The Movie Thread

Tail Gunner

Hummingbird
Gold Member
Look what I got by ingnoring Uncle Cr33pin! When I wrote that review last night, I was not even factoring all of the vapid liberal pabulum into the equation. Even without all that junk, the film was a stunning disaster.
 

Tail Gunner

Hummingbird
Gold Member
I watched "The Valley of Violence" last night. It is a nice little film with a great screenplay, direction, musical score, and performances (especially by Ethan Hawke and John Travolta). I love Westerns, so I might have a bias, but I really enjoyed it.

The opening credits are audacious and brash, with enormous blood-red lettering and surreal graphics, combined with an original music score (just like the Westerns of yore). This is the initial clue that the film isn't meant to be taken too seriously, but it the film does take itself just seriously enough that it's not a snarky parody. Almost all of the characters are a bit sketchy and dangerous.

"What does a priest need so many bullets for?"

"Sinners."

 
Just saw ‘Knives Out’ Really entertaining, lots of character, clever murder mystery. Not sure how much lasting impact it leaves though, but it’s a fun watch. 8.5/10
Saw ‘Ma’ last week too. I’m mixed about this one. Octavia Spencer is great in it. It’s just a shame her performance is stuck in a mediocre B-list thriller with a basic revenge plot at its core. It’s not bad, but it’s very plot-driven. The kids don’t act rationally and keep making stupid choices for the sake of the plot moving forward (like going back to the crazy woman’s house for a party even though she pulled a gun on them last time). It was watchable, but can’t really recommend it unless you’re a huge Octavia Spencer fan. 6.5/10
 

Tactician

Kingfisher
Parasite is superb. The shots are extremely deliberate and the cast fits really well. The tone starts out pretty lighthearted, but slowly becomes very tense and exciting and then .. something special.

The idea is that the son in a poor and unemployed family of 4 lucks himself into a position as a tutor to a wealthy family. The poor family then schemes to get the other 3 family members hired as well, but they need to cross some lines to do so.

The plot sounds simple, but plot summaries never do a movie justice. This is one of the best movies of 2019.

A big theme in the movie is class divide and upward mobility. The job market is brutal in Korea and just a few years ago the minimum wage was like $5. Competition bleeds into a lot of areas of people's lives. People look down on each other based on physical attractiveness, intelligence, and of course money/status; credit card debt is a big problem there because of the effort put into keeping up appearances. The movie touches on these themes in a layered way without being preachy. If anything, it's pretty neutral and you can decide for yourself which layers stand out to you.

Above all, Parasite is entertaining as hell and I really can't recommend it enough. One of the few movies I'll very happily watch twice+.

Even though it's a Korean movie that came out earlier last year, you can currently catch it in theatres. Here's a trailer which barely shows anything:

 

Tail Gunner

Hummingbird
Gold Member
Tactician said:
A big theme in the movie is class divide and upward mobility. The job market is brutal in Korea and just a few years ago the minimum wage was like $5. Competition bleeds into a lot of areas of people's lives. People look down on each other based on physical attractiveness, intelligence, and of course money/status; credit card debt is a big problem there because of the effort put into keeping up appearances. The movie touches on these themes in a layered way without being preachy.
Another heavily-layered Korean film about class distinctions is "Burning," which was discussed previously in this thread. I heavily recommend it.

https://www.rooshvforum.com/thread-18972-post-1978142.html?highlight=korean#pid1978142

The Korean cinema is great.
 

questor70

Ostrich
stream26 said:
Just saw ‘Knives Out’ Really entertaining, lots of character, clever murder mystery. Not sure how much lasting impact it leaves though, but it’s a fun watch. 8.5/10
Rian Johnson is enemy #1 for anyone who cares about SJW infestation of Hollywood. Don't give his work your money.
 

