The Movie Thread

Papaya

Crow
Gold Member
One of my favorites is the noir genre is the Coen Bros BLOOD SIMPLE (1984)




Long before they were the mega directors this was their first film. The low-budget film set the standard for the wave of American indie films to come, and it established the Coens as two of the most important voices in cinema. It also launched the careers of Frances McDormand and cinematographer Barry Sonnenfeld (who would later turn to directing himself).

One of their most underrated films IMO
 

Tail Gunner

Hummingbird
Gold Member
PapayaTapper said:
One of my favorites is the noir genre is the Coen Bros BLOOD SIMPLE (1984)

Long before they were the mega directors this was their first film. The low-budget film set the standard for the wave of American indie films to come, and it established the Coens as two of the most important voices in cinema. It also launched the careers of Frances McDormand and cinematographer Barry Sonnenfeld (who would later turn to directing himself).

One of their most underrated films IMO
Your post reminded me that I have a copy in my collection, so I just watched it again. A fantastic neo-noir crime film. Every time that I watch the film, I see something new in it. It is definitely the Cohen brother's film that I have watched most often.

The ending, where Abbey is so completely clueless, always cracks me up. While she is the catalyst for everything that happens in the story, the three men (representing love, hate, and greed) are the active participants, while she is like a small boat that bobs about aimlessly on the vast ocean of the story. That burial scene always makes me squirm. As does the knife scene. At least the film ends with a black humor belly laugh. Many tiny touches.
 

renotime

Ostrich
Gold Member
Prufrock said:
renotime said:
ScannerLIV said:
I remember thinking both were overrated. But then, I saw them both at least five years ago, so I might need to rewatch them.

Neither stands as the greatest noir films, not by a long shot. I've seen enough film noirs to say this with the greatest, yet humble authority.

Like I said, I need to rewatch both again.
So are you gonna tell us what the best noir movie is? I think if we're gonna talk best noir movies Double Indemnity has to be in the conversation, but the acting was lacking, except for Edward G. Robinson, of course.

Chinatown happened before Polanski went bad, if it's any consolation. I'm willing to separate the art from the artist, but I suppose if Chinatown opened in theaters today, I'd probably have to skip it.
I'm not going to say what the best noir movie is, because taste in cinema is subjective to a certain degree. But Double Indemnity, The Maltese Falcon, and The Big Sleep are generally considered to be the holy trio of noir movies.

I work near John's Grill in SF, which was one of the settings for the Maltese Falcon. John's Grill also displays one of the Maltese Falcons from the movie. It's always a pleasure to dine there.

Some noir movies that might be not as well known, but belong in the canon are: In a Lonely Place, Gun Crazy, Key Largo, Detour, The Killing (1956), and Asphalt Jungle. There are some more, of course. Please watch them and report back.

PS- Chinatown (1974) is a Neo-noir. There are many great Neo-noirs out there. Such as Altman's The Long GoodBye, Cutter's Way, and Body Heat. But that is a different category for now...

I understand that Chinatown is neo-noir, but it's such a great movie that it belongs up there with Double Indemnity. I think it might even be better than Double Indemnity.

Admittedly, I haven't seen many noir movies, but I've read a fair amount of Chandler and Nicholson reminds quite a bit of Sam Spade. You just know that he doesn't like what he does and he's smarter than most people.
 

Tail Gunner

Hummingbird
Gold Member
renotime said:
Hypno said:
Another underappreciated gem from that era from the Coen Bros is Raising Arizona, albeit a comedy.
Miller's Crossing is also a great lesser known film of theirs.
That film is worth watching just for this scene alone:



The first dialogue of the very next scene: "The old man's still an artist with a Thompson." lol.
 

renotime

Ostrich
Gold Member
I've been on a noir kick lately. Finally sat down to watch Body Heat and Night Moves.

Spoiler alert.

So the thing that confuses me about Body Heat. Matty stole someone identity and became Matty right? And at the end it shows that she was really Mary Ann. So if she's Mary Ann who was her friend that was visiting her that introduced herself as Mary Ann? Was that the real Matty?

I also found Night Moves pretty entertaining, but the plot was pretty murky, but the great thing about noir is you don't really need much of a plot. I recommend it if you liked Chinatown and Body Heat. And it's got Gene Hackman who was always excellent in the 70s.
 

Hypno

Crow
I've been on a noir kick lately. Finally sat down to watch Body Heat and Night Moves.

Spoiler alert.

