The Movie Thread

Rush87

Hummingbird
WalterBlack said:
Rush87 said:
^Trailer looks decent. Didn't spot any re-writing history diversity. Cautiously optimistic. I'll watch.

I just saw it and I thought it was great. You might spot the odd black or Indian soldier in there, like 1 in 1000 men, but it's not noticeable. There were definitely some blacks and Indians in France in WW1.

Watched it. Brilliant film and now one of my favorite all time war movies. Deserves the Oscar.
 

Enigma

Hummingbird
Orthodox
Gold Member
Roy Batty said:
I think he is greatly underrated by the manosphere/red pill community.

From 1997 to 2007, he directed four movies:

- Jackie Brown: Middle-aged female flight attendant outwits the ATF, LAPD, and a drug kingpin for $500,000, then rides off into the sunset to live it up in Spain

- Kill Bill 1 & 2: Female assassin goes on a two movie killing spree to get revenge against her evil fiancé who tries to kill her and their unborn for no reason

- Death Proof: A bunch of ditzy college girls outdrive hard ass Kurt Russell, then pull him out of his car and beat the shit out of him

Even as a blue-pilled teenager his feminism was too much for me to handle.

To add, Kill Bill is hailed as this great "homage" to samurai movies of the past, yet it takes a genre that is defined by rugged, stoic men facing moral dilemmas while trying not to get killed and turns it into a bunch of whores in cat suits shrieking at each other.

Compare that to another Western samurai movie that happened to come out the same year, The Last Samurai, which beautifully portrays both traditional masculinity AND femininity.

This scene:


Versus this scene:

 

ilostabet

Pelican
Orthodox Inquirer
After the experience with that piece of garbage I described above, I think I'm going to stick with rewatching Mel Gibson's and Studio Ghibli's films whenever I want to watch something and be done with it.
 
renotime said:
nomadbrah said:
Roy Batty said:
nomadbrah said:
When did Tarantino sell out to the jews and the globohomo?

He didn't.
Name one globohomo character from his movies.

His sadistic jew masturbation killing NAZEEHS in Inglorious Basterds.

His disgusting anti-white violence fantasy in Django Unchained.

But I guess his Mandingo fight scene and the heavy use of the word nigger didn't bother you at all, right? :laugh:

If you think the word nigger was aimed at blacks to be derogatory, you're very naive. He is brandishing it against innocents whites as a jewish curse.
 

Oberrheiner

Pelican
ilostabet said:
After the experience with that piece of garbage I described above, I think I'm going to stick with rewatching Mel Gibson's and Studio Ghibli's films whenever I want to watch something and be done with it.

I think I have all of them, like twenty .. four ? of them IIRC.

What's your opinion on mononoke ?
 

renotime

Ostrich
Gold Member
nomadbrah said:
renotime said:
nomadbrah said:
Roy Batty said:
nomadbrah said:
When did Tarantino sell out to the jews and the globohomo?

He didn't.
Name one globohomo character from his movies.

His sadistic jew masturbation killing NAZEEHS in Inglorious Basterds.

His disgusting anti-white violence fantasy in Django Unchained.

But I guess his Mandingo fight scene and the heavy use of the word nigger didn't bother you at all, right? :laugh:

If you think the word nigger was aimed at blacks to be derogatory, you're very naive. He is brandishing it against innocents whites as a jewish curse.

So why would you think the violence upon whites is derogatory, but not the mandingo fights? Seems pretty incongruent to me, bro.

For the record I don't find Tarantino's movies offensive in the least, and I think it's funny when guys like Spike Lee get all pissed over Tarantino using the word nigger in a movie about slaves.

But, I must admit I find it odd that Tarantino never used any anti-semitic slurs against the Jews in Basterds. Maybe he's aware that a certain crowd runs Hollywood.

As far as QT being globohomo, I think you're reaching for straws.
 

Athanasius

Pelican
Harold Lloyd was a comedy genius and a great athlete. Safety Last is probably his most iconic stunt, but what starts here about 20 minutes in is crazy. I don't know how the guy survived this stuff.

 

Salinger

Kingfisher
Athanasius said:
Harold Lloyd was a comedy genius and a great athlete. Safety Last is probably his most iconic stunt, but what starts here about 20 minutes in is crazy. I don't know how the guy survived this stuff.


