The Movie Thread

Tail Gunner

Hummingbird
Gold Member
Renzy said:
Brian Dennehy, Tony-winning stage, screen actor, dies at 81
His portrayal of John Wayne Gacy, a serial killer who killed at least 33 people, was absolutely chilling. It really creeped me out.
 

Hypno

Crow
Tail Gunner said:
Renzy said:
Brian Dennehy, Tony-winning stage, screen actor, dies at 81
His portrayal of John Wayne Gacy iwas absolutely chilling. It really creeped me out.
I was going to mention that. I find him creepy to this day because his performance was so good. For those who don't know, Gacy was a respectable businessman and part time clown who raped and killed more than 30 boys and young men and burried them in his crawl space. The film was a 2-part made for TV thing called To Catch a Killer (1992).


More recently he was the grandfather Dom on The Blacklist.
 

Papaya

Crow
Gold Member
Stonk said:
Saw a Few Good Men and Reservoir Dogs. Great movies. I particularly think Reservoir Dogs was Tarantino's Magnus opus despite the praise Pulp Fiction got.
Pulp Fiction was actually great because of the editing. The camera work and dialogue were fantastic but it was the non linear / symmetrical timeline story telling that were truly groundbreaking.
 

renotime

Ostrich
Gold Member
PapayaTapper said:
Stonk said:
Saw a Few Good Men and Reservoir Dogs. Great movies. I particularly think Reservoir Dogs was Tarantino's Magnus opus despite the praise Pulp Fiction got.
Pulp Fiction was actually great because of the editing. The camera work and dialogue were fantastic but it was the non linear / symmetrical timeline story telling that were truly groundbreaking.
Not only the editing, but the dialogue was so crisp in Pulp Fiction. Characters would just have conversations about whatever. Prior to that dialogue was just a means to advance the plot of the film.

I dipped my toe into French New Wave the other night. I watched Jean Luc Godard's first film, Breathless. They say it's up there with Citizen Kane. It was one of the first films to use jump cuts.

Ebert said "It is dutifully repeated that Godard's technique of "jump cuts" is the great breakthrough, but startling as they were, they were actually an afterthought, and what is most revolutionary about the movie is its headlong pacing, its cool detachment, its dismissal of authority, and the way its narcissistic young heroes are obsessed with themselves and oblivious to the larger society."

Without this film you don't have Badlands or Bonnie and Clyde. Godard broke all the rules from the beginning.

 

renotime

Ostrich
Gold Member
Watched Chinatown last night. If you haven't seen it you need to watch it. It's right up there with the great movies of the 70s like The Godfather and Taxi Driver.

It's one of those rare LA movies where LA is a character. Before the bright lights and wide frame of Mann's Heat or the late night cruising of Drive.

Nicholson's performance might be the best of his career. He never goes over the top, but his work is still charismatic and yet tired at the same time. You get the impression the guy just wants to sleep.

This might be the best noir movie of all time.
 

Tail Gunner

Hummingbird
Gold Member
renotime said:
Watched Chinatown last night. If you haven't seen it you need to watch it. It's right up there with the great movies of the 70s like The Godfather and Taxi Driver.

It's one of those rare LA movies where LA is a character. Before the bright lights and wide frame of Mann's Heat or the late night cruising of Drive.

Nicholson's performance might be the best of his career. He never goes over the top, but his work is still charismatic and yet tired at the same time. You get the impression the guy just wants to sleep.

This might be the best noir movie of all time.
I agree. The script for "Chinatown" is often used as an example of how to write a perfect screenplay. It is widely acknowledged as one of the greatest screenplays ever written -- if not the very best. It is also great to see the great director John Huston in the role of the film's master villain.

Ever since there have been books on screenwriting (the modern age can probably be said to date from Syd Field's Screenplay, first published in 1979), Robert Towne's screenplay for Chinatown has been cited as one of the greatest screenplays ever written.

In the video below from Jack's Movie Reviews, Jack looks at the structural elements of the Chinatown script to find out why it stands out from so many others and is even today held up as an example of perfection via its screenwriting form.
https://nofilmschool.com/2018/08/watch-chinatown-screenplay-robert-towne

 

Salinger

Woodpecker
Tail Gunner said:
renotime said:
Watched Chinatown last night. If you haven't seen it you need to watch it. It's right up there with the great movies of the 70s like The Godfather and Taxi Driver.

It's one of those rare LA movies where LA is a character. Before the bright lights and wide frame of Mann's Heat or the late night cruising of Drive.

Nicholson's performance might be the best of his career. He never goes over the top, but his work is still charismatic and yet tired at the same time. You get the impression the guy just wants to sleep.

This might be the best noir movie of all time.
I agree. The script for "Chinatown" is often used as an example of how to write a perfect screenplay. It is widely acknowledged as one of the greatest screenplays ever written -- if not the very best. It is also great to see the great director John Huston in the role of the film's master villain.

Ever since there have been books on screenwriting (the modern age can probably be said to date from Syd Field's Screenplay, first published in 1979), Robert Towne's screenplay for Chinatown has been cited as one of the greatest screenplays ever written.

In the video below from Jack's Movie Reviews, Jack looks at the structural elements of the Chinatown script to find out why it stands out from so many others and is even today held up as an example of perfection via its screenwriting form.
https://nofilmschool.com/2018/08/watch-chinatown-screenplay-robert-towne

Great film? Yes
Best screenplay ever? No way.