infinitejest

Sparrow
Tail Gunner said:
Tactician said:
A big theme in the movie is class divide and upward mobility. The job market is brutal in Korea and just a few years ago the minimum wage was like $5. Competition bleeds into a lot of areas of people's lives. People look down on each other based on physical attractiveness, intelligence, and of course money/status; credit card debt is a big problem there because of the effort put into keeping up appearances. The movie touches on these themes in a layered way without being preachy.
Another heavily-layered Korean film about class distinctions is "Burning," which was discussed previously in this thread. I heavily recommend it.

https://www.rooshvforum.com/thread-18972-post-1978142.html?highlight=korean#pid1978142

The Korean cinema is great.
I saw "Burning" about a month ago and it was one of those films that I just couldn't get out of my head. While "Parasite" is a great film, arguably more entertaining and deserving of all its recent accolades, I feel that "Burning" is the more powerful and thematically rich of the two.

After watching various analyses of the film and interviews with the cast and director, I decided to watch the film again very closely and I believe I now have a better understanding of it. On my initial viewing, I took the common belief that Ben was a serial killer who killed Hae-mi, yet couldn't help but feel that it was too simple an explanation that was against the spirit of the film, where everything is open to interpretation and nothing is as it outwardly seems.

I'd like to offer an alternate view of what happened in the film, and start out by highlighting a few key lines and symbols that illustrate the main point of the film. While "Burning" is a film full of ideas and themes, from class differences to meaning in life (the Great Hunger), I think if you distill it to its core its ultimately a movie about the inability to ever truly know anything in the world. Perceived reality, which every human experiences, vs. objective reality which is even more impossible to discern in our postmodern world.

Quotes:

"To me, the world is an enigma." - Jong-su

"I wanted to disappear like that sunset." - Hae-mi

"The morality of nature...is like simultaneous existence. I'm here and I'm there. I'm in Paju and I'm in Banpo. I'm in Seoul and I'm in Africa. Something like that." - Ben

"For me, yes, he very well could be a bad guy, but also you saw a vision of him (Ben) through the lens of Jong-su...that's part of the mystery of the world is that we live our own realities and come up with the things we want to believe and sometimes they're true and sometimes they're not...in some ways Ben is the most present person throughout the film. He's there in each moment, watching, being there, and maybe the sad part is that he's the only one there, because everyone else is off in their own mind, creating their own reality." -Steven Yeun (who plays Ben)

"The film is about the mysteries of everyday life." - Lee Chang-dong (the director)

One analysis I watched talked about an interview with the director where he said this poster contained every symbol in the movie you need to know to understand it.

[img=700x600]https://i.pinimg.com/originals/6a/11/a0/6a11a09f4d0f9abe24eaed91e88aec90.jpg[/img]

-We can see the tower which Jong-su looks at from Hae-mi's room, the one that casts a fleeting light, perhaps representing a better life that he can only see from afar for a brief moment.

-The sunset that Hae-mi wishes to disappear into and the one she dances to alongside the Korean flag in the background, a symbol of peace and unity that now the country is lacking. For Hae-mi maybe this sunset is her Great Hunger satisfied.

-Ben's Porsche, an obvious symbol of privilege, power, and wealth that Jong-su can only dream of attaining.

-Hae-mi's cat, which after further reading I think is an allusion to Schrödinger's cat. Now, I am the furthest possible thing from an expert on quantum physics, so my absolute layman's understanding is that this thought experiment represents a paradox where something simultaneously is one of two possibilities and only definitely is one or the other when observed. The cat, sealed in a box, is both dead and alive, and only when observed is dead or alive.

I take the frequent discussion of memories as further expanding upon this theme. Throughout the film, Jong-su struggles to discern what really happened in his past with Hae-mi. He doesn't remember calling her ugly or saving her from the well, but she does. His mom recalls a well, but others from his town cannot. When our only basis for reality is memory, what is truly real? Similarly, is something only real when we observe it and make our own judgment in our mind? Jong-su, after much observation, believes Ben to have killed Hae-mi, but what is the truth?