Wow...those shots look totally real. But they can't be, can they...?
 

renotime

Ostrich
Gold Member
Watched what might be Scorsese's most underrated and unknown movie last night, it's called After Hours. It was made in the 80s and of course it was shot in New York. Clocking in at an hour and 40 minutes it might be the shortest movie Scorsese has ever made.

Basically this dude meets a girl in a diner and meets up with her later downtown. On the way there he loses all his money, so he has no way to get home. Over the course of the night he meets all these odd characters and gets into all kinds of trouble on his attempt to make it back uptown.

Don't watch the trailer, it gives the whole movie away.
 

debeguiled

Peacock
Gold Member
renotime said:
Watched what might be Scorsese's most underrated and unknown movie last night, it's called After Hours. It was made in the 80s and of course it was shot in New York. Clocking in at an hour and 40 minutes it might be the shortest movie Scorsese has ever made.

Basically this dude meets a girl in a diner and meets up with her later downtown. On the way there he loses all his money, so he has no way to get home. Over the course of the night he meets all these odd characters and gets into all kinds of trouble on his attempt to make it back uptown.

Don't watch the trailer, it gives the whole movie away.

Discipline.

Surrender Dorothy.

Don't you reason with me.
 

renotime

Ostrich
Gold Member
debeguiled said:
renotime said:
Watched what might be Scorsese's most underrated and unknown movie last night, it's called After Hours. It was made in the 80s and of course it was shot in New York. Clocking in at an hour and 40 minutes it might be the shortest movie Scorsese has ever made.

Basically this dude meets a girl in a diner and meets up with her later downtown. On the way there he loses all his money, so he has no way to get home. Over the course of the night he meets all these odd characters and gets into all kinds of trouble on his attempt to make it back uptown.

Don't watch the trailer, it gives the whole movie away.

Discipline.

Surrender Dorothy.

Don't you reason with me.

How about some context?
 
renotime said:
Watched what might be Scorsese's most underrated and unknown movie last night, it's called After Hours. It was made in the 80s and of course it was shot in New York. Clocking in at an hour and 40 minutes it might be the shortest movie Scorsese has ever made.

Basically this dude meets a girl in a diner and meets up with her later downtown. On the way there he loses all his money, so he has no way to get home. Over the course of the night he meets all these odd characters and gets into all kinds of trouble on his attempt to make it back uptown.

Don't watch the trailer, it gives the whole movie away.

This is always a great movie to watch again when you have an itch that only a solid dose of 80's can scratch. Another appearance by Linda Fiorentino in her prime, too.
 

debeguiled

Peacock
Gold Member
renotime said:
debeguiled said:
renotime said:
Watched what might be Scorsese's most underrated and unknown movie last night, it's called After Hours. It was made in the 80s and of course it was shot in New York. Clocking in at an hour and 40 minutes it might be the shortest movie Scorsese has ever made.

Basically this dude meets a girl in a diner and meets up with her later downtown. On the way there he loses all his money, so he has no way to get home. Over the course of the night he meets all these odd characters and gets into all kinds of trouble on his attempt to make it back uptown.

Don't watch the trailer, it gives the whole movie away.

Discipline.

Surrender Dorothy.

Don't you reason with me.

How about some context?

You just watched it, isn't that the context?


 

renotime

Ostrich
Gold Member
Oh right, I forgot. To be honest some of the dialogue didn't really grab me, it was more about the physicality of the movie and all the misunderstandings.

And of course nostalgia for a time when men and women could have normal conversations, ie the diner scene where he's reading Henry Miller.
 

Hypno

Crow
For those with AMC: they are having breaking bad marathons each Sunday, leading up to their broadcast of El Camino, and then Season 5 of Better Call Saul. Season 4 of Better Call Saul drops on Netflix in the U.S. Feb. 9.

they are also having a Dirty Harry marathon. Not sure when, I just autorecorded it.
 

Kurgan

Kingfisher
I forgot to mention I saw 1917 a few weeks ago. You don't see many films about World War I. I thought it was well-paced and kept me wanting to see more. I can't believe woke jerk-offs were hating on this because of a lack of diversity when you clearly saw Indian and Black troops in the fight. Probably because there was no women in it. Pffttt.

Does anyone know of how any other movies set in World War I?
 
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