The Motorcycle Thread

Ski pro said:
Malone said:
Ski pro said:
What about if you run it until it’s up to working temperature. Surely that’s got to be good for it?

Not really. As long as you've got fuel stabilizer and a battery tender that's pretty much all you need to do. It'll start right up in the spring and be happy.

What is fuel stabiliser?

When fuel sits long enough, certain additives that are in it precipitate out and leave a varnish-like residue which is enough to gum up the smaller ports in a fuel system, especially in a fuel-injected bike. Stabilizer is an additive that will prevent this from happening and make your spring start-up less aggravating. Worst-case scenario you have to take off your carbs and take them for an ultrasonic bath to open things up again.

Typically you add the prescribed amount of stabilizer to a full tank of gas (or add it then fill the tank to guarantee proper mixing) then let it run for a good 5-10 mins to ensure the treated fuel is all through the system.

I kinda miss my old Suzuki GS1150; the carbs were basically a bucket with a hole in it, they never clogged, all i did each spring was crank and crank and crank until it roared to life and blasted a cloud of oily smoke from the pipes... good times.
 

roberto

Pelican
Gold Member
ed pluribus unum said:
Ski pro said:
Malone said:
Ski pro said:
What about if you run it until it’s up to working temperature. Surely that’s got to be good for it?

Not really. As long as you've got fuel stabilizer and a battery tender that's pretty much all you need to do. It'll start right up in the spring and be happy.

What is fuel stabiliser?

When fuel sits long enough, certain additives that are in it precipitate out and leave a varnish-like residue which is enough to gum up the smaller ports in a fuel system, especially in a fuel-injected bike. Stabilizer is an additive that will prevent this from happening and make your spring start-up less aggravating. Worst-case scenario you have to take off your carbs and take them for an ultrasonic bath to open things up again.

Typically you add the prescribed amount of stabilizer to a full tank of gas (or add it then fill the tank to guarantee proper mixing) then let it run for a good 5-10 mins to ensure the treated fuel is all through the system.

I kinda miss my old Suzuki GS1150; the carbs were basically a bucket with a hole in it, they never clogged, all i did each spring was crank and crank and crank until it roared to life and blasted a cloud of oily smoke from the pipes... good times.

Worst case scenario you will need a new carb if you don't use stabiliser. I've seen carbs totally blocked with that green resin type stuff, although this was after a few years. My ultrasound bath wouldn't touch it.
 
Both of mine are carbed bikes and my thinking was that running them up to warm and then tuning them for a while roughly once a week until the snow has gone will be sufficient to avoid this clogging.
 

Investment Bro

Woodpecker
Gold Member
Wanted to bump this great thread up and see if I can get help from some of y'all.

I'm debating between getting a convertible and a bike, seeing as though I live in Florida and can use either year round. Obviously you guys know which way I'm leaning, given that I'm posting here.

I'd be interested in using it as a daily driver, but my only reservation is the drivers here in Tampa are notoriously bad. One of my cousins also has a dent in his head from a bad motorcycle accident. Obviously part of being a man is taking a risk, but I'm curious how you guys approach the safety issue.

That said, I've given myself a 15k budget to start out, going to get the permit and then endorsement and all that good stuff, how would you guys recommend starting out?
 
I'm probably getting a motorcycle license this summer. What makes me hesitate is everywhere I've read they say a bad wreck is inevitable if you ride long enough. The only question is how bad you're going to get fucked up, and if you have the gumption to keep riding. Even the msf course teachers say "after you wreck the first time, you'll figure out if this is really for you". It's like goddamn, is getting paralyzed really worth it. You're giving strangers the ability to kill you on the road.
 

idane

Sparrow
I've ridden some 15000 mi and never wrecked. Even on big machines. When I see some guys riding I understand why society has so many accidents. My take:

1. Ride defensively
2. Release the throttle when you reach an intersection and try to get eye contact with the crossing cars/trucks
3. Never speed unless you are on a race track
4. Never ride at dusk, dawn and night in an area with lots of wildlife.
5. Dont drive fast in curves ... you never know if there is gravel on the road.

This makes motorcycling pretty much boring. Only thing is the massive acceleration which is fun at intersections.
 

RPB5000

Chicken
Most important factor for riding a motorcycle I believe is where you live. I for instance live in Toronto, I rode for 2 years. In that time 2 riding friends were killed and 2 others were seriously injured to the point that they are permanently disabled. All experienced riders. Let alone the countless near death experiences I have had. Not too mention the bullshit weather.

