this place :)

Look up trail braking for tighter corners and what the guys said below about not lifting off or braking too much too much. The engine braking on most bikes is massive.

Ps. Look where you WANT to go
 
Today was a beautiful day here in the alps. Nice temperatures and just enough sun to keep the chill off. No tourists around, empty roads.

Took bike 2, the crazy Dakar one and ride the hour to an appointment and back over mountain cols and twisty roads. Carbed bikes love fresh weather like this.

Because of no distractions, you get time to think, work things through in your mind, smell the air and all the shit the farmers are spreading on the fields.

The feeling of being one with the bike, 4 limbs combining to hustle your bike along, when you get it right, there’s nothing like it. I was whooping for joy at some parts and overwhelmed by the bike Dakar bikes schitzo power kick after 7000rpm.

I love autumn.
 
What do you all do to keep your bikes happy in the winter (except you lucky people who ride year round). Mine are tucked up in the garage but hating it.
 

ChefAllDay

Kingfisher
I run some stabilized fuel through it, and hook up the battery to a smart charger. I don't know if I should run it a few minutes every couple weeks or not.
 
^ don't run it. You won't get it hot enough and you will end up with condensation buildup which will accumulate in your oil sump and pipes. Water will contaminate your oil and in the pipes will lead to them rusting prematurely.

I know, it's tempting, but just leave it be.
 

Malone

Pelican
Gold Member
Ski pro said:
What about if you run it until it’s up to working temperature. Surely that’s got to be good for it?

Not really. As long as you've got fuel stabilizer and a battery tender that's pretty much all you need to do. It'll start right up in the spring and be happy.
 
Malone said:
Ski pro said:
What about if you run it until it’s up to working temperature. Surely that’s got to be good for it?

Not really. As long as you've got fuel stabilizer and a battery tender that's pretty much all you need to do. It'll start right up in the spring and be happy.

What is fuel stabiliser?
 
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