So the thing that confuses me about Body Heat. Matty stole someone identity and became Matty right? And at the end it shows that she was really Mary Ann. So if she's Mary Ann who was her friend that was visiting her that introduced herself as Mary Ann? Was that the real Matty?
Yes, presumably. If you look closely during the "Hey lady, do you wanna fuck?" scene, when Racine first meets Mary Ann, you'll see Matty hand her a thick envelope filled with cash.
 
I'm watching watchmen. I just realized how powerful, Dr.Manhattan is. I haven't finished the movie, though, work work.
See if you can watch the Ultimate Cut, there's one without the animated Tale of the Black Freighter cut-in, but the one with it weaves the story in it pretty seamlessly, though makes for a run-time of 4+ hours. I think that was one of the only good superhero movies ever made, other than the questionable philosophy behind Dr. Manhattan, it showed how shitty and corrupt humans really are, and poked fun at a lot of PC-related material.
 

renotime

Ostrich
Gold Member
Silence of the Lambs. What a great movie.

Anthony Hopkins' best performance in my book. The man is so detached from what it means to be human and yet he knows exactly what is going on inside the mind of Jodie Foster's character.

And the screenplay doesn't make Foster's character out to be this superwoman. She's clearly playing in a man's world and she has to hide her vulnerability and lack of confidence to be able to hang.

Roger Ebert wrote that Silence is up there with Halloween and Psycho. I'm inclined to agree.
 

Batman_

Kingfisher
Just watched The Irishman. Movies like this remind me why I can't sit through movies over 1.5 hrs - it isn't because my attention span is bad, it's because so many movies are shit.

This was 3 and a half fuckin hours and I was pretty much glued to my seat the entire time. Definitely lives up to the hype.
 
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Towgunner

Woodpecker
I just watched "Mirage Men", which you can see for free on YouTube. I recommend it. Its a documentary about UFOs, and, I think its one of the best I've ever seen from that genre. Here's why. Mirage Men explores the UFO phenomenon in a way that I think is much more honest and revealing than any other. It exposes the government's role in cultivating the "buzz" of UFO mythology by way of a variety of disinformation programs. Basically, the government would plant materials, the proverbial "files" with "top secret" labels and all that to certain people within the UFO community. This "information" would in turn make it rounds and, basically, create myths.

When I was in the Marines, our Ops officer took us for a run in the woods. We were all in a single file, because the trail was so narrow. He was at the front I was with my Platoon somewhere in the middle. About half way through, the guy in front of me look back and said something like "orange flavored pizza basketball" and then said pass it along, which I did. Puzzled, I said "orange flavored, what?" "Um orange flavored tennis racket, pass it along" to the guy behind me. The run ended and the Ops officer goes "I said red corvette". The point the good Ops officer was trying to make is that its VERY easy for a message to be corrupted especially when its pasted between people. There is relevance here to the above.

The agents that produced disinformation would engender such a dynamic within the UFO community. They could release a piece of disinformation and by the time it made it through the community it had morphed into something bigger and more grandiose than before. Instead of just Roswell all of a sudden there were dozens of UFO crashes. I saw this happen in the 90s.

The movie ends with a retired agent, who admits to all of this disinformation, saying he actually did see films of a crash with aliens and all that. And for a moment, you wonder, oh sh*t, this is true. But, then again you realize this is coming from the same person that basically lied for a living for years.

What "Mirage Men" reveals is not that aliens are among us, rather, it reveals how superstition and mythology are created. Indeed, the government is involved with UFOs, that much is true. But, far more interesting to the government and our elites is to understand and study how mythology is created.

Think about it. The UFO phenomenon is a myth that manifested itself throughout our lifetime. It started in the 50s, when big metallic flying objects became more common sights with the Air Force and commercial aviation and even space and has since morphed into aliens are responsible for bio-engineering primates to make them into human beings. That last part is not an exaggeration, that was disinformation planted to a reporter. You see, it actually has its own creation story.

In the full context of what is going on today, as we realize that our "free" society is not really free and that we're very much under the control of elites, one can appreciate the interest to control myths and to understand the dynamics of how myths are created and propagated throughout society. To me that's the real message with "Mirage Men".

As far as aliens and UFOs, I don't believe in them. Is there life out there? Probably. But, as one person in the movie stated, "they have the technology to fly 50,000 light years to hear and then they crash"? And, okay, interstellar travel is hazardous, I get it, and one crash, I can see that. But for dozens of crashes? What kind of retard aliens are these? Of course, as we know such travel is basically impossible.