It definetly gets the girls going, and its endlessly fun and exciting for the most part, but its something you have to love enough to give your life for. I liked it, but I packed it in and dont really miss it. I got an SVT Cobra Mustang, chicks dig it more for sure.
 

RatInTheWoods

Hummingbird
Gold Member
Definitely ride very defensively, a bike is exciting enough without being an idiot and taking extra risks.

I see some terrible riding, and riders getting killed is still pretty rare, so I figure if you ride safely your odds are very low.

Still, is someone pulls out, theres not much you can do, is there?
 

Veloce

Crow
Gold Member
Investment Bro said:
Wanted to bump this great thread up and see if I can get help from some of y'all.

I'm debating between getting a convertible and a bike, seeing as though I live in Florida and can use either year round. Obviously you guys know which way I'm leaning, given that I'm posting here.

I'd be interested in using it as a daily driver, but my only reservation is the drivers here in Tampa are notoriously bad. One of my cousins also has a dent in his head from a bad motorcycle accident. Obviously part of being a man is taking a risk, but I'm curious how you guys approach the safety issue.

That said, I've given myself a 15k budget to start out, going to get the permit and then endorsement and all that good stuff, how would you guys recommend starting out?

15k is way more than you need and a lot to put into something you may decide is not for you. For a starter bike you don't need to spend anything over 5-6k and you can find plenty of bikes for 2-3k, all depends on what you want and your style of riding. You need to decide what style of bike suits you and then buy something with an appropriate amount of power depending on your weight.

All motorcyclists rationalize this thing in one way or another. There's just no way around the safety issue. My rationalization is that it's NOT a daily driver nor will it ever be. I take my bike out on weekends and try to get it out in the desert where there's not many other people.

Of course, the past two days I've tried that, the weather has not cooperated. No point in trying to enjoy myself out there with 50mph gusts. And today when I started to ride out I promptly got a speeding ticket, my 2nd in the last 6 months. I've been much better about speeding on the freeway and in town but this guy caught me as I was passing some traffic at 93mph.

As with the first ticket, my first thought was "At least he didn't catch me going 130" :angel:

eta: I think the whole "it's a matter of when, not if" is bullshit. Plenty of riders out there that have never bailed.
 
Investment Bro said:
Wanted to bump this great thread up and see if I can get help from some of y'all.

I'm debating between getting a convertible and a bike, seeing as though I live in Florida and can use either year round. Obviously you guys know which way I'm leaning, given that I'm posting here.

I'd be interested in using it as a daily driver, but my only reservation is the drivers here in Tampa are notoriously bad. One of my cousins also has a dent in his head from a bad motorcycle accident. Obviously part of being a man is taking a risk, but I'm curious how you guys approach the safety issue.

That said, I've given myself a 15k budget to start out, going to get the permit and then endorsement and all that good stuff, how would you guys recommend starting out?

I think there is a difference between a daily driver and weekend or day off fun.

I don’t know what the traffic is like with you and obviously the cars and trucks in the US are much bigger than here.

I think your general safety comes down to thinking for all the other people. I try to never put myself in a position where I’m compromised and my life comes down to the decisions of someone I don’t know. What someone said above about eye contact is very important.

I feel quite safe on a bike, I can see more and the acceleration gets you out of trouble often.

I can’t give you any advice on what to do but I personally love that sense of freedom. I wouldn’t get that even in a convertible car.
 

RVF400

Sparrow
I would be very careful about getting into riding a bike on the street casually in 2019 in the USA where everyone is on their phone.

It is a big investment in time and money. I would take MSF if you have not yet, and spend money on quality gear. Start on a small bike and ideally you would get some track time. There is no where else you can learn how to control a motorcycle effectively ( and truly know what it is capable of ) then on the track.

As it is I am focusing more on trackdays now and less on the street, especially commuter riding in California as no one here gives a fuck about the rules of the road or anyone around them. Especially viscous on LA freeways.

All that said, it is probably the best time ever to be a motorcyclist.. Truly the golden age of bikes right now where you can buy bikes off the showroom floor that would have been WSBK spec less than 10 years ago. Also there is an abundance of incredible bikes for sale under $5k that can do it all (commute, sport touring, trackday etc) as a lot of riders age out and hang it up.
 

911

Peacock
Gold Member
Investment bro: get a starter bike like this one:

https://www.cycletrader.com/listing/1982-Honda-XL-250-5003672900

[img=520x388]https://cdn1.cycletrader.com/v1/med...e1.jpg?width=1024&height=768&quality=70[/img]

$1,500 to $3,000.