-The cow is the most difficult symbol for me to understand. Near the end of the film, Jong-su sells the cow and appears to be deeply sad. The cow moos and the buyer says that it's trying to say something as we get a close-up of its face. It's important to note that the cow is a female. Maybe the cow is a symbol for Hae-mi and Jong-su coming to terms with saying goodbye to her now that he believes he knows what happened to her. I'm curious to hear what others feel the cow is a symbol of.

As for what actually happened, I don't think that Ben was a killer or a human trafficker who sold Hae-mi. When he was talking about burning greenhouses, he just as easily could have used it as a metaphor for leading a girl on and then dumping her, erasing her from his life as if she never existed.

Like Ben said, Hae-mi was lonely, poor, and in debt, and from her behavior we can see she was somewhat impulsive as well. It is very possible that she could have ran off or committed suicide. One thing I noted on my second viewing was how the camera changed focus from Jong-su to the tree branches in the background during his final phone-call with Hae-mi. These branches were very similar to the ones the camera panned to after her dance in the sunset. Maybe this is indicating that Hae-mi found her own peace through death?

Also, it's important to note that nearly the entire film is told from Jong-su's point of view. This heavily influences how we the viewer see the other characters. Take something as simple as Ben yawning. Twice, we see Ben yawning while Hae-mi dances and later on as his newest girl talks. Ben could simply just be yawning because he is tired, but from Jong-su's point of view his yawns take on a sinister tone. It reminded me of how in my bluepill days I would obsess and go over the meaning of every single interaction I had with a girl I liked. Why did she laugh at my joke like that or look at me that way? In my mind these actions carried great meaning but in reality they likely meant nothing. Aside from a brief shot of Ben in the gym (where Jong-su is below just out of view), every scene until the end of the film has Jong-su in it. Notably, we see Jong-su finally working on his novel again from Hae-mi's room as the camera pans out to a view of the city before cutting to Ben.

My view is that the rest of the movie is Jong-su's imagination and he is incorporating his own experiences with Ben and Hae-mi into his story. He believes he knows what happened based on what he has observed, and in his mind Ben is a serial killer. He imagines Ben getting ready for his date and then applying make-up to his latest victim. Then, he imagines himself as the protagonist of the story killing Ben and doling out his own justice.

Remember, Jong-su is an incredibly passive character. He doesn't make any decisions of his own volition throughout the entire film, so why would he make such a drastic choice now? Also, one of the scenes just preceding the ending is his father receiving an 18 month prison sentence for battery. He knows the justice system would never let him, a low-class citizen, get away with the murder of upper-class Ben.

At the very least, Jong-su does reach some peace. He believes he knows what happened and now has some inspiration for his writing. Before, he could not write because the world was "an enigma," but perhaps through his experiences he has gained some greater understanding.

Or not.

This was truly a beautiful and haunting film though. I won't be able to get it out of my mind for quite some time. There aren't enough superlatives to describe how great I think this film is. It's easily one of the best films I've seen in a long, long time, and I highly recommend it to anyone who hasn't seen it yet (and hopefully didn't read everything before this and spoil it for themselves).

Any of the RVF film buffs have any recommendations for films similar to this in style and tone? Loosely, it reminded me of elements of "Vertigo" and "Under the Silver Lake" with its aimless protagonist who obsesses over a woman and in the surreal, dreamlike imagery of David Lynch's films, but really it's quite unique and I haven't seen another film like this. I also have got to watch Lee Chang-dong's other films which are highly acclaimed.
 

Tail Gunner

Hummingbird
Gold Member
infinitejest said:
Any of the RVF film buffs have any recommendations for films similar to this in style and tone? Loosely, it reminded me of elements of "Vertigo" and "Under the Silver Lake" with its aimless protagonist who obsesses over a woman and in the surreal, dreamlike imagery of David Lynch's films, but really it's quite unique and I haven't seen another film like this. I also have got to watch Lee Chang-dong's other films which are highly acclaimed.
It is hard to think of another film such as "Burning," but two films that spring to mind similar to "Under the Silver Lake" are "Mulholland Drive" and "Memento" -- as two well-done films that really make you think.
 