I don't think any script is better than the one for Casablanca. While both have a great story, the dialogue in Casablanca is much better. It has so many classic lines, it can't be beat.
 

Tail Gunner

Hummingbird
Gold Member
Salinger said:
Great film? Yes
Best screenplay ever? No way.

I don't think any script is better than the one for Casablanca. While both have a great story, the dialogue in Casablanca is much better. It has so many classic lines, it can't be beat.
I also love "Casablanca," but having classic lines is only one of many elements of writing the perfect screenplay. It is like saying that Humphrey Bogart is the best actor ever, because he had so many great lines. Like acting, writing a great screenplay involves far more than having great lines.
 
I remember thinking both were overrated. But then, I saw them both at least five years ago, so I might need to rewatch them.

Neither stands as the greatest noir films, not by a long shot. I've seen enough film noirs to say this with the greatest, yet humble authority.

Like I said, I need to rewatch both again.
 

Tail Gunner

Hummingbird
Gold Member
ScannerLIV said:
I remember thinking both were overrated. But then, I saw them both at least five years ago, so I might need to rewatch them.

Neither stands as the greatest noir films, not by a long shot. I've seen enough film noirs to say this with the greatest, yet humble authority.

Like I said, I need to rewatch both again.
Well, "Casablanca" is not even in the film noir genre, although it has some of its elements, so of course it cannot be the greatest film noir movie. "Double Indemnity" is typically cited as the best film noir movie, although I prefer "The Maltese Falcon" or "The Big Sleep."

Having said that, "Casablanca" is always listed in the top ten greatest American films of all time, so it obviously ranks above all the film noir movies. "Chinatown" is usually listed in the top twenty.
 
"Out of The Past" blows both of them out of the water.

I didn't realize Chinatown was directed by the rapist.

Scratch that film out for re-watching.
 

Salinger

Woodpecker
Tail Gunner said:
Salinger said:
Great film? Yes
Best screenplay ever? No way.

I don't think any script is better than the one for Casablanca. While both have a great story, the dialogue in Casablanca is much better. It has so many classic lines, it can't be beat.
I also love "Casablanca," but having classic lines is only one of many elements of writing the perfect screenplay. It is like saying that Humphrey Bogart is the best actor ever, because he had so many great lines. Like acting, writing a great screenplay involves far more than having great lines.
I was in the industry myself, so I too know what makes a great script. There is also story, characters, pacing, etc. Both have great stories. Casablanca, IMO has more interesting, well-written characters. But it's really the brilliant dialogue that tips the scales in its favor.

Just my opinion.
 

Tail Gunner

Hummingbird
Gold Member
ScannerLIV said:
"Out of The Past" blows both of them out of the water.

I didn't realize Chinatown was directed by the rapist.

Scratch that film out for re-watching.
I watched "Out of The Past" again less than a month ago. It is a great film noir movie and I am a big Robert Mitchum fan, but it is not in the league of either "Casablanca" or "Chinatown." Actually, I would like to compile a list of the 10-20 best film noir movies and watch them all again.
 

renotime

Ostrich
Gold Member
ScannerLIV said:
I remember thinking both were overrated. But then, I saw them both at least five years ago, so I might need to rewatch them.

Neither stands as the greatest noir films, not by a long shot. I've seen enough film noirs to say this with the greatest, yet humble authority.

Like I said, I need to rewatch both again.
So are you gonna tell us what the best noir movie is? I think if we're gonna talk best noir movies Double Indemnity has to be in the conversation, but the acting was lacking, except for Edward G. Robinson, of course.

Chinatown happened before Polanski went bad, if it's any consolation. I'm willing to separate the art from the artist, but I suppose if Chinatown opened in theaters today, I'd probably have to skip it.
 

Prufrock

Robin
renotime said:
ScannerLIV said:
I remember thinking both were overrated. But then, I saw them both at least five years ago, so I might need to rewatch them.

Neither stands as the greatest noir films, not by a long shot. I've seen enough film noirs to say this with the greatest, yet humble authority.

Like I said, I need to rewatch both again.
So are you gonna tell us what the best noir movie is? I think if we're gonna talk best noir movies Double Indemnity has to be in the conversation, but the acting was lacking, except for Edward G. Robinson, of course.

Chinatown happened before Polanski went bad, if it's any consolation. I'm willing to separate the art from the artist, but I suppose if Chinatown opened in theaters today, I'd probably have to skip it.
I'm not going to say what the best noir movie is, because taste in cinema is subjective to a certain degree. But Double Indemnity, The Maltese Falcon, and The Big Sleep are generally considered to be the holy trio of noir movies.

I work near John's Grill in SF, which was one of the settings for the Maltese Falcon. John's Grill also displays one of the Maltese Falcons from the movie. It's always a pleasure to dine there.

Some noir movies that might be not as well known, but belong in the canon are: In a Lonely Place, Gun Crazy, Key Largo, Detour, The Killing (1956), and Asphalt Jungle. There are some more, of course. Please watch them and report back.

PS- Chinatown (1974) is a Neo-noir. There are many great Neo-noirs out there. Such as Altman's The Long GoodBye, Cutter's Way, and Body Heat. But that is a different category for now...

 

Hypno

Crow
Body Heat is a great film for many reasons - well shot, good plot, some great sex scenes. Interesting minor roles by Ted Danson and Mickey Rourke. Very red pill ending.
 
Top