Trail/mixed use Japanese big four 250-350cc in good shape with low mileage. Very reliable and easy to maintain, super light, and great to learn riding on, fun to ride. You sit in a high upright position which is great for seeing traffic and being seen. You can also get easily on the sidewalk or navigate bumpy roads.

Keep it for 6 months then move on to something bigger for cruising the highways and longer distances, and resell it for the same price, or keep it as a second bike, they're awesome as a short to mid commuter bike or for riding on dirt trails without the truck-and-trailer motocross fuss.
 
First ride out of 2019 today. 4 of the crew headed down from the mountains into the valley and down by the lake for lunch. Felt so good to be back on the bike again. I always forget how you smell everything.

Unusual to get on the bike in feb here but this long spell of high pressure has dried the roads nicely.

Still a few slippy patches and I nearly binned it at one point. Also managed to pick myself up a speeding fine Policeman told me he liked my bike though.

I’m currently reading zen and the art of motorcycle maintenance. He talks about on a bike you’re in the scene. In a car you’re looking at the scene through glass in a box. He’s so right.
 

Cortés

Woodpecker
Gold Member
Whats up guys. Back in november I bought a motorcycle in colombia and ive been riding thru south america since.

UgjTLl4.jpg


I never rode a motorcycle before in my life, but I always thought it would be fucking sick to explore a new continent by bike, riding around going from city to city, girl to girl. Fortunately I made some good money off of stocks before I arrived in colombia, so once I got down here I decided I was gonna go thru with this.

The process was a pain in the ass to buy it and wait for the license plate, but if anyone is interested I can write a bit of the process on how to it works.

qA9QTNd.jpg


Its an AKT TTX 200. Some shit Indian brand. Unfortunately this thing is falling apart like crazy. Already had to get a new chain, new spark plug, new clutch line and some other shit as well. I took a good inspection of the bike this morning and its missing basically half of the screws throughout. Praying it doesnt just straight up fall apart while i ride!

200cc really isnt shit, it tops out at about 80mph in low altitude flat roads, which is more than plenty here in south america. Here there are random speed bumps out of nowhere, occasionally with no sign or pre caution, so going faster than maybe 90mph is a deathwish.

200cc is definetly not enough for the mountainous regions of the Andes! Any time im trying to climb a mountain and im over 5000ft of altitude my bike tops out at a solid 5mph. Huge pain in the ass, especially when youre nowhere near civilization and its raining and cold (happened more than once!)

It was new when I got it and cost $1800 in total. I wish I just bought an older but more pricey kawasaki or yamaha around 400-500cc.

City driving here is absolutely abhorrant. Especially in Peru, traffic rules are just a suggestion. People will drive over the median going down the highway nearly hitting you, running you off the road. In Armenia colombia some retard smashed me from behind and my bike flipped and fell on me. My ankle was fucked up for about a month and Ive got some permanent scars from it. Im lucky I was wearing a helmet, if i didnt i would be veggie, fell head first. The bike was fine, only had to replace the mirrors.

BGW00Au.jpg


BUT HAVING SAID ALL THAT...

Buying this motorcycle was hands down the best decision I made on this trip! It gives you so much more freedom to explore the country, get off the beaten path

1kmnezj.jpg


I never would have hiked along this river if i didnt ride down a random dirt path outside of manizales!

Also being a gringo with a motorcycle is a latina magnet! Bringing girls on an adventure on the bike makes for great memories.

The feeling of riding and just whipping around is exhilerating and addicting, I find myself trying to rationalize buying a motorcycle as a daily driver in Massachusetts (or I could gtfo of massachusetts, much more appealing!)

In a week or two Im gonna be selling my bike in chile, as the cost of shipping makes no sense for me, almost as much as what i bought this bike for.

VHTo196.jpg


ru3yBF1.jpg
 
Cortés said:
Whats up guys. Back in november I bought a motorcycle in colombia and ive been riding thru south america since.

UgjTLl4.jpg


I never rode a motorcycle before in my life, but I always thought it would be fucking sick to explore a new continent by bike, riding around going from city to city, girl to girl. Fortunately I made some good money off of stocks before I arrived in colombia, so once I got down here I decided I was gonna go thru with this.

The process was a pain in the ass to buy it and wait for the license plate, but if anyone is interested I can write a bit of the process on how to it works.

qA9QTNd.jpg


Its an AKT TTX 200. Some shit Indian brand. Unfortunately this thing is falling apart like crazy. Already had to get a new chain, new spark plug, new clutch line and some other shit as well. I took a good inspection of the bike this morning and its missing basically half of the screws throughout. Praying it doesnt just straight up fall apart while i ride!