Rotten

Robin
I just watched "Midsommer," at the advice of the above poster on the last page, it's on Amazon Prime right now.

This was a very predictable movie. It goes beat for beat exactly how you think it's going to go, Was I supposed to be laughing at the final scenes of the movie when the horrible stuff finally happens?

I guess Misommmer could be "red pill," in one respect -- you can show anybody this movie and tell them "this is why Sweden will be Moslem in a few decades." But, the director is Jewish and clearly has contempt for Swedish style tolerance, aka passive aggressiveness, and I think that he probably gets enough wrong that Swedish people should rightly be offended at their portrayal in this movie.

Watch his 'Hereditary' instead for a better slow burn horror movie with a batshit crazy ending.
 

Stonk

Robin
Roy, why don't you enlighten us about the genius of Quentin Tarantino. I'm a big fan of his work and would like to get your perspective on OUATIH
 

C-Note

Ostrich
Gold Member
I just watched A Beautiful Day in the Neighborhood with Tom Hanks about Fred Rogers. I watched his show "Mister Roger's Neighborhood" on PBS when I was kid, but I thought it was kind of weird and smarmy. I preferred Sesame Street and the Electric Company.

However, according to the movie and from what I've read elsewhere, Fred Rogers was the real deal. He was a Presbyterian minister and regarded his show as his ministry to children and families.

I wasn't aware of his 1969 testimony before a Senate committee in which he asked for funding for PBS. It's an interesting video, seeing him completely disarm and persuade the initially skeptical Senator John Pastore (D-RI), using a very effective logical, ethical, and emotional argument.
 

Laner

Hummingbird
Gold Member
C-Note said:
I just watched A Beautiful Day in the Neighborhood with Tom Hanks about Fred Rogers. I watched his show "Mister Roger's Neighborhood" on PBS when I was kid, but I thought it was kind of weird and smarmy. I preferred Sesame Street and the Electric Company.

However, according to the movie and from what I've read elsewhere, Fred Rogers was the real deal. He was a Presbyterian minister and regarded his show as his ministry to children and families.

I wasn't aware of his 1969 testimony before a Senate committee in which he asked for funding for PBS. It's an interesting video, seeing him completely disarm and persuade the initially skeptical Senator John Pastore (D-RI), using a very effective logical, ethical, and emotional argument.
I haven't seen the movie, but I have watched a lot of the TV show. My son really liked it for a period and we would watch it together. It is a really special show from the standpoint of a parent. Nothing at all comes close these days, and his fostering of imagination, love of the 'trades' and his constant talk of their importance is something that kids DO NOT HAVE A CHANCE TO SEE anymore.

His love of children, family and community is obvious.
 

Cr33pin

Peacock
Gold Member
Just watched this...... compared to most new Hollywood movies I found it to be strange and different enough to be enjoyable. If you do decide to watch it, its best to not read anything about it or watch any trailers and just in blind
 

Stonk

Robin
Saw a Few Good Men and Reservoir Dogs. Great movies. I particularly think Reservoir Dogs was Tarantino's Magnus opus despite the praise Pulp Fiction got.
 

Renzy

Kingfisher
Brian Dennehy, Tony-winning stage, screen actor, dies at 81

https://wtop.com/entertainment/2020/04/brian-dennehy-tony-winning-stage-screen-actor-dies-at-81/

[img=516x373]https://m.media-amazon.com/images/[email protected]_V1_SY1000_CR0,0,1386,1000_AL_.jpg[/img]

Among his 40-odd films, he played a sheriff who jailed Rambo in “First Blood,” a serial killer in “To Catch a Killer,” and a corrupt sheriff gunned down by Kevin Kline in “Silverado.” He also had some benign roles: the bartender who consoles Dudley Moore in “10” and the levelheaded leader of aliens in “Cocoon” and its sequel.

“The world has lost a great artist,” Sylvester Stallone wrote in tribute on Twitter, saying Dennehy helped him build the character of Rambo.
 
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