So, no, I do not believe in this. A far more believable thing is for a government and elite class to want to know how to start and manipulate mythology. That's a lot more likely and I think we see evidence of that all over the place.
 
One of my favorites is the noir genre is the Coen Bros BLOOD SIMPLE (1984)




Long before they were the mega directors this was their first film. The low-budget film set the standard for the wave of American indie films to come, and it established the Coens as two of the most important voices in cinema. It also launched the careers of Frances McDormand and cinematographer Barry Sonnenfeld (who would later turn to directing himself).

One of their most underrated films IMO
How come there was a complete absence of police in that movie? Wouldn't someone be suspicious that the bar was closed for so long!

And why did that fella insist in burying him alive. Couldn't he have some how made sure he was at least dead before burying him. It wasn't like he seemed evil or anything!
 
Silence of the Lambs. What a great movie.

Anthony Hopkins' best performance in my book. The man is so detached from what it means to be human and yet he knows exactly what is going on inside the mind of Jodie Foster's character.

And the screenplay doesn't make Foster's character out to be this superwoman. She's clearly playing in a man's world and she has to hide her vulnerability and lack of confidence to be able to hang.

Roger Ebert wrote that Silence is up there with Halloween and Psycho. I'm inclined to agree.
I recently saw for the first time "Manhunter" (1986), directed by Michael Mann, and much preferred it to Silence of the Lambs. The story is drawn from the same source material (the Red Dragon book series) and shares many similarities; FBI profiler Will Graham (played by William Petersen), whose boss is the same as Starling's in Silence ("Jack Crawford", played by Dennis Farina), seeks the help of the imprisoned psychopath Dr Hannibal Lecktor in catching a particularly brutal killer. In Manhunter Graham is the one that found and caught Lecktor 3 years prior, but was seriously injured in the act and quit his job to be with his family, until being asked to return by Crawford.

I'll be the first to admit my judgement is perhaps coloured by wistful nostalgia for 80s entertainment, and this film doesn't disappoint: Mann doing his 'colour palette' thing, great synth soundtrack, but also great performances from all the actors, good pacing and building of tension. I'm sure at the time it was a very elaborate production but in retrospect it looks grittier than Silence, kind of like comparing the feel of the two Terminator movies.

I recommend.
 

renotime

Ostrich
Gold Member
I recently saw for the first time "Manhunter" (1986), directed by Michael Mann, and much preferred it to Silence of the Lambs. The story is drawn from the same source material (the Red Dragon book series) and shares many similarities; FBI profiler Will Graham (played by William Petersen), whose boss is the same as Starling's in Silence ("Jack Crawford", played by Dennis Farina), seeks the help of the imprisoned psychopath Dr Hannibal Lecktor in catching a particularly brutal killer. In Manhunter Graham is the one that found and caught Lecktor 3 years prior, but was seriously injured in the act and quit his job to be with his family, until being asked to return by Crawford.

I'll be the first to admit my judgement is perhaps coloured by wistful nostalgia for 80s entertainment, and this film doesn't disappoint: Mann doing his 'colour palette' thing, great synth soundtrack, but also great performances from all the actors, good pacing and building of tension. I'm sure at the time it was a very elaborate production but in retrospect it looks grittier than Silence, kind of like comparing the feel of the two Terminator movies.

I recommend.
I've only seen bits and pieces of Manhunter on TV. I remember thinking that the color palette didn't really work with the subject matter. It's an interesting juxtaposition though. Plus Mann doesn't strike me as a guy that can make a horror movie. I'll have to give it a full viewing though. Mann always has something cool to offer within a film, even if he sometimes misses the mark like Blackhat.

Mann might be the most successful arthouse filmmaker ever. His films are all character studies disguised as heist flicks. Thief, Heat, hell, even Miami Vice have so much going on all at once. Honestly, I think Miami Vice might be one of the most underrated movies ever. It's worth a watch just to see the amazing cinematography.
 

denj

Pigeon
Just finished watching Split. Certainly.. weird and interesting, with some upsetting moments

I knew it was about split personalities but the way colleagues joked about it I thought it would be more light hearted. I thought James mcAvoy was brilliant at portraying the different characters
 
One of my favorites is the noir genre is the Coen Bros BLOOD SIMPLE (1984)
I just watched this and enjoyed it very much. Some of the scenes I felt dragged on a little too long but other than that the pacing was consistent, with good performances all round.

Having seen it now, it's funny how they carried over the 'private-dick with a beat up VW Beetle' character into The Big Lebowski.
 
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