200cc really isnt shit, it tops out at about 80mph in low altitude flat roads, which is more than plenty here in south america. Here there are random speed bumps out of nowhere, occasionally with no sign or pre caution, so going faster than maybe 90mph is a deathwish.

200cc is definetly not enough for the mountainous regions of the Andes! Any time im trying to climb a mountain and im over 5000ft of altitude my bike tops out at a solid 5mph. Huge pain in the ass, especially when youre nowhere near civilization and its raining and cold (happened more than once!)

It was new when I got it and cost $1800 in total. I wish I just bought an older but more pricey kawasaki or yamaha around 400-500cc.

City driving here is absolutely abhorrant. Especially in Peru, traffic rules are just a suggestion. People will drive over the median going down the highway nearly hitting you, running you off the road. In Armenia colombia some retard smashed me from behind and my bike flipped and fell on me. My ankle was fucked up for about a month and Ive got some permanent scars from it. Im lucky I was wearing a helmet, if i didnt i would be veggie, fell head first. The bike was fine, only had to replace the mirrors.

BGW00Au.jpg


BUT HAVING SAID ALL THAT...

Buying this motorcycle was hands down the best decision I made on this trip! It gives you so much more freedom to explore the country, get off the beaten path

1kmnezj.jpg


I never would have hiked along this river if i didnt ride down a random dirt path outside of manizales!

Also being a gringo with a motorcycle is a latina magnet! Bringing girls on an adventure on the bike makes for great memories.

The feeling of riding and just whipping around is exhilerating and addicting, I find myself trying to rationalize buying a motorcycle as a daily driver in Massachusetts (or I could gtfo of massachusetts, much more appealing!)

In a week or two Im gonna be selling my bike in chile, as the cost of shipping makes no sense for me, almost as much as what i bought this bike for.

VHTo196.jpg


ru3yBF1.jpg

Been reading about your tales in the Columbia thread. Welcome to the club man.
 

911

Peacock
Gold Member
Great post Cortes, glad you've been living it up in the South Am. backroads. And yeah, you would have been better off with a Japanese big 4 used dual/trail bike, nearly maintenance free, just clean/lube the chain and change your motor oil, with some light yearly work, and no problem going up any mountain even with a 250cc.

Was your loss of power due to the steepness, or did altitude/air density factor in even on flat terrain at high altitude? Maybe that would be fixed with a carburetor tuneup.
 

Cortés

Woodpecker
Gold Member
911 said:
Great post Cortes, glad you've been living it up in the South Am. backroads. And yeah, you would have been better off with a Japanese big 4 used dual/trail bike, nearly maintenance free, just clean/lube the chain and change your motor oil, with some light yearly work, and no problem going up any mountain even with a 250cc.

Was your loss of power due to the steepness, or did altitude/air density factor in even on flat terrain at high altitude? Maybe that would be fixed with a carburetor tuneup.

If i had to guess Its a mix of both. When im in higher altitude cities riding on flat road i dont top out at the same speed as sea level. Popayan which is at about 6000ft I topped 75km/h on open road. Going up a hill at that altitude i never went above 4th gear because the bike would decelerate pretty quickly going uphill. Going uphill at sea level the bike decelerates, but at a lesser extent.

As ive broken the bike in a bit more recently, as well as replaced the chain, the top speed on flat road is slightly higher. Maybe i wont have as many issues at high altitude as i did at first. Gonna put it to the test tommorow

tommorow im gonna be climbing the atacama desert to cross into argentina. Reaches over 17000ft above sea level. pray for me
 
Extremely pleasant afternoon spent at a local motorbike expo with poker and my best friend.

Some lovely machinery there from bmw, ktm, Indian, Kawasaki, Honda, susuki, Triumph etc.

My personal favs at the show were the triumph bobber black and the thruxton r. Special mentions for the bmw r9t and a $42k ducati panigale.
 

ChefAllDay

Kingfisher
RVF400 said:
I would be very careful about getting into riding a bike on the street casually in 2019 in the USA where everyone is on their phone.

This scares the hell out of me. Driving my SUV all winter I notice so many idiots on their phones. Still won't stop me from hauling the bike out in a couple weeks though.

Awesome post Cortes! Your trip sounds unreal, I would definitely do something like that if I could.
 

roberto

Pelican
Gold Member
Fuck, it's the middle of summer 2019 and I haven't been out on my bike since spring. It's run out of MOT and I've got the front fairing all off to fettle some electrics, but work went crazy and I've not had time.
 
Top